The Nuragic Civilization

Aug 2018
220
Italy
==Nuraghe Longu, Isili==

This nuraghe is made up of a central tower or mast connected with two additional towers, the elegant tholos of the central tower is still intact








==Nuraghe Biriu, Genoni==

The Nuraghe Biriu is located about 3 km north-east of Genoni. It presents a complex plant with a concentric addition, difficult to read due to the collapses and dense vegetation that covers the ruins; it is not yet possible to establish whether it is a three-lobed (three towers) or four-lobed structure. The chamber of the central tower is still intact for a height of 6 m.







==Nuraghe Nuraceddu, Gesturi==


The Nuraceddeu nuraghe shows a curious stone worked and shaped in such a way, to make the connection between the straight part of the bastion and one of the nuragic towers. It is a real "special nuragic piece" for construction. It is a complex nuraghe (a nuraghe with multiple towers)
This nuraghe, which could reserve other interesting things, is located in the territory of Gesturi:





 
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Aug 2018
220
Italy
Back of the nuragic statuette recently discovered at Bithia:




Detail of one of the two archers from Sardara:



Nuragic buttons from Populonia, Tuscany:





A nuragic bottom with some very interesting figurines and symbolism, a man, an animal (either a goat or a bull) with a four-lobed nuraghe on top of its head, this interesting artifact was found in Cerveteri, Latium:



 
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Aug 2018
368
london
Are the Sardinian Nuraghes actually older than the similar Mycenaean buildings, or about the same age? I'm finding conflicting info online. Where do you think this style of architecture originated? Anatolia, Greece, Sardinia...?
 
Aug 2018
220
Italy
Are the Sardinian Nuraghes actually older than the similar Mycenaean buildings, or about the same age? I'm finding conflicting info online. Where do you think this style of architecture originated? Anatolia, Greece, Sardinia...?
The earliest type of the nuraghi are usually dated to the 19th-18th century bc. The monotower tholos nuraghi are generally dated to the 16th-15th century bc while the complex nuraghi (with multiple towers and sometimes layers of walls) are dated to the 14th-13th century bc. This is the chronology modern archaeologists are using. The cyclopean Mycenaean buildings seem to be roughly contemporary to the tholos nuraghi and the complex nuraghi. The tholos most commonly employed by the Nuragics is an open air tholos, usually supporting at least another tholos on top of it, but they also used undeground tholoi in their well temples (with usually an open air tholos on top of the undergrond one), while the Mycenaeans used exclusively underground tholoi for their tombs.
The corbel arch seems to be the most similar architectural element used by the two civilizations, along with a few Eastern Mediterranean examples from other cultures (Ugarit and Hattusa). It is true that the corbel arch seems to have been adopted by the Nuragic and Mycenaean and to a lesser extent by the Hittites and Ugaritics, roughly around the same time (14-13th century bc), though from what I understand the Nuragics employed it on a massive scale with hundred of recorded cases, and possibly slightly earlier, since monuments like Santu Antine are dated to the 15th-14th century bc, while the walls of Tyrins and Hattusa for example date to the 13th century bc.
 
Aug 2018
220
Italy
Do you know if the architecture have precedents in the middle east/Levant (other than anatolia)?
The corbel arch? I don't remember of any, and even in Anatolia the oldest I can think of are the 13th century bc ones from the galleries in Hattusa and in the corbelled chamber tomb in Hattusa. The should be a few older examples in Syria and Palestine but I can't find any pictures depicting them.

==Nuraghe Rio Perdosu, Domusdemaria==

A monotower nuraghe, located on a rocky cliff, controlling the sea.

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Reconstruction of Nuraghe Santu Antine

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Nuraghe Santu Antine now:

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==Nuraghe Ruinas, Arzana==

The nuragic complex of Ruinas is located on a quote of 1197 meters above the sea level. The complex consists of a very large settlement made up of at least 220 stone dwellings and a complex nuraghe, which means its population would have likely consisted of at least 1,200 inhabitants.
The nuraghe consists of a mast surrounded by three towers and it aso contains an internal courtyard. In the settlement there are the also remains of a rectangular building (30mx20m) and a holy well.

