The invasion of France in 1940 fails and the SK overthrow Hitler afterwards

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,723
SoCal
If the German invasion of France would have failed in 1940 (as a result of France not sending its Seventh Army to the Low Countries and as a result of France defending the Ardennes more), and if the Schwarze Kapelle would have subsequently overthrown Hitler and the Nazis and failed to make peace with the Anglo-French afterwards (due to their desired peace terms being too different), how would the Schwarze Kapelle continue the war against the Anglo-French?

Would the SK adopt a purely defensive strategy similar to the Hindenburg Line in World War I in the hopes of bleeding the Anglo-French dry and thus getting the Anglo-French to agree to better peace terms?

Also, how would the SK deal with the risk of starvation in Germany as a result of the British blockade? Would they subject Czechs, Poles, and Jews to starvation so that there would be enough food to feed the entire German population (so that the German population won't rebel against them)?

In addition to this, I would like to bring up a radical idea that I've previously thought about before--having the SK withdraw to Germany's 1914 borders in the east and let the Soviet Union occupy the rest of Poland. I mean, such a move would obviously be very risky since the Soviet Union would now have a long border (as opposed to a short border--which it would get by occupying and annexing the Baltic countries) with Germany and since 10-15% of the German population are Communist sympathizers. However, it's worth noting that Poland, the Baltic countries, Romania, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, and China all survived either for a couple of decades or indefinitely in spite of having a common border with the Soviet Union. Thus, why can't the more powerful Germany do the same thing?

The logic behind a German withdrawal to the 1914 borders in the East would be to make it impossible for Britain and France to recreate an independent non-Communist Poland (due to most of Poland's population ending up under Soviet rule). This would piss off Britain and France beyond belief, but it might be better from Germany's perspective than not doing this, continuing the war to the very end, and then having millions of ethnic Germans get expelled from Eastern Europe. That's the problem for the SK--if it can't make peace with Britain and France (due to too much disagreement), Germany is going to be screwed in the long(er)-run--which is why I am proposing a "Hail Mary" approach of letting the Soviet Union occupy most of Poland while allowing Germany to keep the parts of Poland--specifically those within Germany's 1914 borders--that German nationalists actually care about.

Anyway, any thoughts on everything that I wrote here?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,723
SoCal
In the grand scheme of things, it might be a good negotiating strategy for the SK to threaten to throw most of Poland to the Soviet wolves if Britain and France don't give them the peace terms that they want. In such a scenario, Britain and France wouldn't really be able to do anything about it considering that they lack a common border with Poland.
 
Apr 2018
726
France
Imagine that the USSR remains on the sidelines and Germany after a few years collapses for the prolonged siege.
Would the USSR invaded Germany with its collapse?
In the event of a Soviet invasion of Germany, would the Anglo-French attack the USSR, perhaps with allied support?
 
Nov 2017
789
Commune
Imagine that the USSR remains on the sidelines and Germany after a few years collapses for the prolonged siege.
Would the USSR invaded Germany with its collapse?
In the event of a Soviet invasion of Germany, would the Anglo-French attack the USSR, perhaps with allied support?
Stalin would have never invaded Germany. It simply wasn't in his plans. At most he would only support the Red Kapelle and agitate for a Communist revolution, but not invade Germany. Stalin only wanted to reannex strategic portions that once belonged to the Russian Empire, and it's doubtful that he would have ever invaded those areas had the Nazis not swallow Austria and Czechoslovakia and explicitly claimed in their propaganda they wanted to conquer Russia. The Soviet occupation of Eastern Europe and eastern Germany only came after the Nazis invaded most of it and Russia itself, which was in tandem with the general Allied occupation of European territories.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,723
SoCal
Imagine that the USSR remains on the sidelines and Germany after a few years collapses for the prolonged siege.
Would the USSR invaded Germany with its collapse?
In the event of a Soviet invasion of Germany, would the Anglo-French attack the USSR, perhaps with allied support?
I doubt that they would. After all, they'd probably be exhausted from their war with Germany and thus will not want to pick a new fight with the Soviet Union.

Of course, the more interesting question is this--if the Schwarze Kapelle will withdraw to Germany's 1914 borders in the East and thus allow the Soviet Union to occupy most of Poland, would Britain and France have continued the fight against Germany knowing that the Soviets rather than Germany are the people who are now occupying most of Poland?
 
Apr 2017
1,678
U.S.A.
Does Germany withdraw from the low countries, Denmark and Norway in this scenario? The west may consider peace if they additionally withdrew from Czechoslovakia, if not then probably not.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,723
SoCal
Does Germany withdraw from the low countries, Denmark and Norway in this scenario?
In exchange for peace, they probably would be--with the possible exception of Eupen and Malmedy, which they might want to keep.

The west may consider peace if they additionally withdrew from Czechoslovakia, if not then probably not.
Sure, the SK might be willing to withdraw from the non-German parts of Czechoslovakia. Probably not from the Sudetenland, though.
 
Apr 2017
1,678
U.S.A.
In exchange for peace, they probably would be--with the possible exception of Eupen and Malmedy, which they might want to keep.



Sure, the SK might be willing to withdraw from the non-German parts of Czechoslovakia. Probably not from the Sudetenland, though.
If they pay reparations then maybe.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,723
SoCal
If they pay reparations then maybe.
They would insist on keeping Germany's 1914 borders in the East or at the very least holding plebiscites (with the voting being limited to people who lived there in 1918) in the disputed areas in the East, though.