The most profound story of the Bible.

Nov 2019
106
Memphis TN
Imho the most profound story of the Bible is also a secondary one for most people..

The story of the Tower of Babel...

The story of humanity building a tower to heaven. Where god gets mad at humanities audacity and destroys the tower and scatters humanity across the globe. Changing their languages so they cannot cooperate against god again.



Well there are multiple ways to look at everything.. and I find it just amazing that some Bronze Age philosopher was intelligent enough to realize that if distance and language are no longer a barrier. There is nothing humanly can not accomplish...


I think that is amazing...

I think that is an insight that cannot be ignored... it is super sad the biblical narrative chooses to teach the opposite point of view..

From the religious side the story is a cautionary tale.. it teaches that man shouldn’t reach to far.. that progress is or can be a bad thing if not done in the pursuit of godliness.

Thoughts??




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Jul 2019
802
New Jersey
Not history
I don't see why a discussion about the Bible should be any less suitable for this site than a discussion about Chaucer or Confucius or Hammurabi.

With regard to the story, I share the OP's interpretation: the tale is meant to be a note of what humanity can achieve when unified, and a warning that they can also destroy themselves. The 20th Century is the story of the Tower, played out right in front of our eyes.
 
Nov 2019
106
Memphis TN
I don't see why a discussion about the Bible should be any less suitable for this site than a discussion about Chaucer or Confucius or Hammurabi.

With regard to the story, I share the OP's interpretation: the tale is meant to be a note of what humanity can achieve when unified, and a warning that they can also destroy themselves. The 20th Century is the story of the Tower, played out right in front of our eyes.
He is full of it and likely didn’t bother to read the OP...

It is on the foresight of the author nothing supernatural.


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Nov 2019
106
Memphis TN
I don't see why a discussion about the Bible should be any less suitable for this site than a discussion about Chaucer or Confucius or Hammurabi.

With regard to the story, I share the OP's interpretation: the tale is meant to be a note of what humanity can achieve when unified, and a warning that they can also destroy themselves. The 20th Century is the story of the Tower, played out right in front of our eyes.
I think you got me a hair wrong..




I do not think the Bible teaches my interpretation at all.. it only teaches that we should not unify and “reach for the stars/god/whatever “.




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Jul 2019
802
New Jersey
I think you got me a hair wrong..

I do not think the Bible teaches my interpretation at all.. it only teaches that we should not unify and “reach for the stars/god/whatever “.

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I see how I misread you (or rather, carelessly read you). I think the Bible's caution has to do with the crooked timber of the human condition. We have lots of material progress nowadays - in fact more progress than ever before in human history. Are we a happy generation? I would venture to say not. Are we a moral generation? Once again, I will venture to say not. For example (and I'm shooting from the hip with my figures here) the wars and atrocities of the 20th century surely killed more people than the atrocities of the previous thousand years. Material progress not wedded to virtue can have devastating results, the positive side of progress notwithstanding.
 
Aug 2018
582
Southern Indiana
I would disagree. The history of ideas and concepts is just as important as King X destroyed city Y in some ancient time.

The Bible gives us a wonderful window into what people thought in a given period of time.
Then it's philosophy, not ancient history.

Is Noah's Arc history? Is the Garden of Eden history? They are made up stories, parables, not history.