The Forgotten Theatres of the Napoleonic Wars

Dec 2011
4,365
Iowa USA
#12
Sicilian Italian Campaigns in 1806 , Dalmatian and Adriatic Campaigns in 1809 - 1813
Also, there was a Dalmatian campaign of 1806.

When Marmont got "his" marshal baton after Wagram he was named Duke of Ragusa for the outcome of the 1806 campaign.

I am still searching for a source on the number of cannon that the Franco-Italians had during this campaign, in case anyone can help. Thank you in advance. answers in PM are welcome.
 
#13
Also, there was a Dalmatian campaign of 1806.

When Marmont got "his" marshal baton after Wagram he was named Duke of Ragusa for the outcome of the 1806 campaign.

I am still searching for a source on the number of cannon that the Franco-Italians had during this campaign, in case anyone can help. Thank you in advance. answers in PM are welcome.
Dalmatian Campaign of 1809*
In 1805 there was the Battle of Caldiero in Italy.
If we are counting the war in Nepal from 1815 we should also count Wellington's campaigns in India and the Anglo-Maratha Wars. Also there were the Swedish Invasion of Norway in 1814 and the Dano-Swedish War (1808-1809.) and the formally declared but bloodless Anglo-Swedish from 1810 to 1812 however this war was just a formality and the British even traded with Sweden in the Baltic. So far we've made a long list of ''forgotten'' campaigns, and considering the size and significance of some of them like the Atlantic Campaign in 1806 and the campaigns in the Indian Ocean (Defense of the colonies was vital to the British trade and economic survival, the campaigns also had major engagements like Santo Domingo and the Invasion of Mauritius.) as well as Russia's adventures in Persia, Finland and against the Ottomans and many others I wonder why they are so often ignored.
 
Dec 2011
4,365
Iowa USA
#14
Dalmatian Campaign of 1809*
In 1805 there was the Battle of Caldiero in Italy.
If we are counting the war in Nepal from 1815 we should also count Wellington's campaigns in India and the Anglo-Maratha Wars. Also there were the Swedish Invasion of Norway in 1814 and the Dano-Swedish War (1808-1809.) and the formally declared but bloodless Anglo-Swedish from 1810 to 1812 however this war was just a formality and the British even traded with Sweden in the Baltic. So far we've made a long list of ''forgotten'' campaigns, and considering the size and significance of some of them like the Atlantic Campaign in 1806 and the campaigns in the Indian Ocean (Defense of the colonies was vital to the British trade and economic survival, the campaigns also had major engagements like Santo Domingo and the Invasion of Mauritius.) as well as Russia's adventures in Persia, Finland and against the Ottomans and many others I wonder why they are so often ignored.
OK, I see this one is so obscure that I need to elaborate.

I can APPRECIATE that the immediate reaction is, "well Austria was neutral during the FOURTH coalition, so that old Iowa hayseed, Kotromanic, is probably tipping the corn whiskey". :lol:

Well, in fact, the Russian Black Sea squadron was "on the loose" in the Ionian and Adriatic Seas during the Fourth coalition.

Russian marines and Slavic militiamen were holding the formerly Venetian port of Cattaro during the Fourth coalition. The same forces laid siege to Ragusa.

So despite the Austrian neutrality there was indeed a Dalmatian campaign of 1806. AND as I said, Marmont relieved the siege of Ragusa in that year, not in 1809.

(It was the Viceroy Eugene de Stepson that led the French forces in 1809 in Dalmatia, not Auguste Marmont by the way.) Yes, Eugene de Beauharnais...
 
Likes: Maki
#15
OK, I see this one is so obscure that I need to elaborate.

I can APPRECIATE that the immediate reaction is, "well Austria was neutral during the FOURTH coalition, so that old Iowa hayseed, Kotromanic, is probably tipping the corn whiskey". :lol:

Well, in fact, the Russian Black Sea squadron was "on the loose" in the Ionian and Adriatic Seas during the Fourth coalition.

Russian marines and Slavic militiamen were holding the formerly Venetian port of Cattaro during the Fourth coalition. The same forces laid siege to Ragusa.

So despite the Austrian neutrality there was indeed a Dalmatian campaign of 1806. AND as I said, Marmont relieved the siege of Ragusa in that year, not in 1809.

(It was the Viceroy Eugene de Stepson that led the French forces in 1809 in Dalmatia, not Auguste Marmont by the way.) Yes, Eugene de Beauharnais...

Sorry I thought you were referring to this Dalmatian Campaign (1809) - Wikipedia

Marmont did lead forces in Dalmatia in 1809, Eugen fought Archduke John in Northern Italy.
I haven't heard of this campaign in 1806, I quickly googled it and yes, you are right.
However the siege of Ragusa doesn't really involve Austria, Ragusa was independent and was captured by the French in 1806 with Austria ceding the surrounding area to the Kingdom of Italy in the Peace of Pressburg, however I didn't know that it was besieged by the Russian fleet.
 
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Likes: Kotromanic
Dec 2011
4,365
Iowa USA
#16
Sorry I thought you were referring to this Dalmatian Campaign (1809) - Wikipedia

Marmont did lead forces in Dalmatia in 1809, Eugen fought Archduke John in Northern Italy.
I haven't heard of this campaign in 1806, I quickly googled it and yes, you are right.
However the siege of Ragusa doesn't really involve Austria, Ragusa was independent and was captured by the French in 1806 with Austria ceding the surrounding area to the Kingdom of Italy in the Peace of Pressburg, however I didn't know that it was besieged by the Russian fleet.

Thank you, I am corrected properly about 5th coalition. Marmont was governor in the intervening period, I think until he recalled to his ill fate in Spain?

Battle of Raab in 1809 is nearer to site of the much more well-known 12th Battle of the Isonzo (Caporetto) of 1917 than Dalmatia. de Beauharnais was the commander at Raab, where Archduke John was outgunned and retreated towards Archduke Charles.
 
#17
Thank you, I am corrected properly about 5th coalition. Marmont was governor in the intervening period, I think until he recalled to his ill fate in Spain?

Battle of Raab in 1809 is nearer to site of the much more well-known 12th Battle of the Isonzo (Caporetto) of 1917 than Dalmatia. de Beauharnais was the commander at Raab, where Archduke John was outgunned and retreated towards Archduke Charles.
Yes, Marmont was the governor until he was sent to Spain. Speaking of forgotten theatres and Marmont in Spain one big reason why his force was numerically inferior to Wellington's and stretched thin was because of the Royal Navy raids on the Spanish coastline, which supplied Spanish guerrillas and harassed French positions, often forcing the French to send soldiers to deal with raids and as a result Marmont didn't get enough reinforcements in time for Salamanca. Also Eugene fought John in northern Italy at Travis and other battles in the 5th coalition, but Raab is in Hungary, after it Eugene united with Napoleon at Vienna and fought at Wagram later, however Eugene did have Italian troops at Raab. You might be thinking of the Battle of the Piave in Italy, fought at the same site as the Battle of Piave in WWI but over a month before Raab, there John was outnumbered and outgunned and retreated out of Italy towards Slovenia and the Austrian Alps.
 
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Dec 2011
4,365
Iowa USA
#18
Yes, Marmont was the governor until he was sent to Spain. Speaking of forgotten theatres and Marmont in Spain one big reason why his force was numerically inferior to Wellington's and stretched thin was because of the Royal Navy raids on the Spanish coastline, which supplied Spanish guerrillas and harassed French positions, often forcing the French to send soldiers to deal with raids and as a result Marmont didn't get enough reinforcements in time for Salamanca. Also Eugene fought John in northern Italy at Travis and other battles in the 5th coalition, but Raab is in Hungary, after it Eugene united with Napoleon at Vienna and fought at Wagram later, however Eugene did have Italian troops at Raab. You might be thinking of the Battle of the Piave in Italy, fought at the same site as the Battle of Piave in WWI but over a month before Raab, there John was outnumbered and outgunned and retreated out of Italy towards Slovenia and the Austrian Alps.

Thank you.

I recalled there was a 5th coalition location that overlapped with a large battle from The Great War. Appreciate your correction on Piave River.
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,279
Republika Srpska
#19
@Mastersonmcvoidson
A good source for the 1806 Adriatic Campaign that Kotromanic has mentioned would be Dušan D. Vuksan, Petar I Petrović Njegoš i njegovo doba, Istorijski institut Naučnog društva NR Crne Gore, Cetinje 1951.
The book really goes into detail of that campaign and the complicated Montenegro-France-Russia-Austria-Ottomans pentagon that formed there at the time.
 

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