The Kensington Runestone

Jul 2018
177
Florida
ok people -- hope you had a good thanksgiving..(you know, that fake holiday when the Native Americans and some fanatic religious people had dead turkeys together) hummm, now why would I say "fake" hummmmmm

ANYWAY, referring back to posting number 571, refresh the memory cells --- try this for size...look at the number of maps that have the "same ink spot that looks like a fort with a flag -- ALL of them at the same latitude ----- you get the point. It is "knowledge transmission" with cartography as the conduit.

ENJOY THE CHRISTMAS SEASON....many good books out there regarding the Templars and North America...

I bet they went "underground"
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Phippsburg History Center

NEWPORT TOWER

Inventory List

We are up to 83 maps/globes at this point. The number will adjust as the data is worked during the attribute cataloguing we will start in January. At present, there are 7 maps from the 1300s, 13 from the 1400s, 50 from the 1500s, and 13 from the 1600s.


 
Jul 2018
177
Florida
and for more viewing pleasure...enjoy
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Phippsburg History Center

· November 30 ·


NEWPORT TOWER
1300 Ptolemy_Planudes
Digital Vatican Library/MSS Urb.gr.82

Slide 14 of 19.
This slide again used folio 65v for its construction. What it illustrates, utilizing the “corrected” latitude scale, is the Newport Tower. Correct latitude and a cross on top of the structure.
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In 1175 CE, Gerard of Cremona would translate Ptolemy’s “Almagest” treatise from Arabic to Latin. This treatise mentioned that Ptolemy was working on a separate treatise, this one being geographical: “However, the discussion of this subject belongs to a separate, geographical treatise, so we shall expose it to view by itself [in such a treatise]. (Toomer 1968: 130)

In 1300 CE, a 9th century text copy of Ptolemy’s “Geography,” written in Arabic, was translated by the Byzantine Greek scholar, translator, and polymath Maximus Planudes. Planudes’ Greek translation (MSS Urb.gr.82 of the Vatican Library) contained a reconstruction of the 27 maps detailed in the treatise. One map is a reconstruction of the oikoumene. The remaining maps are regional maps.

THE 27 RECONSTRUCTED MAPS WITHIN PLANUDES’ MANUSCRIPT ARE THE OLDEST SURVIVING MAPS ATTRIBUTED TO THE PTOLEMAIC TRADITION OF CARTOGRAPHY.

In 1400, Planudes’ “Geography” would find its way to Rome, be translated into Latin, and then spread throughout the rest of Europe. Some versions would be manuscript text only, others would include re-drawn versions of the maps.
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Ptolemaic scholars are unclear as to what additional attributes Planudes layered onto the 27 maps. From a 2018 article written by Renate Burri:

“It is uncontested that after the Fourth Crusade and the Latin dominion over Constantinople Ptolemy’s Geography was almost forgotten and nearly nowhere to be found in the capital of the Byzantine Empire. But it experienced a revival in the early Palaeologan Renaissance thanks to the efforts of the most important scholar of this period, the monk and polymath Maximos Planudes (ca. 1255 – ca. 1305).[22] He is considered the re-discoverer and re-editor of the work.[23] Even if it remains to this day obscure e) what kind of Geography manuscript(s) he rediscovered and f) WHAT EXACTLY HE CONTRIBUTED TO THE NEW EDITION OF THE WORK [present author’s emphasis], the seven most ancient manuscripts handed down to us, all copied closely around 1300, are all linked to him, among them the three opulent large format parchment codices Urbinas graecus 82 (Vatican City, Vatican Library), Seragliensis G. İ. 57 (Istanbul, Library of the Topkapı Palace), and Fabricius 23,2° (Copenhagen, University Library).[24] These three codices were produced under Planudes’ guidance and feature(d) a map of the oikoumene and 26 regional maps.[25] They are the oldest surviving witnesses of Ptolemy’s Geography with maps and at the same time belong to the key witnesses of the textual recension Ω.” (Burri 2018: 228-229)
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We do know that that Planudes made at least four additions, the first three possibly dating from Ptolemy’s era: the Azores archipelago, the Nova Scotia/Prince Edward Island archipelago, the Newfoundland archipelago, and the Newport Tower.
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Planudes used two different latitude schemes on at least two of his maps, the first being the map of the oikoumene and the second being the regional map illustrating the northernmost part of Africa, Spain, and then eastward into the Mediterranean Sea. The first latitude scheme is the Ptolemaic one comprised of parallel, clima, and the associated Ptolemaic latitude value. On the slides this scale is highlighted in yellow.

