The Division of Classes?

Jan 2016
386
Ohio
#1
This is a very loaded question. One that may not even be answerable but one in which I would like to start dialogue.

When/how do you think classes (as in lower/upper class) first arose? Became relevant?

When currency became a thing? Rise of civilization? Etc?

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I personally was thinking maybe during the neolithic times when , or atleast a pre-class structure possibly as simple as a few men giving the rest orders, in a sense of hierarchy.

However this cause me to ask the question of why these people who were transitioning from nomads to making settlements, would willingly submit to the rule of others? Unless of course, in the beginning perhaps it was more of a dominance thing (like a wolf pack) that happened to progress through the ages to become related to wealth? People decided that lvingin together would be safer in larger groups and settling to farm than traveling, and the leadership and roles from the nomadic tribes slowly transitioned into the stationary settlements.

Maybe the idea of elders and leaders would just go to those who were "stronger" which transformed to later bloodlines. I don't know, I'm just rambling at this point.

I am sure there there were those who had to pick the crops and those who gave orders no? What could have decided who these people were? Or was then all a great utopia and everyone put in equal work? In that case, maybe I am wrong and its much later. doubt it.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,117
Australia
#2
This is a very loaded question. One that may not even be answerable but one in which I would like to start dialogue.

When/how do you think classes (as in lower/upper class) first arose? Became relevant?
12,000 years ago

Human sacrifice may have helped build and sustain social class systems

When currency became a thing?
Early Palaeolithic.




Rise of civilization? Etc?
Depends on definition of 'civilization' . That seems to vary .


I personally was thinking maybe during the neolithic times when , or atleast a pre-class structure possibly as simple as a few men giving the rest orders, in a sense of hierarchy.

However this cause me to ask the question of why these people who were transitioning from nomads to making settlements, would willingly submit to the rule of others?
Protection, knowledge, trade, family ties, ancestor traditions and elders , etc


Unless of course, in the beginning perhaps it was more of a dominance thing (like a wolf pack) that happened to progress through the ages to become related to wealth? People decided that lvingin together would be safer in larger groups and settling to farm than traveling, and the leadership and roles from the nomadic tribes slowly transitioned into the stationary settlements.
Depending on the people and where and when, there are different DRIVING reasons . People dont seem to do it unless driven to it ( of necessity) - difficulties drive change. A successful organism (or system) will stay that way - evolution is static - unless driven to change . Look at the Australian Aboriginals .

Also we have evidence of nomadic peoples living alongside settled people and interacting with them, and some settled people having settlements ; with some of the people living in large, organized, well run settlements, some even with king but the majority of the people being nomads .

Things arenlt that 'lineal' and separated .
Maybe the idea of elders and leaders would just go to those who were "stronger" which transformed to later bloodlines. I don't know, I'm just rambling at this point.

I am sure there there were those who had to pick the crops and those who gave orders no? What could have decided who these people were? Or was then all a great utopia and everyone put in equal work? In that case, maybe I am wrong and its much later. doubt it.
Possibly . But one must realize they had wisdom and what would actually constitute strength in the context of a good leader . You would need to be trained, show wisdom, complete your quest , pass the test . It just wasn't the guy with the biggest ... club.

This one is worth watching ( the whole film I mean )

 
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