The Feasibility, Effectiveness and Ethics of Restoring the Great Pyramids.

Is Restoring The Pyramid(s) Ethical or Feasible?


  • Total voters
    10
Jun 2015
44
Tennessee, United States
Thankfully, the Great Pyramids at the Giza complex (and many others throughout Egypt) have endured the ages; however, largely thanks to nearby building projects of the past, their outer casings have been lost to time. Unfortunately, this leaves them more vulnerable to damage and erosion than they would have normally been. Thinking about this, I wondered if a restoration of their outer casings would significantly increase their length of survival.

The problem of the Ship of Theseus came to mind: would it be ethical to replace the outer casings (or restoring what remains of them, where applicable)? Would they still fundamentally be the same structure? To this question, I believe that it would still be in the spirit of the Pyramids; as long as the structure itself is what remains, then restoring the casing stones would just be returning them to their intended state and preserve their inner structure.

The next questions would be feasibility and effectiveness, essentially, how much effort would it be to do so, and how much labor would it save us in the future? An estimate I saw on a popular website (How Much Would It Cost to Build the Great Pyramid Today?) gave five billion US$ (US$ 5,000,000,000) as an estimate for the construction of the Pyramid, should it be attempted today. Assuming their estimate is correct (and, believe me, I have serious doubts as to that end), it should be considerably cheaper to simply replace the outer covering, correct? However, this is only for ONE of them, not the entire complex, and certainly not including the Red Pyramid. Then is the question of how much labor is saved. The Great Pyramid has already undergone considerable restoration due to weathering in recent times. I am not an architect or engineer, so I do not consider it my place to pontificate on such a matter.

What are your thoughts on whether such a project could and/or should be done?
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
There is nothing wrong with restoring the pyramid, and it is possible, but it wouldn't be worth the money. There would be far better uses of the money required.
 

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,775
Firstly "in the spirit of" doesn't seem feasible when talking such historical monument. White stone with inscriptions based on? Just descriptions from a few sources. Why stop at only the outer layer, could rebuild entire complex with modern conveniences since it would be only tourist trip.

It is not ethical because Egypt has far greater problems that money could be used towards. If anything spread out the restoration funds to cover several sites as despite such money benefiting tourists rather than Egyptians directly, at least indirectly tourism income could benefit Egyptians.
 

notgivenaway

Ad Honorem
Jun 2015
5,787
UK
yes. why not? It's a common human heritage, and shows the true skill of what we're capable of. And no, I don't believe aliens built them. We did, but the knowledge got lost. Civilisation can regress as well as progress.
 
Jul 2015
66
Bender Qasim
It would reckon it to be feasible but not ethical since t i would think Egypt cant afford it right now with all the political economical instabilities that befall the country.

Unless there is a huge need from a endangered heritage perspective , which i very much doubt. i think it would be best to let it be.

But if Egypt is bold enough to do it they can be my guest.

Btw If people already didnt know The Great Pyramid of Giza was already altered.

Somone pointed it out in another thread about it having a limestone casin, before it was removed by arab conquerors.

supposedly the Great Pyramid of Giza was originally encased in highly polished, smooth white limestone and capped, according to legend, by a perfect pyramid of black stone, probably onyx. Covering an area of 22 acres the white limestone casing was removed by an Arab sultan in AD 1356 in order to build mosques and fortresses in nearby Cairo.

Herodotus, visiting in the fifth century BC, reported that inscriptions of strange characters were to be found on the pyramid's casing stones. In AD 1179 the Arab historian Abd el Latif recorded that these inscriptions were so numerous that they could have filled "more than ten thousand written pages." William of Baldensal, a European visitor of the early fourteenth century, tells how the stones were covered with strange symbols arranged in careful rows. Sadly, in 1356, following an earthquake that leveled Cairo, the Arabs robbed the pyramid of its beautiful casing of stones to rebuild mosques and fortresses in the city. As the stones were cut into smaller pieces and reshaped, all traces of the ancient inscriptions were removed from them. A great library of ageless wisdom was forever lost.
 

notgivenaway

Ad Honorem
Jun 2015
5,787
UK
Many countries should. I'd be happy for Mr. Cameron to offer funds. Budget deficits aside, it won't break the bank. I'm sure Obama, or Merkel, or even President Xi wouldn't mind.
 

zincwarrior

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
5,713
Texas
Many countries should. I'd be happy for Mr. Cameron to offer funds. Budget deficits aside, it won't break the bank. I'm sure Obama, or Merkel, or even President Xi wouldn't mind.
Of course they wouldn't mind. Its not their money. I find it much easier to give away someone else's money.

Should the US give money? Of course not. Unless you are moving the pyramids to Kansas City, its not beneficial to the US in the least.

Frankly if we're buying pyramids I'd rather go for some nice Central American ones. The Pyramid of the Sun is much cooler.