The Origin of the Rank "Lieutenant"

Jul 2018
205
London
#1
Another video available.
This time we are discussing the origin of the rank "lieutenant". As usual, the name hints to the function and there are small discoveries to make.
Enjoy!

 

Pendennis

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,379
Kirkcaldy, Scotland
#2
WELL. 'LIEU' IS FRENCH FOR 'PLACE +' TENANT = HOLDER-SO LITERALY 'LIEUTENANT MEANS' PLACEHOLDER' IN FRENCH'. ALTHOUGH I ADMIT THAT DOES NOT EXPLAIN ITS MILITARY USE IN VARIOUS ARMIES I.E. German =Leutnant' in the British Army the word is pronounced ' LEFFtenant- in contast to the American LOOtenant ' pronounciation.
Other French terms used in the British Army are 'AIDE DE CAMP=Commander's right hand man in admin matrers..are used .
'Brevet' is another French word used in both the American and British Armies from the 19th century onwards.' I.E. Brevet Major'' etc.
'Bivouac' sounds French but is German in origin..
I am suprised that the German term 'SCHWERPUNKT= the point of massive force being applied /concentrated during a major attack- hsa not also slipped into more regular Anglo-American mliltary nomenclature.
 
Jul 2018
205
London
#3
WELL. 'LIEU' IS FRENCH FOR 'PLACE +' TENANT = HOLDER-SO LITERALY 'LIEUTENANT MEANS' PLACEHOLDER' IN FRENCH'. ALTHOUGH I ADMIT THAT DOES NOT EXPLAIN ITS MILITARY USE IN VARIOUS ARMIES I.E. German =Leutnant' in the British Army the word is pronounced ' LEFFtenant- in contast to the American LOOtenant ' pronounciation.
.
1
That is exactly the curious thing! The English word derives from French but, given the Latin common root, in many European languages the word is very similar!
And actually LOOtenant is really funny ...

I have some other similar content here, if you are interested.
 

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