The Moors In Europe

Nov 2018
11
South Africa
#1
Background To The Moors Rule In Europe

In 639, Arabs came into Africa as part of a Jihad which took over Egypt, Libya and the Maghreb inhabited by indigenous Black peoples that the Romans called Moors.

Around 711, Europe had fallen into a semi-barbarous state since the end of the Roman empire, and there was a surge into Europe via the Sea under the command of the African General Tarik Ibn Ziad who conquered the Visigoth Kings.

The Moors then conquered Europe all the way to Southern France where they were repelled and fell back in Spain, Portugal and Sicily.
https://afrikaiswoke.com/2018/11/28/when-the-moors-ruled-europe/
When The Moors Ruled Europe | Afrika Is Woke
 
Oct 2015
5,221
Matosinhos Portugal
#2
After the Moors were expelled from France Spain Portugal by the Christians returned to North Africa, but in 1415 Portugal conquered Ceuta in North Africa. From here onwards the Portuguese Maritime Discoveries began.

Portugal and Spain can not forget what the Moors left in the Iberian Peninsula, beginning with the words Arab origin, which is mixed in Latin

for example these words of Arab origin- Café - Banana - Cuba ( açucar sugar ) Fortaleza - Alcaide - ( Algodão Cottom ) Xarope - ( Aldeia Village ) ( Arroz Rice )
( Alfândega Customs ) - Albatroz - Algarve etc.etc.etc.

The Moors also contributed to the mosques that today are Catholic churches as well as built castles, the castles built by the Christians are different from the castles built by the Moors, for example the castle of Lisbon is Arabic the castle of Guimarães is Christian city of Guimarães is in the north Portugal as also Spain has Roman bridges and ruins as well as Portugal France etc. as well as the Moors left in Portugal and Spain gastronomy.




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Provérbios populares: letra B
  • Baleias no canal, terás temporal

Popular proverbs: letter B
Whales in the canal, you will have temporal
 
Aug 2018
390
london
#3
the Maghreb inhabited by indigenous Black peoples that the Romans called Moors.
The Moors weren't black, they were north african Berbers and Arabs. They had some black people with them but they were mostly slaves, including slave soldiers.

The idea that the Maghreb was inhabited by black people who were replaced by the current inhabitants is made-up nonsense with no basis in reality. If anything the black presence in North Africa increased over time as a result of the huge trans-saharan slave trade.

'Afrocentrics' use fantasy paintings done in the 19th century by Europeans as evidence for their claims. In reality this is how the Moors were depicted at the time:


Cantigas de Santa Maria, 1221AD


"The Moors then conquered Europe all the way to Southern France"

No they only really conquered Spain and Sicily. They went up into France from Spain but were defeated and driven back, though they held an area on the southwest mediterranean coast of France for about 30 years. They also invaded parts of southern Italy but only held one town (Bari) for about 20 years. They ruled Sicily for about 150 years. They held almost all of Spain for about 20 years, then they gradually lost territory over hundreds of years until they were eventually driven out. This video shows the territory they controlled and the subsequent reconquest by European powers:


These pages have more information on the black slave castes within Berber society:

Haratin - Wikipedia

Ikelan - Wikipedia
 
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Aug 2018
390
london
#4
Around 711, Europe had fallen into a semi-barbarous state since the end of the Roman empire
That's more nonsense.

Here's a map of Europe in 700 AD:



As you can see at this time western Europe was dominated by large states.

The Visigothic Kingdom:

