The Falklands

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,233
Welsh Marches
I didn't know that the British presence is as ancient as the Spanish one. Thanks for the info, it is very important.
Would you know where the name Falklands comes from? I know that Malvinas is actually a French derived name, it comes from Saint-Malo, a small town in Normandy.
As far as I remember the French established a settlement in 1764, the British a settlement in 1765 (without realizing the the French were there), and the Spanish reached an agreement with the French to take over their colony in 1765 or 1766, and actually took it over a year or so later. The sound between the two main islands was named the Falkland Sound by some English sea-captain in the C17, after Viscount Falkland, an English politician of that age, and the name was carried over to the islands.

SG looks a beautiful place, it somehow reminds me of the Lofoten Islands.

This is quite interesting, it seems that the main changes in the population of the penguins have been associated with algal blooms:
http://www.falklandsconservation.com/wildlife/birds/PenguinCensusReport05-06.pdf
 

Yorgos

Ad Honorem
Jun 2010
3,582
SG looks a beautiful place, it somehow reminds me of the Lofoten Islands.
I totally agree about the unique beauty of this oasis in the middle of the world's most cold seas. As for the comparison I just discovered the very existence of Lofoten Islands:); they seem closer to the Falklands than to South Georgia, since there are permanent inhabitants in the Lofoten Islands. There were only two permanent inhabitants of South Georgia, if I remember well. And there is a grave, Lord Shackleton's, a great explorer who managed to save its crew by traveling in a small boat from the Antarctic peninsula to South Georgia where he crossed its mountains to reach the only 'town' of the archipelago and ask for help. What a story... Indeed, South Georgia is an island where only original things happen. Even during the 1985 war, the extreme climate conditions didn't allow anything else than the symbolic presence of an Argentinian vessel who left back to the continent after the defeat.

Well, this link is great. I started reading this and it is very interesting. Thanks for sharing this.
 

Yorgos

Ad Honorem
Jun 2010
3,582
What jackbooted clowns those Argentinian generals were, and how could any British government NOT have fought sooner than kow-tow to such low-lifes? 'Aw a muddle'!
My English is too bad to understand your perfectly expressed sentence! :)
the only thing I understand (with which I agree), is a general repugnance for Videla's regime. :)
 

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,233
Welsh Marches
What an adventure, to climb over the mountains of South Georgia after sailing for days in an open boat! They had a good dramatization of the story on the televison here a few years back. My father met Shackleton just before his death; although quite a young child at the time, he retained a very clear memory of him.
 

Yorgos

Ad Honorem
Jun 2010
3,582
What an adventure, to climb over the mountains of South Georgia after sailing for days in an open boat! They had a good dramatization of the story on the televison here a few years back. My father met Shackleton just before his death; although quite a young child at the time, he retained a very clear memory of him.
I think that Shakleton and Scott's stories, even with dramatically different end, are the most inspiring legends of human presence in Antarctica.
 

Richard Stanbery

Ad Honorem
Jan 2009
8,298
Tennessee
I think that most Americans had two thoughts in thier minds as we were glued to the TV set watching the news about it.

One was most of us were rooting for the British.

But at the back of our minds, we were thinking..."I wonder if we will get dragged into it?"

Britain has earned kind of a reputation with Americans of starting wars that we wind up getting involved in (WWI and WWII).

But like a good cousin that always winds up getting entangled in bar fights that his cousin starts, we were all accepting of the fact that, "If this things gets too rough, well step in and help the Brits".

Just like we always do, and always will.
 
Oct 2010
114
UK, Scotland
I think that most Americans had two thoughts in thier minds as we were glued to the TV set watching the news about it.

One was most of us were rooting for the British.

But at the back of our minds, we were thinking..."I wonder if we will get dragged into it?"

Britain has earned kind of a reputation with Americans of starting wars that we wind up getting involved in (WWI and WWII).

But like a good cousin that always winds up getting entangled in bar fights that his cousin starts, we were all accepting of the fact that, "If this things gets too rough, well step in and help the Brits".

Just like we always do, and always will.
America has developed a very similar reputation in the UK :rolleyes:
 

Richard Stanbery

Ad Honorem
Jan 2009
8,298
Tennessee
America has developed a very similar reputation in the UK :rolleyes:
I know. Odd isnt it, that we go on, mildly blaming each other for our own faults?

It just goes to show how very similar that we really are. Carbon copies, really, right down to our faults and delusions.

Inside the heart of every Briton is an American trying to get out. And inside the heart of every American is a little Briton trying to get out.

Brothers fighting in the womb, in an ideological sense.

But, hey...Our fathers stood in the shield wall with yours on Senelac Hill back in 1066. Side by side we all planted our feet firm and made our stand. It was the same at Crecy, and in the Hundred Years war, the Crusades, etc. We marched with you in ancient times, as we were part of you then. We stood firm in Normandy with you, and a thousand other places.

And we will always be with you, until the end.

For, we are you, and you are us.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2010
114
UK, Scotland
I know. Odd isnt it, that we go on, mildly blaming each other for our own faults?

It just goes to show how very similar that we really are. Carbon copies, really, right down to our faults and delusions.

Inside the heart of every Briton is an American trying to get out. And inside the heart of every American is a little Briton trying to get out.

Brothers fighting in the womb, in an ideological sense.

But, hey...Our fathers stood in the shield wall with yours on Senelac Hill back in 1066. Side by side we all planted our feet firm and made our stand. It was the same at Crecy, and in the Hundred Years war, the Crusades, etc. We marched with you in ancient times, as we were part of you then. We stood firm in Normandy with you, and a thousand other places.

And we will always be with you, until the end.

For, we are you, and you are us.
Human nature really, although if we're going back as far as 1066 then that means you have to be nice to your French cousins too :D