The most stable Southeast Asian country

Apr 2015
166
Philadelphia, Pennysylvania, USA
You can choose which southeast Asian countrythe most stable southeast Asian country. It can be from economy, human health, education, etc
 
Last edited:
Apr 2015
299
Canada
All South Eastern countries except Thailand were colonized for the last 500 years or so until Japan kicked out the white supremacists racist colonizer Imperialists from White Europe, these countries became countries. Since 500 ago, until 70 years ago, they were not nations. People there were not considered to be "human beings". They were treated as "subhumans" "inferior spices". To my knowledge France also was a powerful occupier.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,205
T'Republic of Yorkshire
All South Eastern countries except Thailand were colonized for the last 500 years or so until Japan kicked out the white supremacists racist colonizer Imperialists from White Europe, these countries became countries.
And replaced them with supremacist racist colonizer Imperialists from Japan, one might say.
 
Feb 2015
266
Singapore
You can choose which southeast Asian countrythe most stable southeast Asian country. It can be from economy, human health, education, etc
Note: These are merely what I have observed as a local Singaporean of Chinese descent who had lived here in Southeast Asia all my life, and having travelled to neighboring countries such as Thailand, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam and Malaysia.

I believe the most stable Southeast Asian country in the past few centuries would be Thailand, it was the only independent Southeast Asian country whereas other countries like Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Myanmar and the Philippines were all colonized by the French, Dutch, British and the Spanish respectively.

Thailand might not have been the strongest country in Southeast Asia throughout the past few centuries; and neither is it the richest, but the sheer fact that they even managed to escape Japanese occupation by playing the "neutral party" shows how far they have come.

Not many people are aware of the fact that the Thais are in fact Tai-Kadai speaking migrants who came from Southern China more than 800 years ago owing to the Mongol invasion - most of them have gradually adopted various aspects of the mighty Khmer Empire which eventually weakened due to the increasing competition in the area.

In fact, even today, basic vocabulary in the Thai language is still somewhat mutually intelligible with some dialects of Zhuang (壯語) spoken in Southern China's Guangxi Province (廣西省) bordering Vietnam.

The first Tai-Kadai speakers who arrived in Southeast Asia split off to form three main groups - the Southern/Central Thais who make up the vast majority of Thais in Southeast Asia today, the Northern Thais who set up their own independent kingdom (Lanna) and the Lao who set up the kingdom of Lan Xang.

In between the 1500s and 1700s, Myanmar was the strongest country with the Toungoo Empire becoming the largest ever kingdom in Southeast Asia by land size - surpassing that even of the Khmer Empire, but this was short-lived when the British colonized Myanmar and governed it under British India.

Vietnam was definitely one of the most unstable countries in Southeast Asia with the Chinese incorporating Vietnam as a part of China for a total of 1104 years throughout 4 periods of occupation known as Bac Thuoc (北屬), and they were later colonized by the French and occupied by the Japanese after their short date with independence before Civil War broke out between the communists in North Vietnam and the American-occupied south.

In conclusion, I'd say that both Myanmar and Cambodia were the strongest Southeast Asian countries in terms of expanding their empire and developing their culture; but these two countries have fallen short of their neighbors in recent years owing to political upheavals and oppressive regimes taking hold within the country.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Aupmanyav

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,169
Lisbon, Portugal
The most stable Southeast Asian country is, without a doubt, Singapore. The other can be Brunei.
 
Dec 2012
541
wasent Thailand left independent so that it would act as a buffer between British India and French Indochina?
 
Feb 2015
266
Singapore
The most stable Southeast Asian country is, without a doubt, Singapore. The other can be Brunei.
Indeed, both Singapore and Brunei are far richer than their Southeast Asian counterparts with Singapore alone having the world's 9th highest GDP per capita at US$56,319 and Brunei having the world's 25th highest GDP per capita at US$36,606.

