the Kalevala , the great creation myth from Finland , told by an Australian

Nov 2018
312
Denmark
#12
I found a Karelian recipe in my Finnish cookbook called Karjalan paisti. It consists of meat, onions and spices not exactly the same as the American recipe.
However, it may have been easier to pronounce for English speaking neighbors.
Then many of the poems from Kalevala are collected in Karelia.
The recipe that looks most familiar to the American is one called Lihakeittait, it consists of meat, potatoes, carrots, onions and allspice.
 

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,976
Lorraine tudesque
#15
If you are interested in the Kalevala, just take a walk in Helsinki. The whole city is decorated with scenes from the Kalevala.
The National Museum has the whole story painted on the ceiling.
 
Jan 2019
55
Finland
#17
I found a Karelian recipe in my Finnish cookbook called Karjalan paisti. It consists of meat, onions and spices not exactly the same as the American recipe.
However, it may have been easier to pronounce for English speaking neighbors.
Then many of the poems from Kalevala are collected in Karelia.
The recipe that looks most familiar to the American is one called Lihakeittait, it consists of meat, potatoes, carrots, onions and allspice.
Recipes like Karelian Stew and Karelian Pies became "karelian" after they were brought elsewhere in Finland by the Karelian evacuees post-WW2, otherwise they are just a simple stew and rice pies. Just put chunks of beef and pork, some carrots and onions into a pot and put it in the oven and there's your Karelian Stew. With rice pies a spread made of butter and boiled eggs is a must and it's something anyone can look forward to in a funeral or a wedding. "Lihakeitto" is just a basic soup into which basically anything can go into. These are the foods of a poor forest people, and there's really not that much to them. In general terms the Karelian dishes are made in an oven, where as elsewhere stoves were more common. I'm from the middleground and my grandfather could make a very good kalakukko.
 
Nov 2018
312
Denmark
#18
These are the foods of a poor forest people, and there's really not that much to them. In general terms the Karelian dishes are made in an oven, where as elsewhere stoves were more common. I'm from the middleground and my grandfather could make a very good kalakukko.
Don't say so. Smallholder's food is IMHO pretty good.
Danish and Finnish cuisine use many of the same ingredients.
However, the Finns use them in such a way that they get a twist in comparison with Danish food.
I'm not so much for fish. But I think I should try kalakukko
 
Jan 2019
55
Finland
#19
Don't say so. Smallholder's food is IMHO pretty good.
Danish and Finnish cuisine use many of the same ingredients.
However, the Finns use them in such a way that they get a twist in comparison with Danish food.
I'm not so much for fish. But I think I should try kalakukko
My favourite type of kalakukko has no fish in it, it's called Lanttukukko, lanttu=rutabaga or turnip. Pork, in the form of bacon is a major ingredient as well. The fish commonly used in kalakukko is vendace which I prefer lightly tossed in flour, then pan fried with lots of butter. A signature dish of my town that is just as much as kalakukko is.
 
Likes: Runa
Nov 2018
312
Denmark
#20
My favourite type of kalakukko has no fish in it, it's called Lanttukukko, lanttu=rutabaga or turnip. Pork, in the form of bacon is a major ingredient as well. The fish commonly used in kalakukko is vendace which I prefer lightly tossed in flour, then pan fried with lots of butter. A signature dish of my town that is just as much as kalakukko is.
I have turnips in my garden,one of my favaorite vegetables.
Never thought I could use them like this :)
 
Likes: Taikuri

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