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Aug 2018
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Italy
PYLA-KOKKINOKREMOS, CYPRUS, late 13th century bc, not just nuragic vases: The Sardinians also repaired other objects other than their own. "The bath tub was mended with two plaques of lead in the typical" Sardinian way: lead was melted and poured into the break. The metal was flattened on both sides and the side of the hole. The use of a clay vase means that it was cheaper and more convenient to use this metal, which must have been plentiful. A similar method of mending was discovered on the site in 2010 when wecame upon a Sardinian transport amphora. Analysis of the clay showed that the pot was of Sardinian origin. Moreover, lead isotope analysis has clearly indicated that the metal used also came from Sardinia. The bath tub seems to be a local product, however. The fact that lead to the well-known krater from Pyla were found in Sector 3 (see above), shows that at the Pyla there were people who could be the clay pots either the Cretan / Mycenaean way or the Sardinian way. It is interesting that the bath tub of R. 4.2.6, although a Cypriot vessel, is mended in the Sardinian way. This suggests a mixture in the population. If clay analysis verifies the Minoan provenance of the amphoraid krater from Sector 5 (see below), then we will have the paradox that to Minoan vessel is mended the Sardinian way and not the Aegean way ". From: Bretschneider, Joachim, Athanasia Kanta, and Jan Driessen. "Pyla-Kokkinokremos (Cyprus): preliminary report on the 2015-2016 Campaigns." UGARIT-FORSCHUNGEN 48 (2017): 39-120

Pyla-Kokkinokremos (Cyprus). Preliminary Report on the 2015-2016 Campaigns


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Aug 2018
220
Italy
Analysis of the clay showed that the pot was of Sardinian origin. Moreover, lead isotope analysis has clearly indicated that the metal used also came from Sardinia. The bath tub seems to be a local product, however. The fact that lead to the well-known krater from Pyla were found in Sector 3 (see above), shows that at the Pyla there were people who could be the clay pots either the Cretan / Mycenaean way or the Sardinian way.
*there were people who could mend the clay pots either in the Cretan/Mycenaean way or the Sardinian way

==Nuraghe San Marco, Genuri==

The archaeological monument, has already been the subject of three archaeological survey campaigns, the first launched in January 2001 ended in July of the following year, the second, from March to September 2003 and the third, begun in May 2005 is underway (it will run until December 2006).
The San Marco nuragic complex is composed of a polylobed structure (three lateral towers) which includes: a central tower - the highest point of the surviving monument - (Torre A or mastio) and three side towers, located north-west (Torre B) respectively and to the southwest (Tower C) compared to the central one; the third tower (Torre F), visibly smaller than the other two and positioned so as to produce a smaller convexity in the external profile of the monument, constitutes the south-eastern edge of the complex. Tower A is the largest and was probably the original nucleus of the entire complex. Around it was subsequently built the rest of the structure (3 peripheral towers and a series of mighty rectilinear curtain walls connecting them).
The space inside the monument includes a courtyard, with the usual sickle shape and internal corridors, to allow communication between the side towers and the keep. The boundary belt, emerged along the western and south side of the monument, includes three towers, the first of which (Tower D) located west of the monument, at a distance of 5 m. ca. from its western curtain, between Tower B and Tower C; the second (Torre E) is located to the southwest of the Torre C; the third (Torre G) is south of the southern curtain of the nuraghe. The three tholoi are joined by strong rectilinear walls. Immediately to the east of the Torre G and of which only the eastern part of its thick perimeter wall can be read, there is a fourth tower, called Torre H, whose complete outcrop will be allowed by the continuation of the excavations.
The nuraghe has obviously been dismantled through the centuries and the upper floors are completely missing.


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