"The Moors civilized Europe" theory

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,760
Cornwall
the Moors in the lands they came from never developed irrigation. But they come to a land where the Romans built fabulous aqueducts to draw water down from the mountains and they develop it. I conside the Visigoths were not too technically savy, but the Romans who still lived in Spain were very smart people. And one thing about the Romans is, they shared ideas.
Most of the muslims in Spain came from..........................................Spain. Same lands, same farmers in most cases, they didn't evaporate. Ruling classes tended to be immigrants although some were Visigothic converted to muslims.

The Visigoths may not have been too techinically savvy, but if you look at the timelines, the 'Romans who still lived in Spain' would have been about 100 years old. The integration of Roman and Visigothic hierarchies was a long-evolving process

I do have a question here though; was Andalusia the cultural capital of Iberia during classical/pagan period? When (if ever) did Barcelona/Catalon/Aragon overtake Andalusia as the cultural capital of Iberia?
The most 'Roman' province, if that's what you mean, was La Betica, which is very roughly (very) Andalusia of today
 
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Nov 2013
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Most of the muslims in Spain came from..........................................Spain. Same lands, same farmers in most cases, they didn't evaporate. Ruling classes tended to be immigrants although some were Visigothic converted to muslims.

The Visigoths may not have been too techinically savvy, but if you look at the timelines, the 'Romans who still lived in Spain' would have been about 100 years old. The integration of Roman and Visigothic hierarchies was a long-evolving process



The most 'Roman' province, if that's what you mean, was La Betica, which is very roughly (very) Andalusia of today
A bit surprised; and yet it is worth noting that Gades (Cadiz) is there, and that Cartagena is perhaps closer to Andalusia than it is to Barcelona. Thanks for the response.
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,760
Cornwall
A bit surprised; and yet it is worth noting that Gades (Cadiz) is there, and that Cartagena is perhaps closer to Andalusia than it is to Barcelona. Thanks for the response.
La Betica was the most extensively romanised, the first, where most of society and most people lived (Trajan, Hadrian came from there) and where all the main economy was. There weren't actually any legions there - there was in the north - so that when once-perfect imperial things started to unravel slightly under Marcus Aurelius and a force of Mauri came over and ravaged La Betica for some time, it caused immense consternation