The current plight of Native Americans, African Americans, Maoris, and the Aborigines

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,484
Florania
#1
All of them were considerably "less progressive" than the European colonizers, who consequently became the majority in these areas.
The Aborigines of Australia were essentially paleolithic people; except for Incans and Aztecs, Native Americans did not build any states; the Maoris were somewhat more advanced than the Aborigines.
Some posters here stated that a sudden "progress" to early modern (or even industrial) civilization gave these people such as a shock that they could not handle.
Today, residential schools were considered an act of atrocity; how was everything back then?
Interestingly enough, some of the "Barbaric tribes" near the Chinese border became assimilated into the Han people; why these people do not adopt so well to the contemporary way?
All of these people have subpar average socio-economic standings, why?
What kept these communities from thriving?
 
Likes: Voltaires Hat

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,484
Florania
#2
Were their communities thriving before contacts?
What are their worthy traditional knowledge and wisdom?
 
Aug 2018
124
digital world
#3
"less progressive" :)

This is the portrait of ancient Germanics and Celts

They were the same during 1000 years BC, nothing progressive
And with their Roman brothers

:D
 
Dec 2012
128
#5
I think these peoples found themselves in front of a too large gap and no time to bridge that gap.
But while some large groups (black africans? natives in high places like Bolivia? Germans in the past?) were too big and lived in an unwelcoming place (for their conquerors-colonizers), so they weren't destroyed or reduced to a helpless minority, others were utterly crushed so they didn't maintain their cultural narrative. This, I think, is the origin of their suffering.

African americans have their own peculiar culture, but that doesn't help them at all, I think.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,268
Australia
#6
All of them were considerably "less progressive" than the European colonizers, who consequently became the majority in these areas.
The Aborigines of Australia were essentially paleolithic people; except for Incans and Aztecs, Native Americans did not build any states; the Maoris were somewhat more advanced than the Aborigines.
Some posters here stated that a sudden "progress" to early modern (or even industrial) civilization gave these people such as a shock that they could not handle.
Thats a simple way of putting it. This subject was my major focus for a few years in Anthropology ; the causes and stages of progression of a collapse of a society and or culture . Its a large and complex subject that I will not go into now in depth. I will wait and see how tis thread pans out ( I am not going to write a long dissertation here if there is no interest or interaction or there is ignorance or bias surfacing ).

For the moment ; this 'shock' comes about because people develop socio-cultural systems that their whole way of life is based on, when these are disrupted their whole life, 'theory of life' , meaning of life and individual place in life are disrupted.

Also, most disruption is from what happens to the environment that sustained these peoples before the 'progressive Europeans' and their sheep arrived. In Australia it was almost instant devastation of the environment that supported these people and the way they lived.

Today, residential schools were considered an act of atrocity; how was everything back then?
That is a broad question ... how was everything ? Do you mean, what was it like in these 'residential schools' ?

"
2 Institutional Education, Care and Treatment

Education was not central to the purpose of residential schools or missions. Only a few hours each day were set aside for school or lessons. Often this was centred on Christian education and an elementary teaching of the 3R’s.’[12] The rest of the day, or much of it, was focused on menial duties what might loosely be called ‘vocational’ training. Theoretically, this involved training Aboriginal children and adolescents in some useful trade or occupation. More often than not, however, the children merely provided for their own survival.


There have been numerous testimonial allegations of sub standard care and physical and sexual abuse in the residential schools and missions in Canada and Australia. In Canada, the most basic levels of health were often not available to Aboriginal children in residential schools. In 1948, the Canadian Departmental Superintendent summed up the nature of the problem when he stated that if he ‘were appointed by the Dominion Government for the express purpose of spreading tuberculosis, there is nothing finer in existence than the average Indian Residential School’.[13]


The hardships endured by many Aboriginal children in residential schools severely affected their physical health and the abuses they suffered affected both their physical and mental well-being. Milloy states that ‘[t]here is no doubt that abuse was a persistent phenomenon’ of the residential school system.[14] Miller notes that the lack of supervision by government officers ‘made it all too easy for the misfits, the sadists, and the perverts to mistreat and exploit the children’.[15] One former residential school student described, in 1966, memories of recaptured runaways from the school being ‘forced to run a gauntlet where they were 'struck with anything that was at hand'’.[16]


The residential school experiment led to many Aboriginals suffering hardship and abuse, including sexual abuse. A Canadian ministerial adviser on sexual abuse commented, in 1990, that ‘closer scrutiny of treatment of children at residential schools would show that all children in some schools were sexually abused’.[17]


The extent and range of abuses and ‘sufferings’ emanating from removal from family to residential schools are numerous. The Nuuchat-nulth researchers[18] group the types of abuses as follows: separation from family; physical conditions at the schools; loss of native language; abuse (emotional, physical, sexual, spiritual); and child labour.


