The Greatest "father and son" in the Ancient world

Nov 2011
1,051
The Bluff
Yes, there are some similarities between the two in that regard. Pyrrhos set out having to reclaim his realm as did Demetrius after Ipsos. Both had to attempt to consolidate Macedonia as well as Greece. Both reached and lost. Both sought Pelopponesian dominance and failed at Sparta's walls and both alienated allies and supporters. Pyrrhos, though, was far more inclined to jump from project to the next though it pays to be careful as Plutarch - who is our main narrative source - uses literary devices to exaggerate this to suit his theme. For Pyrrhos, while the world might have been an oyster, that oyster was part of a decent farm; he spent much time tasting many and never finding the one.
 
Oct 2018
1,511
Sydney
Yes, there are some similarities between the two in that regard. Pyrrhos set out having to reclaim his realm as did Demetrius after Ipsos. Both had to attempt to consolidate Macedonia as well as Greece. Both reached and lost. Both sought Pelopponesian dominance and failed at Sparta's walls and both alienated allies and supporters. Pyrrhos, though, was far more inclined to jump from project to the next though it pays to be careful as Plutarch - who is our main narrative source - uses literary devices to exaggerate this to suit his theme. For Pyrrhos, while the world might have been an oyster, that oyster was part of a decent farm; he spent much time tasting many and never finding the one.
I love this oyster analogy. I love Plutarch's characterisation of Pyrrhus. It's as if he is Alexander the Great but 2.0. Like he's on crack. For example, note his slaughtering of the Spartan vanguard and his chopping in two the Mamertine warrior. I wonder if any of these stories go back to Pyrrhus' own propaganda. He no doubt wanted to appear Alexandrian. Anyway, thanks for your response.
 
Nov 2011
1,051
The Bluff
He most assuredly aped Alexander and deliberately so. Plutarch ensures his Pyrrhos is never content with what he has an even gives us a supposed conversation between his subject and trusted advisor Kineas demonstrating this. It is set against the background of Pyrrhos' "spur of the moment" decision to trot off to Tarentum having just been pushed out of Macedonia. What is not apparent is that Plutarch has compressed events and time to suit his narrative purpose: the departure for Italy and Pyrrhos' loss of Macedonia are well over two years apart. Moreover, Pyrrhos owed Tarentum for its aid in grabbing Korkyra a little earlier.
 
Oct 2018
1,511
Sydney
He most assuredly aped Alexander and deliberately so. Plutarch ensures his Pyrrhos is never content with what he has an even gives us a supposed conversation between his subject and trusted advisor Kineas demonstrating this. It is set against the background of Pyrrhos' "spur of the moment" decision to trot off to Tarentum having just been pushed out of Macedonia. What is not apparent is that Plutarch has compressed events and time to suit his narrative purpose: the departure for Italy and Pyrrhos' loss of Macedonia are well over two years apart. Moreover, Pyrrhos owed Tarentum for its aid in grabbing Korkyra a little earlier.
I hadn't considered the deception within that story, but yes, there was some time between the two events. Which source mentions that Tarentum helped Pyrrhus take Corcyra? Is that Diodorus?
 
Nov 2011
1,051
The Bluff
Can't call that to mind down here on holiday time in the Snowies. You may well be right though on Diodoros. I can email you a chapter on Pyrrhos I wrote for a book that died before publication when home tomorrow perhaps.