"the Visigoths were preservers of the classical culture.[28] The bathing culture of Andalusia, for example, often said to be a Muslim invention, is a direct continuation of Romano-Visigothic traditions. Visigothic Merida housed baths supplied with water by aqueducts, and such aqueducts are also attested in Cordoba, Cadiz and Recopolis. Excavations confirm that Recopolis and Toledo, the Visigothic capital, were heavily influenced by the contemporary Byzantine architecture.[29] When the Muslims looted Spain during their conquest they were amazed by the fine and innumerable Visigothic treasures.[30] A few of these treasures were preserved as they were buried during the invasion – e.g., the votive crowns from the treasure of Guarrazar.[31] While only the senior monks were allowed to read books of non-Christian or heretic authors[32] this did not prevent the rise of intellectuals like, most prominently, Isidore of Seville, one of the most quoted scholars of the Middle Ages, Eugenius I of Toledo, an expert in mathematics and astronomy, or Theodulf of Orléans, a theologian and poet who, after he had fled to the Frankish kingdom, participated in the Carolingian Renaissance.[33] A Muslim source referred to Visigothic Seville as the "abode of the sciences".[34] The Institutionum disciplinae from the mid seventh/early eight century confirms that Visigothic nobles were not only taught in reading and writing, but also in medicine, law and philosophy.[35] An example of a highly educated nobleman was king Sisebut, who was a patron of learning and writer of poems, one of them about astronomy.[36]"

Visigothic Kingdom - Wikipedia


"The horseshoe arch, also called the Moorish arch and the keyhole arch, is the emblematic arch of Moorish architecture. Horseshoe arches can take rounded, pointed or lobed form.

Horseshoe arches are known from pre-Islamic Syria, where the form was used in the fourth century CE in the Baptistery of Mar Ya'qub (St. Jacob) at Nisibin.[1] However, it was in Spain and North Africa (where it went from Spain) that horseshoe arches developed their characteristic form. Prior to the Muslim invasion of Spain, the Visigoths used them as one of their main architectural features, which may come from at least the Roman period. [...]

The Visigothic form was adopted and developed by the Umayyads, who accentuated the curvature of the horseshoe and used to enclose it in an alfiz to accentuate the effect of its shape. This can be seen at a large scale in their major work, the Great Mosque of Córdoba.[3] This style of horseshoe arch then spread all over the Caliphate and adjacent areas, and was adopted by the successor Muslim emirates of the peninsula, the taifas, as well as by the Almoravid dynasty, Almohad Caliphate, and the Nasrid Kingdom of Granada, although also lobed, round, pointed and multifoil arches were also used at that time. The Mozarabs also adopted this style of arch into their architecture and illuminated manuscripts."

Horseshoe arch - Wikipedia
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,453
Portugal
#5
The OP is mostly an utter nonsense with a racial agenda, full of distorted facts.

The Moors weren't black, they were north african Berbers and Arabs. They had some black people with them but they were mostly slaves, including slave soldiers.
Ario you are mostly righ on your comments, but I would like to note the following:

Word “Moor” comes from “Mauri”, originally means a Berber solely from the actual region of Morocco, and it didn’t include the Arabs. Eventually some black people could have been found among the those Berbers, but the Berbers originally didn’t seem to be black, as we may see looking to the Canaries/Guanches that were maintained apart until the 15th century. But the blacks weren’t necessarily slaves.

In time, in the Iberian Peninsula, and then all over Europe, the word “Moor” gained different connections. In the Iberian Peninsula it was taken as a synonym of “Muslim”, so the Arabs were Moors, and the Islamized peoples of the South East of Asia were also Moors when the Portuguese and the Spanish arrived there. Thus the “Moros”, literally Moors in Spanish, in the south of the Philippines.

In other regions of Europe, it seems that the world also gained another meaning besides “Muslim”, and I have already seen defended here in this forum that it also gained the meaning of “dark skinned”. I am not fully convinced of this idea as wide spread, but let us admit its possibility.

'Afrocentrics' use fantasy paintings done in the 19th century by Europeans as evidence for their claims. In reality this is how the Moors were depicted at the time:
As you pointed out the “Cantigas de Santa Maria” are from the 13th century, but this moors of the 13th century are different from the Moors that arrived to the Iberian Peninsula in the 8th century. In the 13th century these Moors were already equivalent to Muslims, and it would include not only the initial Moors and other Berbers, now totally Islamized, but also Arabs (from Syria to Yemen), and the previous population of Roman-Hispano-Visigoths also Islamized, as well as significant contingents of Islamized Slavs that arrived to the Peninsula as slaves.
 

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