The story is similar in Australia. Many Aborigines removed from their families complained of harsh conditions, denial of parental contact and cultural heritage, harsh punishment and physical and sexual abuse.[19] The following statement from an Aboriginal removed to a mission as a child is not atypical:


We were inculcated into a Christian religion and my Aboriginal culture or history was non-existent. That was completely irrelevant to our lifestyles at that stage. It was really an understatement to say that we were not taught anything about our Aboriginal culture or history. The fact is that our Aboriginality was never mentioned, it was never a consideration.[20]
And again:


When we had our periods we used rags that we had to wash out ourselves. We were never allowed to ask the housemother​
for sanitary clothing. We always had to ask the big red headed Dutchman, who had a vile temper and some awful strange behaviour. He loved nothing better than to watch us have a bath. He also enjoyed giving us a floggings.[21]
An empirical study conducted by the Aboriginal Legal Service of Western Australian (ALSWA) gives further support to the sub standard treatment and abuse many Aborigines placed in missions and other institutional care suffered. Out of a survey response of 483, of whom 411 spent some time in a mission, 81 percent experienced physical abuse and 13 percent experienced sexual abuse during their mission stay.[22]

3 The Effects

In both countries, many Aborigines continue to endure the effects of the removal of children from families to be institutionalised. Loss of culture, family, connection and trust, to name but a few losses, and the pain of abuse, whether physical, sexual or psychological, has resulted in many Aborigines being unable to properly function as parents and members of communities. Often this has been played out through substance abuse, contact with the criminal justice system, poor health, suicide, mental illness, loneliness, and alienation.[23] Professor Beverley, a psychiatrist, has stated that many Aboriginal people who were removed to missions and other institutional and foster care environments have displayed symptoms and behaviour similar to holocaust victims.[24] "

Buti, Antonio --- "The Removal of Aboriginal Children: Canada and Australia Compared" [2002] UWSLawRw 2; (2002) 6(1) University of Western Sydney Law Review 26


Interestingly enough, some of the "Barbaric tribes" near the Chinese border became assimilated into the Han people; why these people do not adopt so well to the contemporary way?
All of these people have subpar average socio-economic standings, why?
What kept these communities from thriving?
On the one hand , like I said above, there are many reasons and causes why they do not adapt so well, it depends on the situation and its complex. I can go into that - IF there is an interest.

The other reason is that when Europeans and others 'westerners' 'discover' and 'civilize' a place , they tend to 'restrict' any 'thriving' .

1544210293131.png


I suggest you watch the whole movie, for this side of the story ;

 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,484
Florania
#7
Thats a simple way of putting it. This subject was my major focus for a few years in Anthropology ; the causes and stages of progression of a collapse of a society and or culture . Its a large and complex subject that I will not go into now in depth. I will wait and see how tis thread pans out ( I am not going to write a long dissertation here if there is no interest or interaction or there is ignorance or bias surfacing ).

For the moment ; this 'shock' comes about because people develop socio-cultural systems that their whole way of life is based on, when these are disrupted their whole life, 'theory of life' , meaning of life and individual place in life are disrupted.

Also, most disruption is from what happens to the environment that sustained these peoples before the 'progressive Europeans' and their sheep arrived. In Australia it was almost instant devastation of the environment that supported these people and the way they lived.



That is a broad question ... how was everything ? Do you mean, what was it like in these 'residential schools' ?

"
2 Institutional Education, Care and Treatment

Education was not central to the purpose of residential schools or missions. Only a few hours each day were set aside for school or lessons. Often this was centred on Christian education and an elementary teaching of the 3R’s.’[12] The rest of the day, or much of it, was focused on menial duties what might loosely be called ‘vocational’ training. Theoretically, this involved training Aboriginal children and adolescents in some useful trade or occupation. More often than not, however, the children merely provided for their own survival.