The second latitude scheme is arrived at by deduction. This scheme is deduced by assigning the actual present-day latitudes for the northern edge of the Straights of Gibraltar (36.0°) and the northern coast of Spain (~43.5°). Historical records inform us that the Straights of Gibraltar latitude was both accurate and well-known back in Antiquity. The plausible presumption is that by the Second Millennium the Ptolemaic inaccuracy of ~45.02° vice ~43.50° had been recognized, corrected, and recorded. One way to test this theory (on any map, not just the 1300 Ptolemy) is to look for a landmark fixed at a known latitude between 36.0° and 43.50°. If one finds the landmark at the correct latitude (positive correlation), then the theory has been tested and validated. We have used this method, specifically in the aforementioned latitude bracket, with success on numerous other 14th and 15th century cartographic works. On the slides this (deduced) scale is always rendered in white.
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Previous Postings:
Slide 13 of 19.
This slide used folio 65v for its construction. What it illustrates, utilizing the Ptolemaic latitude scale, is the Newport Tower. Planudes employed a longitude offset technique to illustrate landforms that belong to North America.

Slide 6 of 19.
This slide used the Ptolemaic latitude scale to zero in on the Newport Tower.

Slide 5 of 19.
This slide used deduced (alternately called the “corrected”) latitude scale to highlight the symbolism associated with the Azores archipelago. In this case, the Azores latitude slots extremely well using the “corrected” scale but it also slots well using the Ptolemaic scale.

Slide 11 of 19.
This slide used the regional map containing the northernmost part of Africa, Spain, and then eastward into the Mediterranean Sea. This slide discusses the Nova Scotia/Prince Edward Island archipelago and the Newfoundland archipelago being illustrated on the 1300 Planudes reconstructed map of Ptolemy.
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References:
-Burri, Renate. “‘Some Notes on the Tradition of the Diagrams (and Maps) in Ptolemy’s Geography.’” Claudio Ptolomeo, Geografía (Capítulos Teóricos), Ed./Transl. R. Ceceña (Mexico City: Facultad De Filosofía y Letras, Universidad Nacional Autónoma De México), 2018, 219–49. https://www.academia.edu/38415932/_Some_Notes_on_the_Tradition_of_the_Diagrams_and_Maps_in_Ptolemy_s_Geography_
-Toomer, G. J. Ptolemy’s Almagest. Princeton, NJ.: Princeton University Press, 1988
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We used this image for the analysis:
https://digi.vatlib.it/view/MSS_Urb.gr.82
This image can be further magnified within your browser.

Slide deck (19 slides):
MS PowerPoint: https://drive.google.com/open?id=15Fb4IZXAv5VXSBcepJ9pvWymcLXMA-aV
PDF: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ApQcnr_tdntDtIa8YaYzo94fB1FV5bEx
 

dreamregent

Ad Honorem
Feb 2013
4,381
Coastal Florida
That is correct, HOWEVER, the map is dated 1490 AD... TWO YEARS BEFORE COLUMBUS. Remember, NO ONE in the America's B4 Columbus. how did they know about the turkey (possibly dodo bird). This picture and map negate any story and now, fake opinions by historians. For these "professionals" to be even considered, they will have to explain (in a peer reviewed opinion) on why they ignored the bird picture. This can't even be classified as "opps, we missed it".
I hate to burst your bubble but....this is simply not a turkey. Several aspects of its anatomy are just plain wrong. If you want to claim it's a species from the Americas, you'd probably get more mileage out of trying to pass it off as a South American rhea, a bird this drawing actually resembles, at least superficially. Although, your claims fail in any case because the feet appear to conclusively prove beyond anyone's ability to refute that this drawing depicts an ostrich. After zooming in, the drawing clearly shows each foot having 2 digits with the inner digit on each foot being much larger and having a prominent claw. This factor alone is definitively diagnostic because this foot structure is unique to the ostrich and is not shared with any other bird on earth. So, it appears to me the case is closed on the identification of this bird...unless of course you can find us another bird with feet like this. ;)
 
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Jul 2018
177
Florida
today's post .....

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Phippsburg History Center

Page Liked · December 3 ·



NEWPORT TOWER
1605 Hans Poulsen Resen Map
Gl. Kgl. Saml. 2876, 4to
Royal Library Copenhagen

This is the first Scandinavian map to depict the Newport Tower. Hans Poulsen Resen’s 1605 work placed one tower in Norumbega, in the middle of the bay, at 43.27° of latitude. He placed a city-scape on the peninsula just to the south. He located the island of Claudia just offshore of the bay. The northerly placement of Claudia and the illustration of the tower within the bay parallels the 1592 Molyneux Globe (Petworth House, England).

