The Greatest "father and son" in the Ancient world

Sep 2013
596
Oakville, Ontario
#22
Julius Caesar and his adopted son Octavian who became Augustus and formed a lasting Roman Empire. So far-reaching the influence of this pair that we still have two months of the official year named after specifically them.
 
Likes: macon
May 2015
270
villa of Lucullus
#24
I don't think the Caesar-Augustus relationship would qualify. To the best of my knowledge Augustus wasn't raised in Caesar's household and Caesar didn't have a strong relationship with his mother. I don't think Caesar would have been a father figure when Augustus was growing up.
 

caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,124
#26
Vespasian and Titus come to mind. Rome is settling down to autocratic rule, the pacification of Judaea was successful, and only the plagues and fires in Rome during Titus' reign proved a sour poin (Ooops, I forgot Vesuvius in 79ad). Also the period when they built the Flavian Amphitheatre - that's the Colosseum to you and me.
 
Nov 2011
821
The Bluff
#28
What are your thoughts on Antigonos and Demetrios as a combination?
Antigonos was quite an energetic bloke with an ambition as big as himself. He played the politics well and was possibly the Diadoch with the most ruthless streak, though Kassandros was not lacking there. Diodoros often contrasts his harsh, ruthless manner with Ptolemy who appears as the epitome of the good king in the Sicilian's pages. Something to consider when reading statements along the lines that Diodoros 18-20 is a mirror of Hieronymus. Just how the Kardian could so blacken the patriarch of the Antigonid dybasty while patronised by same is worth some considerable thought!

Demitrios inherited the arrogant streak and often found himself putting Macedonian noses out of joint along with others he needed support from. Far more single minded than his one time brother in law, Pyrrhos, he nonetheless undid as much as he acheived due to his personal excesses. His fruitless end is a perfect comment on his life perhaps.
 
Feb 2011
6,053
#29
Ban Biao, Ban Chao, and Ban Yong came from a pretty prestigious line, that's three generations in a row in which all members did something famous (including Ban Chao's brother and sister as well). Ban Biao was a famous historian. Ban Chao didn't like the path put before him, and instead joined the army. He pulled a Hernan Cortes by conquering the Tarim Basin with 36 men. Ban Yong expanded on his father's achievements. I'm translating a comic based on Ban Chao:





Eastern Han's conquest of the Tarim Basin, comic by hotoon
 
#30
Antigonos was quite an energetic bloke with an ambition as big as himself. He played the politics well and was possibly the Diadoch with the most ruthless streak, though Kassandros was not lacking there. Diodoros often contrasts his harsh, ruthless manner with Ptolemy who appears as the epitome of the good king in the Sicilian's pages. Something to consider when reading statements along the lines that Diodoros 18-20 is a mirror of Hieronymus. Just how the Kardian could so blacken the patriarch of the Antigonid dybasty while patronised by same is worth some considerable thought!

Demitrios inherited the arrogant streak and often found himself putting Macedonian noses out of joint along with others he needed support from. Far more single minded than his one time brother in law, Pyrrhos, he nonetheless undid as much as he acheived due to his personal excesses. His fruitless end is a perfect comment on his life perhaps.
I hadn't considered the significance of the fact that Diodorus used Hieronymus. It's definitely curious that Antigonos was presented apparently by Hieronymus in such a way.

I find Demetrios and Pyrrhos to be curiously similar cases, in that they both strike me as being opportunistic adventurers incapable of preserving an empire. I suppose, when I think more about it, Demetrios was indeed more single-minded, whereas Pyrrhos may as well have had ADD.
 

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