The First American

Aug 2014
4,213
Australia
#33
It doesn't matter how anyone here defines America or American. This thread specifically refers to the definition used by the wikipedia article. It is pretty clear that it is being used in the Roman sense: the primus inter pares or princeps civatis. The "First Man in Rome". It is not the same as the Consul or President. It is an unofficial title granted by one's equals to the person with the most gravitas and dignitas. Benjamin Franklin definitely qualifies for this title.
 
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Likes: Chlodio
Oct 2015
5,097
Matosinhos Portugal
#34
It doesn't matter how anyone here defines America or American. This thread specifically refers to the definition used by the wikipedia article. It is pretty clear that it is being used in the Roman sense: the primus inter pares or princeps civatis. The "First Man in Rome". It is not the same as the Consul or President. It is an unofficial title granted by one's equals to the person with the most gravitas and dignitas. Benjamin Franklin definitely qualifies for this title.
The name América is Latin is right.
 
Oct 2015
5,097
Matosinhos Portugal
#36
So what? Go start a thread about etymology and stop threadcrapping in this one.
I only referred to the origin of the name, like other

Yes it was the peoples of the Iberian peninsula Spain Portugal who discovered new worlds and created new countries. Other countries made the sack and not discovered.

(( Satisfied friend, I told the truth. ))
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,116
Portugal
#37
It doesn't matter how anyone here defines America or American. This thread specifically refers to the definition used by the wikipedia article. It is pretty clear that it is being used in the Roman sense: the primus inter pares or princeps civatis. The "First Man in Rome". It is not the same as the Consul or President. It is an unofficial title granted by one's equals to the person with the most gravitas and dignitas. Benjamin Franklin definitely qualifies for this title.
Interesting analogy with Rome and the concept of “primus inter pares”, that if it was present in the OP, or in the Wikipedia page quoted, I confess that I didn’t saw it. But a possible one since the USA founding fathers apparently took the Roman republic as an inspiration in many issues.

But sometimes I think that it is also difficult to disassociate it from those who were consuls (or USA presidents), that de facto had power and not just power of the word, gravitas and dignitas. Had Benjamin Franklin enough power of the word, to a point that he could influence significantly the president, to a point that we could consider him "primus inter pares"?
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,642
Dispargum
#38
Had Benjamin Franklin enough power of the word, to a point that he could influence significantly the president, to a point that we could consider him "primus inter pares"?
I had never heard of Franklin described as the First American. I grew up in Philadelphia where his legacy is still strong. Even today he has a stadium, a major street, a science museum, and a big bridge all named in his honor. He's everywhere in that city. I have heard him called the First Philadelphian.

Washington and Franklin knew each other. They both attended the Second Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention. At the latter Franklin's status was second only to Washington's. Like Washington, he engaged in little debate at the convention. He was too old and in poor health to serve in Washington's cabinet. I am unaware of any specific conversations between them.

He achieved great prominence before Washington did, in a variety of fields: science, public service, publishing just to name a few.
 
Oct 2015
5,097
Matosinhos Portugal
#39
So what? Go start a thread about etymology and stop threadcrapping in this one.
I only referred to the origin of the name, like other

Yes it was the peoples of the Iberian peninsula Spain Portugal who discovered new worlds and created new countries. Other countries made the sack and not discovered.

(( Satisfied friend, I told the truth. ))
 
Mar 2019
27
Europe
#40
America can be claimed by the Vikings (as the first discoverers, settlers).
So the first American must be Leif Ericsson.

(Native tribes are not discoverers by definition)

native
/ˈneɪtɪv/
noun
  1. 1.a person born in a specified place or associated with a place by birth, whether subsequently resident there or not.
    "a native of Montreal"

    adjective
  2. 1.
    associated with the place or circumstances of a person's birth.
    "he's a native New Yorker"
    synonyms: mother, vernacular
    "her native tongue"

  3. 2.
    (of a plant or animal) of indigenous origin or growth.
    "eagle owls aren't native to Britain"
    synonyms:domestic, home-grown, home-made, home, local;
 

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