Resen located a second tower on the coastline at 41.65° latitude. This rectangular tower, with a turrent, flag, and slanting pole is a classical Newport Tower depiction. The actual latitude of the NT is 41.48° latitude.

Resen’s map, and his tower depictions in North America, are “sparse.” Very simple line drawings which rely upon other drawn features to highlight the structures.

Over in Europe, on the coastal areas of Spain and Portugal, Resen drew more prominent tower structures. The placement of these structures served as a latitudinal cross-reference to the Newport Tower.
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Slide deck (25 slides):
MS PowerPoint: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1yCpeSDCpCB2gBW_B-411xhnRQ67dx17V
PDF: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1UNIcT5laL5T_668DO_l04A8E_enFQOmX
 
Jul 2018
177
Florida
.....So, it appears to me the case is closed on the identification of this bird...unless of course you can find us another bird with feet like this. ;)…..

Missed the point ==== the map is before Columbus..now you've put the map into South America. That just makes the academic BS even worse...Instead of commenting on the birds feet, why don't you trash the Columbus narrative for the stupidity it really is.....and then explain "your thoughts" on how a South American bird wound up on the North American continent. Please include your thoughts on the latitude questions raised by the map.

and instead of messing around Historum with this comment, post it on the Facebook account where all this originates. You'll probably get more response regarding your observations. Please include a narrative regarding the research you did and not forgetting references for identification.

As you can see from these postings, we are in no mood to "mess around". As they say in poker --- "ante up". The facebook site requires a "real name, address, email, etc'. No fakes (pun intended);)
 

dreamregent

Ad Honorem
Feb 2013
4,381
Coastal Florida
Missed the point ==== the map is before Columbus..now you've put the map into South America. That just makes the academic BS even worse...Instead of commenting on the birds feet, why don't you trash the Columbus narrative for the stupidity it really is.....and then explain "your thoughts" on how a South American bird wound up on the North American continent. Please include your thoughts on the latitude questions raised by the map.
Clearly, it doesn't appear you even understood what I wrote. I unequivocally asserted the drawing is of an ostrich from Africa. With my reference to the South American rhea, I merely noted a superficial resemblance. In actuality, the anatomy is wrong for a rhea as well. As for the rest of your agenda, I don't care to comment on it.


and instead of messing around Historum with this comment, post it on the Facebook account where all this originates. You'll probably get more response regarding your observations. Please include a narrative regarding the research you did and not forgetting references for identification.
I'm not going to spend a lot of time on your nonsense but I don't have a problem with citing evidence, peer-reviewed of course. First, see how the feet are depicted in the drawing:

[Carte_marine_de_l'océan_Atlantique_[...]Colomb_Christophe_btv1b59062629_2.jpg


Now, from Plantar pressure distribution of ostrich during locomotion on loose sand and solid ground, we have an anatomical description of ostrich feet in comparison to the feet of other flightless birds (bottom of pg. 3):

The adaptation of rapid locomotion can also be observed in ostrich foot toes. Each ostrich foot has only two digits (the 3rd and 4th toes) covered with closely adherent vertical cornified papillae, whereas other ratites have three digits with simple callous plantar pads (Fowler, 1991).
The paper also includes associated drawings:

Capture-ostrich.PNG


That looks pretty convincing to me. There's no need to construct an elaborate fantasy about the document when a far simpler solution is readily apparent. The drawing on the back of the chart is somewhat crude but it does appear to include diagnostic elements definitive enough to conclude that the bird depicted is an ostrich. If other birds had similar feet, maybe there would be further room for speculation. But no such birds currently exist.
 
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Jul 2018
177
Florida
looks like the map has a three toe bird on it....could you show me a picture of a three toe ostrich.....unless of course, the number of toes don't count in zoology.
 

dreamregent

Ad Honorem
Feb 2013
4,381
Coastal Florida
looks like the map has a three toe bird on it....could you show me a picture of a three toe ostrich.....unless of course, the number of toes don't count in zoology.

Methinks you see things that aren't actually there. And I strongly suspect you do that a lot. Although, I would note your claim of seeing 3 toes also spells doom for your claim that the bird is a turkey...because turkey feet have 4 digits, not 3. ;)