In comparison, Malaysia's GDP per capita sits at the world average of around US$10,803 , Thailand at US$5444, Indonesia at US$3533, the Philippines at US$2865, Vietnam at US$2052, Laos at US$1692, Myanmar at US$1221 and Cambodia at US$1080.

Interestingly, Singapore with it's meager population of around 5.4 million has a total GDP twice that of Vietnam with it's population of around 90 million, and a total GDP 20 times that of Cambodia despite the fact that Cambodia has a population of more than 15 million.

In recent years however, crime and corruption is becoming a serious problem for Malaysia as cities such as Kuala Lumpur, Petaling Jaya and Johor Bahru have been constantly ranked as having one of Southeast Asia / East Asia's highest crime rates after Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Singapore in comparison enjoys one of the world's lowest crime rates at 0.2 intentional homicides per 100,000 individuals.

Singapore and Brunei are where they are today mainly due to their strategic location; Singapore is located right smack in the centre of trading routes between East and West, Brunei on the other hand has been sitting on one of Asia's biggest oil reserves, where hundreds of oil rigs have been dug just off the shores of Borneo.

However, the sustainability of such economic growth in both Singapore and Brunei is questionable - especially with the rise of China both as an economic and as a military power. Shanghai has surpassed Singapore to become Asia's biggest sea port not too long ago and China's aggressive expansionist policies have seen its' government making ridiculous claims to all of the islands in the South China Sea, where most of Brunei's oil reserves are from.

As a result, the Singaporean government has been looking for various ways to keep our economy relevant to the region's needs, and to nurture a future generation that is both versatile and possesses the ability to act as a middleman bridging the East and the West.
 
Last edited:

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,020
Lorraine tudesque
Note: These are merely what I have observed as a local Singaporean of Chinese descent who had lived here in Southeast Asia all my life, and having travelled to neighboring countries such as Thailand, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam and Malaysia.

I believe the most stable Southeast Asian country in the past few centuries would be Thailand, it was the only independent Southeast Asian country whereas other countries like Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Myanmar and the Philippines were all colonized by the French, Dutch, British and the Spanish respectively.

Thailand might not have been the strongest country in Southeast Asia throughout the past few centuries; and neither is it the richest, but the sheer fact that they even managed to escape Japanese occupation by playing the "neutral party" shows how far they have come.

Not many people are aware of the fact that the Thais are in fact Tai-Kadai speaking migrants who came from Southern China more than 800 years ago owing to the Mongol invasion - most of them have gradually adopted various aspects of the mighty Khmer Empire which eventually weakened due to the increasing competition in the area.

In fact, even today, basic vocabulary in the Thai language is still somewhat mutually intelligible with some dialects of Zhuang (壯語) spoken in Southern China's Guangxi Province (廣西省) bordering Vietnam.

The first Tai-Kadai speakers who arrived in Southeast Asia split off to form three main groups - the Southern/Central Thais who make up the vast majority of Thais in Southeast Asia today, the Northern Thais who set up their own independent kingdom (Lanna) and the Lao who set up the kingdom of Lan Xang.

In between the 1500s and 1700s, Myanmar was the strongest country with the Toungoo Empire becoming the largest ever kingdom in Southeast Asia by land size - surpassing that even of the Khmer Empire, but this was short-lived when the British colonized Myanmar and governed it under British India.

Vietnam was definitely one of the most unstable countries in Southeast Asia with the Chinese incorporating Vietnam as a part of China for a total of 1104 years throughout 4 periods of occupation known as Bac Thuoc (北屬), and they were later colonized by the French and occupied by the Japanese after their short date with independence before Civil War broke out between the communists in North Vietnam and the American-occupied south.

In conclusion, I'd say that both Myanmar and Cambodia were the strongest Southeast Asian countries in terms of expanding their empire and developing their culture; but these two countries have fallen short of their neighbors in recent years owing to political upheavals and oppressive regimes taking hold within the country.
Neutral party?

Did you not hear about Koh Chang?

[ame="http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bataille_de_Koh_Chang"]Bataille de Koh Chang ? Wikipédia[/ame]