The degeneration and stagnation of Argentina and Uruguay

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,601
Florania
Argentina was a "developed country" in the earlier part of the 20th century CE (or 120th century HE, or Holocene Calendar); it has declined to a middle income country and seems to have struck there without any signs of breakthrough.
Stories of degeneration has happened in other parts of the world as well, examples include Afghanistan, Liberia, Libya, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (whether DRC is a state or not is still a question.)
I would like to mention, a nominal GDP per capital of $400 in 1980 is probably better than a nominal GDP of $1000 in 2015.
Inflation Calculator | Find US Dollar's Value From 1913-2016
Hey, $400 in 1980 is $1125.00 in 2015; in other words, most African states had NOT made progress in per capital income.
Now, let's use Argentina as a good model of possible degeneration.
Uruguay, the neighbour of Argentina, witnesses similar pace of "progress."
While Argentina and Uruguay are above other developing countries in many areas, they are still considered developing countries.
 

mark87

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,076
Santiago de Chile
I can't speak much about Uruguay because I know very little about their history but I can say that Argentina's constant stagnation is due to a variety of factors, historical, and economic policies that have produced constant economic catastrophes and recessions. Corruption is unbelievably rampant at all levels of society, the governments content with taking populists measures and then promptly cause another crisis by never repaying their foreign debt. Argentina was the 7th largest economy and per capita earner during the 1880-1930 period, they were ahead of various nations that today probably double their per capita income, like Japan and the Netherlands. Basically the argentine economic history can be summed up in the idea that argentina has thrown away every opportunity its gotten to become devloped over and over again, and today they are almost economically on the same level as their neighbours.
 

David Vagamundo

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
4,439
Atlanta, Georgia USA
Thanks for this thread, as I am hoping to be able to go to both countries later this year, and have been reading their histories.

I can only hope that the lesson has been learned by the Macri government. But that's a thin hope, I know.

Interested to see what those more knowledgeable than I am about the past have to say.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,601
Florania
These two countries (including Chile) are intriguing cases indeed.
Except for the deceptively inaccurate GDP per capital, they have most of the features of developed countries:
Low birth and death rate (stable population), life expectancy that is near/about that of the developed world, highly educated population (since the concept of functional literacy creeps in, even the most developed countries have almost 1/3 of the population beyond the elementary graduation level), fairly modern infrastructures.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,601
Florania
I would like the moderator to rename this thread the development puzzle of Southern South America.
 

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,159
Lisbon, Portugal
These two countries (including Chile) are intriguing cases indeed.
Except for the deceptively inaccurate GDP per capital, they have most of the features of developed countries.
Gross National Income per capita (GNI per capita) is a more accurate indicator to evaluate the living standards of Nation.
You might also use "Human Development Index" indicator created by the UN.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,601
Florania
Gross National Income per capita (GNI per capita) is a more accurate indicator to evaluate the living standards of Nation.
You might also use "Human Development Index" indicator created by the UN.
How the Scandinavian countries win over North America in HDI?
 
Apr 2010
1,038
evergreen state, USA
Time for me to put my two cents worth in on one of these threads. Corruption is a normal human trait. So get used to it. You are either in or out of the group running things. But, hey, if you don't give a s..t about politics, enjoy that Argentine beef and lamb, or that Chilean seafood; and those interesting varietal wines of both countries. As for Uruguay, it might still be a place to hide your tax-dodging money. yawn...
 

David Vagamundo

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
4,439
Atlanta, Georgia USA
Having returned from the travels in Argentina and Uruguay that I had planned, I'll weigh in with my current opinion: both countries are now and are likely to be in the future devoted largely to agricultural and grazing. That's because the Pampas in the northeast of Argentina and in most of Uruguay gives them what few other countries in the world have: lots and lots of flat or rolling fertile land.

That being said, however, much of Argentina is mountainous, arid (the Chaco and most of Patagonia) or swampy (the Ibera wetlands) and so not much economic activity other than tourism and grazing is likely to take root there.

OTOH,The largest single sector of Argentina's economy is industrial--a fact that surprised me when I learned of it, I didn't notice much evidence of poverty or crime, and most of the people I saw and met seemed to be relatively happy. I think I could live happily in Argentina.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,601
Florania
Having returned from the travels in Argentina and Uruguay that I had planned, I'll weigh in with my current opinion: both countries are now and are likely to be in the future devoted largely to agricultural and grazing. That's because the Pampas in the northeast of Argentina and in most of Uruguay gives them what few other countries in the world have: lots and lots of flat or rolling fertile land.

That being said, however, much of Argentina is mountainous, arid (the Chaco and most of Patagonia) or swampy (the Ibera wetlands) and so not much economic activity other than tourism and grazing is likely to take root there.

OTOH,The largest single sector of Argentina's economy is industrial--a fact that surprised me when I learned of it, I didn't notice much evidence of poverty or crime, and most of the people I saw and met seemed to be relatively happy. I think I could live happily in Argentina.
These countries were top of the world in the 19th century; they have not declined into Mali or Uganda for sure, but they are not what they were relative to the world.