The History of the Ashanti Empireq

Aug 2018
32
United States
#12
Well you can PM me this "DNA evidence" of "descending from the Sahel". There is no mention of any actual, specific DNA evidence in the video, just a statement around 1:10 about the ancestors of much of Ghana's modern population and how DNA analysis connects much of Ghana's modern population to a population from 2700 years ago."
The video actually claims that the migrants between the 11th and 15th centuries are connected to Ghana's modern day population. Not the ones from 2700 years ago. Here are the sources used in the video https://www.patreon.com/posts/20893655
Also my bad for the other responses. Didn't realize you were talking to someone else.
 

Ighayere

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
2,513
Benin City, Nigeria
#13
The video actually claims that the migrants between the 11th and 15th centuries are connected to Ghana's modern day population. Not the ones from 2700 years ago. Here are the sources used in the video https://www.patreon.com/posts/20893655
Also my bad for the other responses. Didn't realize you were talking to someone else.
Okay, yeah I get what the video was saying now. I did misinterpret it the first time.

Regarding the study in that ncbi link (this study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3314991/), that doesn't really prove that the Akan people are of Sahelian origin although I can see how one could try to interpret it in that way.

The thing to keep in mind is that the northern part of Ghana (and the northern part of the Ivory Coast) was/is quite distinct from the southern regions in some important ways. One of these is origin. The northern areas did have an influx of Mande speakers and some other Sahelian groups from somewhat further north. The Gonja kingdom, for example, was founded by Mande cavalrymen that invaded or settled in the area.

But there was also a trade in slaves from the north (the northern parts of Ghana/Ivory Coast) down to the south, towards the forest areas that the Akan inhabited, that went on for a few centuries. Some of these slaves would have been gradually incorporated/assimilated into Akan society over time. T.E. Bowdich (the British writer who is mentioned in the video) mentions how some of the Asante noblemen would sometimes marry their daughters (the noblemen's daughters) off to their favorite slaves. (Of course something like that seems unthinkable to us in modern times, but the nature of slavery there could produce much closer bonds than in some other parts of the world.)

There was also an influx of some free people of Sahelian origin into Asante in the late 18th and early 19th century, and these probably would have intermarried with some Akan people over time as well. Bowdich, and multiple other sources, mention such non-Akan people of Sahelian origin who had been incorporated or assimilated into the Asante state. But these were more recent arrivals, not the relics of a migration from the ancient Ghana empire.

What I'm saying basically is that there are other avenues to easily explain the existence of ancestry from Sahelian populations in certain Akan populations by simply looking at the documented influx of both slaves and free people from Sahelian areas into certain already established Akan states, particularly Asante, without making any reference to supposed origins from the ancient Ghana empire.
 

Ighayere

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
2,513
Benin City, Nigeria
#14
the Almoravid invasion of Ghana which took place in the 1000s.
While there are various theories about this, I would say that it's not certain that this happened, or at least it's doubtful that anything like this happened in the way that it has been presented in some older sources. There's an interesting article that discusses the history of this idea.
 
Last edited:
Aug 2018
32
United States
#15
While there are various theories about this, I would say that it's not certain that this happened, or at least it's doubtful that anything like this happened in the way that it has been presented in some older sources. There's an interesting article that discusses the history of this idea.
Interesting article. Either way, the oral history of the Akan also tells of a migration from the Sahel to escape Islamic pressure so whether or not the Almoravid did conquer Ghana is another topic of debate. Btw I know you said you aren't trying to nitpick but you do it a lot lol. I'm assuming you're Mercurial Man in From Nothing's comments?
 

Ighayere

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
2,513
Benin City, Nigeria
#16
I'm assuming you're Mercurial Man in From Nothing's comments?
No. Whoever that is, it's not me. I don't comment on YouTube videos.

I do see how my comments can come across as nitpicking though that isn't my intention. I think that seemingly small details can be important in some cases, but the intent is not to criticize any inaccuracies just for the sake of criticizing of course.
 

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