The death of Edward IV

Nov 2013
1
Wisconsin USA
#81
I think that Crystal Rainbow has done not her research very well, or indeed knows very much about this time period. If she did, she would know that it was customary for noble families, yes even royal ones, to send their children to other noble households to be educated. Indeed Edward IV and his brothers were all educated by the Earl of Warwick, if I am not mistaken.
 

Clemmie

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
3,629
Florida
#83
I think that Crystal Rainbow has done not her research very well, or indeed knows very much about this time period. If she did, she would know that it was customary for noble families, yes even royal ones, to send their children to other noble households to be educated. Indeed Edward IV and his brothers were all educated by the Earl of Warwick, if I am not mistaken.
She dislikes the Woodvilles.
 

Clemmie

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
3,629
Florida
#84
Originally posted by Crystal Rainbow:

... As documentary has pointed out about the timing of Edward birth seems to be interesting. Dominic Mancini had claimed that Cecily, Duchess of York mother of both Edward, and Richard, flew into a rage and in her anger declared Edward a bastard when she had found out that Edward had married Elizabeth Woodville...
I had to smile when I read this again; I wonder how often mothers have flown into a rage at something their offspring have done that angers them and said something just like that. I don't think, if true, it necessary means anything about Edward's parentage.

:D
 

SPERRO

Ad Honorem
Mar 2011
3,480
North East England
#85
Originally posted by Crystal Rainbow:



I had to smile when I read this again; I wonder how often mothers have flown into a rage at something their offspring have done that angers them and said something just like that. I don't think, if true, it necessary means anything about Edward's parentage.

:D
I concur with that point of view. We cannot possibly know what thoughts passed through peoples minds when this became public knowledge.

I would assume that most of the nobility wished for a lasting peace with France, endorsed by Edward marrying a French princess. If we are to believe that Warwick was manipulating matters to this end, it would appear that most would wish it so.
 
Feb 2011
9,998
Cumbernauld Scotland
#86
I think that Crystal Rainbow has done not her research very well, or indeed knows very much about this time period. If she did, she would know that it was customary for noble families, yes even royal ones, to send their children to other noble households to be educated. Indeed Edward IV and his brothers were all educated by the Earl of Warwick, if I am not mistaken.
I have just noticed that my first post has had 11,704 views on this thread from google. One of my blogs seems to have well over 5500 views. Hello and welcome to Historum.:)
 

Louise C

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
7,239
Southeast England
#87
I have just noticed that my first post has had 11,704 views on this thread from google. One of my blogs seems to have well over 5500 views. Hello and welcome to Historum.:)
That doesn't really answer the point raised though, which is that sending noble children away to be raised in other noble households was normal practice at this time. The number of people who have looked at your post is irrelevent.
 
Last edited:
Nov 2015
3
Frome
#88
Controversial marriage to Anne Neville bringing him much wealth and land. He invested much time and effort into securing popularity in the North, he knew should he ever need it he would have much support there?
 
Nov 2015
3
Frome
#89
Thibault Sorry, Louise - I meant what is your evidence for his ambition before the death of E4.

Controversial marriage to Anne Neville? bringing him much wealth and land. He invested much time and effort into securing popularity in the North, he knew should he ever need it he would have much support there?
 
Dec 2012
888
UK
#90
Richard was sent to the north by Edward IV to keep an eye on an area which was largely Lancastrian in sentiment and which could have been a problem for the government in London. His marriage to Anne Neville certainly brought him support, as she had inherited land in the north from her parents.

Edward IV originally wanted Richard to keep an eye on Wales and the Welsh Marches, giving him land there, but later changed his mind and sent him north.

Richard did create a very effective affinity in the north - Horrox has written quite extensively about this.
 

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