There have been numerous testimonial allegations of sub standard care and physical and sexual abuse in the residential schools and missions in Canada and Australia. In Canada, the most basic levels of health were often not available to Aboriginal children in residential schools. In 1948, the Canadian Departmental Superintendent summed up the nature of the problem when he stated that if he ‘were appointed by the Dominion Government for the express purpose of spreading tuberculosis, there is nothing finer in existence than the average Indian Residential School’.[13]


The hardships endured by many Aboriginal children in residential schools severely affected their physical health and the abuses they suffered affected both their physical and mental well-being. Milloy states that ‘[t]here is no doubt that abuse was a persistent phenomenon’ of the residential school system.[14] Miller notes that the lack of supervision by government officers ‘made it all too easy for the misfits, the sadists, and the perverts to mistreat and exploit the children’.[15] One former residential school student described, in 1966, memories of recaptured runaways from the school being ‘forced to run a gauntlet where they were 'struck with anything that was at hand'’.[16]


The residential school experiment led to many Aboriginals suffering hardship and abuse, including sexual abuse. A Canadian ministerial adviser on sexual abuse commented, in 1990, that ‘closer scrutiny of treatment of children at residential schools would show that all children in some schools were sexually abused’.[17]


The extent and range of abuses and ‘sufferings’ emanating from removal from family to residential schools are numerous. The Nuuchat-nulth researchers[18] group the types of abuses as follows: separation from family; physical conditions at the schools; loss of native language; abuse (emotional, physical, sexual, spiritual); and child labour.


The story is similar in Australia. Many Aborigines removed from their families complained of harsh conditions, denial of parental contact and cultural heritage, harsh punishment and physical and sexual abuse.[19] The following statement from an Aboriginal removed to a mission as a child is not atypical:


We were inculcated into a Christian religion and my Aboriginal culture or history was non-existent. That was completely irrelevant to our lifestyles at that stage. It was really an understatement to say that we were not taught anything about our Aboriginal culture or history. The fact is that our Aboriginality was never mentioned, it was never a consideration.[20]
And again:


When we had our periods we used rags that we had to wash out ourselves. We were never allowed to ask the housemother​
for sanitary clothing. We always had to ask the big red headed Dutchman, who had a vile temper and some awful strange behaviour. He loved nothing better than to watch us have a bath. He also enjoyed giving us a floggings.[21]
An empirical study conducted by the Aboriginal Legal Service of Western Australian (ALSWA) gives further support to the sub standard treatment and abuse many Aborigines placed in missions and other institutional care suffered. Out of a survey response of 483, of whom 411 spent some time in a mission, 81 percent experienced physical abuse and 13 percent experienced sexual abuse during their mission stay.[22]

3 The Effects

In both countries, many Aborigines continue to endure the effects of the removal of children from families to be institutionalised. Loss of culture, family, connection and trust, to name but a few losses, and the pain of abuse, whether physical, sexual or psychological, has resulted in many Aborigines being unable to properly function as parents and members of communities. Often this has been played out through substance abuse, contact with the criminal justice system, poor health, suicide, mental illness, loneliness, and alienation.[23] Professor Beverley, a psychiatrist, has stated that many Aboriginal people who were removed to missions and other institutional and foster care environments have displayed symptoms and behaviour similar to holocaust victims.[24] "

Buti, Antonio --- "The Removal of Aboriginal Children: Canada and Australia Compared" [2002] UWSLawRw 2; (2002) 6(1) University of Western Sydney Law Review 26




On the one hand , like I said above, there are many reasons and causes why they do not adapt so well, it depends on the situation and its complex. I can go into that - IF there is an interest.

The other reason is that when Europeans and others 'westerners' 'discover' and 'civilize' a place , they tend to 'restrict' any 'thriving' .

View attachment 14137


I suggest you watch the whole movie, for this side of the story ;

Interestingly enough, the nomads around China (including Mongolians and Manchus, who formed ruling dynasties in China once) adopted to the Chinese culture and became indistinguishable from other Chinese.
Manchurian is a moribund (if not dead) language.
Residential school was a failure; what can be done better currently?
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,484
Florania
#8
Thanks for the recommendation! I spent some time to finish the whole movie of Utopia and is quite shocked.
How can the government be brazenly lying about the situation?
Why systematic abuses still happen?

We should see how residential schools failed.
Some people previously asked "why the Australian First People were so technologically backwards"?
Then, is technology the only aspect of humanity?
We assumed industrial civilization during the years of residential school, and these people neither fit in their own culture nor the industrial civilization.
The Chinese fable is 邯郸学步 (learning the walking style of the City of Hangdan); in the fable, a child attempted to learn the walking style of the City of Hangdan; he failed to adopt the new style and forgot how to walk altogether.
In the residential school, the students failed to adopt to both cultures.
In the realistic setting, the old culture is quite moribund; how should these people adopt to the Information Culture?
 
Nov 2018
28
Canada
#10
Those residential school where a terrible thing to happen, pretty much children where stolen from there parents abused by the people put in charge, catholic church and the canadian government.