The Future of Iraq

Dec 2015
3,505
USA
#1
I am posting two articles concerning Modern day Iraq..but I would like to hear about what other posters have to say about the future of Iraq. Personally I have my hopes up there have been advancements made in Iraq.

WHISKY is back on the tables in Mosul, one of Iraq’s biggest cities. Until last year, boozing was punishable with 80 lashes. These days a refurbished hotel with a nightclub on the roof, set in a wood that had sheltered the high command of the so-called Islamic State (IS), is fully booked. Shops around the ruins of Mosul’s university have new fronts. Families queue at restaurants on the banks of the Tigris. There is not a niqab, or face-veil, in sight.

Fifteen years after America’s invasion, Iraq is getting back on its feet

Today, the United States and Iraq both consider themselves as strategic partners, given the American political and military involvement after the invasion of Iraq and their mutual, deep-rooted relationship that followed. The United States provides the Iraqi security forces millions of dollars of military aid and training annually.

Iraq–United States relations - Wikipedia

The War in Iraq in 2003 did cost the lives of good Americans and Iraqis. But history shows countries can recover from war IE Germany , Italy and Japan recovering after WW2 which was a devasting war for these 3 losing countries. Fast forward...Does Modern Iraq have the chance to get back to the Golden age it once was at centuries ago?
 
Likes: Futurist
Mar 2019
918
Kansas
#2
I am posting two articles concerning Modern day Iraq..but I would like to hear about what other posters have to say about the future of Iraq. Personally I have my hopes up there have been advancements made in Iraq.
Well with ISIS finally put back in their box, I think the future looks pretty good for Iraq. The place always had a lot going for it. Just needed the right hands to make it happen
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,039
SoCal
#3
Considering that Iraq has a lot of oil, it could probably become a very wealthy country like Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Qatar, Bahrain, and Kuwait are. I do think that long-term political stability in Iraq would require Iraqi Sunni Arabs to feel like their concerns are being addressed, though. This could be done by including Sunni Arab parties in Iraqi governing coalition, by giving Sunni Arabs a share of Iraq's oil revenue, and/or by creating an autonomous region for Sunni Arabs in the parts of Iraq where they are the majority.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,039
SoCal
#4
Well with ISIS finally put back in their box, I think the future looks pretty good for Iraq. The place always had a lot going for it. Just needed the right hands to make it happen
Agreed. Of course, the long-term stability of Iraq is probably going to depend on whether Iraq's Sunni Arabs feel like they are being included and having their concerns and needs addressed by the Iraqi government.
 
Mar 2019
918
Kansas
#5
Agreed. Of course, the long-term stability of Iraq is probably going to depend on whether Iraq's Sunni Arabs feel like they are being included and having their concerns and needs addressed by the Iraqi government.
Yeah the Kurds have been agitating a long time for some form of autonomy in the area. Oddly the piece of country they inhabit does not have a lot going on. So even if they were granted an independent state, Iraq at large would not lose much other than land
 
Likes: Futurist
Jul 2016
9,061
USA
#6
Does Modern Iraq have the chance to get back to the Golden age it once was at centuries ago?
No, because not a single one of the causes for the Sunni Arab-Shi'a-Kurdish cycle of violence was properly addressed. All that happened was a Phase 3 insurgency, ISIS, was beaten back to Phase 1-2, where it is still active, where it will still bomb, and assassinate, and cause mayhem, fighting from the shadows, where it was best at, against an adversary that was a terrible performer in a COIN role. Meanwhile, the Iran backed Baghdad govt is still intolerant of Sunni Arabs, which means the Sunni Arabs will support anyone who champions them against the Shi'a. And the Kurds still want their own country, which happens to sit on some rather oil rich lands that the Baghdad govt wants to keep and has shown they will fight for.

Instead of booze being seen as a sign of victory, why not focus on this stuff?

May 2019: Bomb explosion leaves two civilians wounded in Mosul

Mar 2019: Car bomb blast kills two in Iraq's Mosul: medics

Most nonsensical article: Has Islamic State returned to Iraq? They never left. LOLOLOL
 
Likes: Futurist
Jul 2016
9,061
USA
#9
I thought that things got a bit better in regards to this after Maliki's departure in 2014?
Maliki isn't gone, he's just not PM anymore. He's still VP, still a major power player, still the patron of ISOF. The current PM is also an ardent Shi'a, thought the current pres is a Kurd. Still barely any Sunni Arabs in any cabinet positions of power in Baghdad, though at least some of the provincial governors of Sunni Arab dominated governorates are not Shi'a lackies anymore, which at least was a bone the Shi'a threw that helped.
 
Likes: Futurist

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