The Popularity of Chiamus in the Ancient World

Jax

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
6,347
Seattle
Just read this article on Chiamus in ancient Greek and Latin literature

https://chiasmusresources.org/sites/default/files/09_john_w._welch_chiasmus_in_ancient_greek_and_latin_1981.pdf

I seem to recall reading somewhere that chiasms fell out of general popularity in the 1st century having been very popular in the 1st century BCE and never really came back as a popular style thereafter. This seems to be confirmed by the sparse usage by writers like Seneca. Are there any other good articles that you know of on this subject?
 
Sep 2019
46
Toronto
Seneca must have been a strong writer. There are even colleges named after Seneca. Well, I didn't know what chiasmus is, so I looked it up.

chiasmus - a rhetorical or literary figure in which words, grammatical constructions, or concepts are repeated in reverse order, in the same or a modified form; e.g. ‘Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.’.
 
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Mar 2013
1,038
Breakdancing on the Moon.
Do you want studies just on chiasmus or on the development of rhetorical tropes (and their decline) in Latin?

The book GOLDEN LATIN ARTISTRY is a good place to begin. This covers the 'golden' age of Latin literature and style, which the so called silver age writers like Seneca were emulating and reacting to. Seneca, Lucan, Persius et c were all a lot more formalistic and rhetorical than e.g Virgil or Ovid, and it shows.

Then there's a book called THE JEWELLED STYLE or something, which specifically looks at late antique poetic styles and has a great bibliography.