The most profound story of the Bible.

Jul 2019
800
New Jersey
Fables (stories meant to teach a moral) in my experience are not super layered... doing so would kinda pollute the moral it is trying to teach..

The frog and the scorpion is definitely deep, but is it layered with symbolism???


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I won't speak for Aesop, but that was precisely the point I made with regard to the profundity of the story of the Tree of Knowledge. The fable can be simultaneously understood on multiple levels - a child can understand the simple 'disobey God; get punished' idea, while a more mature reader is given a deeper layer to analyze. This is practically a truism in literature; the only place where people seem to have a difficulty with this concept is in the Bible. Surely you don't think that the Rime of the Ancient Mariner is simply Coleridge's depiction of a sea-voyage gone awry? Why should the books which have shaped western civilization (more than any others) be excluded from this literary appreciation?
 
Nov 2019
105
Memphis TN
Job is remarkable.

Since I love prophets, my favor book in the Tanakh is Daniel. You could wonder why not Isaiah ... it's a personal preference probably connected with the interpretation of the dreams [fascinating matter].
I do not see how job was remarkable..

I find it horrific..

God murdered his family and tortured him over a bet...

Then because god gives him a new family, all is considered cool..

AND JOB THANKS HIM FOR IT!!

That is atrocious.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Jul 2019
800
New Jersey
I do not see how job was remarkable..

I find it horrific..

God murdered his family and tortured him over a bet...

Then because god gives him a new family, all is considered cool..

AND JOB THANKS HIM FOR IT!!

That is atrocious.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
That's your overly simplistic reading at work again. The ending chapters of the book (from God's revelation in the whirlwind till Job's confession) are the most powerful thing I've read on theodicy in all my life. The Book of Job is preempting the Stoic idea that God sends us even the most grievous afflictions to make us stronger.
 
Nov 2019
105
Memphis TN
I won't speak for Aesop, but that was precisely the point I made with regard to the profundity of the story of the Tree of Knowledge. The fable can be simultaneously understood on multiple levels - a child can understand the simple 'disobey God; get punished' idea, while a more mature reader is given a deeper layer to analyze. This is practically a truism in literature; the only place where people seem to have a difficulty with this concept is in the Bible. Surely you don't think that the Rime of the Ancient Mariner is simply Coleridge's depiction of a sea-voyage gone awry? Why should the books which have shaped western civilization (more than any others) be excluded from this literary appreciation?


The fact a reader can pull something from it does not mean the author intended that to be the case.
Since we are not talking about history, I do not see how unintended symbolism is relevant..

And there is no way to determine what symbolism is intended and what is not.

Imho the easily understood part is the only relevant part ... well unless the symbolism was intended and so obviously we can accurately say it was put there on purpose..


Look at the Illuminati symbolism crowd...it can be done with anything fro any angle.. I think the symbolism says more about the reader than the author.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Jul 2019
800
New Jersey
The fact a reader can pull something from it does not mean the author intended that to be the case.
Since we are not talking about history, I do not see how unintended symbolism is relevant..

And there is no way to determine what symbolism is intended and what is not.

Imho the easily understood part is the only relevant part ... well unless the symbolism was intended and so obviously we can accurately say it was put there on purpose..


Look at the Illuminati symbolism crowd...it can be done with anything fro any angle.. I think the symbolism says more about the reader than the author.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I don't see why you're assuming the symbolism is unintended, other than your prejudice toward the Bronze Age's understanding of the human psyche. I think it's pretty hard to read the Book of Genesis and not have the various symbolisms jump out at you. Perhaps that has to do with the fact that I read it in the Masoretic Hebrew, but there are so many allegories and archetypes in there that immediately jump out at you. It's hard to avoid, honestly. I guess it has to do with the fact that if you're irreverent and dismissive of the text you won't try to dig any deeper into what it's trying to say.
 
Nov 2019
105
Memphis TN
That's your overly simplistic reading at work again. The ending chapters of the book (from God's revelation in the whirlwind till Job's confession) are the most powerful thing I've read on theodicy in all my life. The Book of Job is preempting the Stoic idea that God sends us even the most grievous afflictions to make us stronger.

So are you saying that god did not murder his family and torture him on a bet???

I think you and other later readers are putting your own personal experience into the intentions of the author..

That is kinda a hitch between Judaism and Christianity as well concerning the OT..

The Jews pay way more attention to what god says first person, unambiguously from “father to sons”..

Then from the Jewish POV , Christians mix and match texts to pull out of it the symbolism they want..

Such as with predictions of the messiah..

Christians claim that Jesus was perfectly predicted if you look at this passage, and that passage independently..

Jews claim “god said thousands of times unambiguously “always obey my laws and never change them.”

They do not think the symbolism approach trumps the first person, unambiguous texts.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Nov 2019
105
Memphis TN
I don't see why you're assuming the symbolism is unintended, other than your prejudice toward the Bronze Age's understanding of the human psyche. I think it's pretty hard to read the Book of Genesis and not have the various symbolisms jump out at you. Perhaps that has to do with the fact that I read it in the Masoretic Hebrew, but there are so many allegories and archetypes in there that immediately jump out at you. It's hard to avoid, honestly. I guess it has to do with the fact that if you're irreverent and dismissive of the text you won't try to dig any deeper into what it's trying to say.
My whole post is about how a Bronze Age philosopher correctly predicted that humanity could achieve anything if languages and distance were not a barrier..

That is a crazy amount of respect for someone with NO way of knowing that..

So I’m not sure how that gels lol.


I am saying that the unambiguous texts trump the symbolism.. and hat ANY symbolism can be pulled out of anything..


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Nov 2019
105
Memphis TN
I don't see why you're assuming the symbolism is unintended, other than your prejudice toward the Bronze Age's understanding of the human psyche. I think it's pretty hard to read the Book of Genesis and not have the various symbolisms jump out at you. Perhaps that has to do with the fact that I read it in the Masoretic Hebrew, but there are so many allegories and archetypes in there that immediately jump out at you. It's hard to avoid, honestly. I guess it has to do with the fact that if you're irreverent and dismissive of the text you won't try to dig any deeper into what it's trying to say.
PS I am not assuming anything.. except what they specifically say.

You are assuming the your interpretation of the symbolism was intended..

I am saying we have no way to know. So it is not relevant unless we did have a way to know.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk