"The Moors civilized Europe" theory

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,982
Cornwall
The Moors and Arabs were more important in the reintroduction of ancient Greco-Roman knowledge for the posterior than the Byzantines.
That's wrong.
Why? Unlike muslims, the Othodox Chruch was biggot against every aspect of scientific discovery and anciet greco-roman science.
There are indeed theories that the muslims in expansion (via Africa, Spain etc) were indeed the heirs to that Greco-Roman knowledge - and certainly they filled 'Spain' with it, prior to various destructive movements, such as Almanzor, the Almoravids and the later Catholic obsessive book burners!

Whilst Justinian the Great did seem to think everything in the world revolved around Catholicism, at the expense of everything and everybody else
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,459
Portugal
The last Spanish ancient history book I read opined that the 'Celtisation' of Iberia was interupted by the Roman conquest and it deploys maps to show where Celts were (mainly central belts) and where older settlers were.
Yes, I already saw that line about the 'Celtisation' of the Iberian Peninsula, interrupted by the Romans, but in “Protohistoria de la Península Ibérica”, Martín Almagro et al, Ariel, in the chapter “Los Pueblos Prerromanos de la Península”, it is often mentioned the Iberization of some areas, in the Meseta, and in the area of the Turdetanos. If there was a Celtization and a Iberization, something had to be shrinking. There they even consider the Oretanos as Iberian, while in the map that I posted previously they are referred as Celtic speakers.

José Maria Blásquez in “Historia de España Antigua” also considers the Oretanos as Iberians. And he has an extensive chapter about the Celtiberian language, seen as Celtic, but with Iberian influences.

I also saw references to the Túrdulos (Turduli and Turduli Vetere) as Iberians (or at least as pre-Celtic), and again in the map they are referred as Celtic speakers, that seems the new “consensus”.

It is also curious that the Celtics (Celtici) in Alentejo/Algarve seem to be quite disconnected from the other Celtic areas much more to the North and Northeast.

Celtici - Wikipedia

EDIT

Meanwhile, following a footnote, I found and downloaded a series of articles that seem an interesting Reading (both in Spanish and English):

https://www.academia.edu/2183504/Arqueología_de_las_fortificaciones_griegas_III_repercusión_entre_los_Púnicos_Íberos_y_Celtas_repercusión_entre_los_Púnicos_Íberos_y_Celtas

https://www.academia.edu/1855659/Entre_iberos_y_celtas_sobre_santuarios_comunales_urbanos_y_rituales_gentilicios_en_Hispania

https://www.academia.edu/2183529/The_Celts_of_the_Southwestern_Iberian_Peninsula

https://www.academia.edu/23832867/Celtic_Identity_in_the_south-western_Iberian_Peninsula_Cumulative_and_or_Migrations

Los pueblos célticos del suroeste de la Península Ibérica | Semantic Scholar

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6394/687c5b618db76ac1fd02350cd1715d4c5fa5.pdf?_ga=2.131772111.1125881138.1577978069-1175120980.1577978069
 
Last edited:
Aug 2018
697
london
Why? Unlike muslims, the Othodox Chruch was biggot against every aspect of scientific discovery and anciet greco-roman science.
Almost all greek texts we have today are translations direct from Greek, not from Arabic translations.
 
Jan 2020
130
cumberstone
no most came from Greece/Byzantium.
It is not possible, because even in the era of earliest renaissance Constantinaples had not big library anymore (what it used to be before the first millenia) and most of the remaining books were about history (monographs about the deeds of their emperors) or books about religious topics, they had no relationship with science and technology or arts.
 
Last edited:
Sep 2019
486
Slovenia
It is true that during Fourth crusade which turned against Byzantium in 1204 the most important imperial library was burned. Yet very rich libraries remained in Greece. In 1239–1240, the scholar Nikephoros Blemmydes found himself travelling long-distance, across the Aegean, from Asia Minor to Macedonia and Thessaly. He writes 'I spent a long time in these Western parts and worked extremely hard at the study of the books I found there; they were to be found in countless profusion, many of them difficult to find elsewhere, so much so that even the titles of some are unknown to many who have dedicated their lives to study.'


 
Jan 2020
130
cumberstone
It is true that during Fourth crusade which turned against Byzantium in 1204 the most important imperial library was burned. Yet very rich libraries remained in Greece. In 1239–1240, the scholar Nikephoros Blemmydes found himself travelling long-distance, across the Aegean, from Asia Minor to Macedonia and Thessaly. He writes 'I spent a long time in these Western parts and worked extremely hard at the study of the books I found there; they were to be found in countless profusion, many of them difficult to find elsewhere, so much so that even the titles of some are unknown to many who have dedicated their lives to study.'


These books were not about the "evil" ancient sciences.