The Rise of Alt-Rock in the Early 90's: A Revolution in Music

Was the rise of Alt-Rock in the Early 90's a Revolutionary Event?

  • Yes

    Votes: 13 56.5%
  • No

    Votes: 10 43.5%

  • Total voters
    23
  • Poll closed .
Mar 2010
1,316
Ohio
#41
True, but that's just because culture, like technology, is changing quicker. Grunge also shaped the structure of rock music up to the modern day. That's why modern rock is usually referred to as post-grunge.
I think culturally we are evolving slower. This is due consolidation in the media that started to take place in the 90's. More concerned with the bottom line, records companies are no longer looking to take a chance on the next big thing, but simply looking for the safest thing. Looking back between the years 1960 until the early 90's you seemed to have some new movement or sub-genre popping up every few years. Yet now, almost twenty years later, the most commercially successful form of rock is still 'Post-Grunge'. Not to say there isn't good stuff out there, just takes a bit of effort in finding it. The rise of the internet has helped, but I don't think it has been as revolutionary in the evolution of music as some have made it. Possibly it's helped the devolution of modern music. (With MP3's the singles are now once again more dominate than the the album)

I still see teenagers today dressing in what we called 'droops' (wearing jeans below the ass), they were doing this when I was Junior High school, and I'm getting gray in my whiskers.
 
Nov 2012
766
#42
It was revolutionary in every sense of that word, even tho it led to the weakening of the rock music.

Who would've thought in 1989 that four years latter Whitesnake would not exist, Def Leppard wouldn't sell 10's of millions copies of their newest album, Jon Bon Jovi would cut his hair and that Poison and Motley Crue would try to become "serious" bands - ditching their sex & party lyrics?

Also, it led to more rhythmic and less melodic music being accepted in the mainstream (tho the rising of hip hop and rap helped). Dynamics became more important than grandiosity and layering, producion became more dry, and less dense, positive outlook in lyrics was changed into more introspective and dark, and angst bacame more prevalent.
Girls, love, partying and sex stopped being dominant themes, and power ballads suffered a huge decline in popularity. I would also note that guitar playing lost a lot of prestige and talent during the 90's.

90's rock started as a counter-cultural phenomenon, and very fast it became a prt of the estabilishment. 80's rock was different - while it NEVER rejected the values of its decade, and tried its best to be accepted by all, it was the dark side of the 80's with accompanying scene (sex, drugs and rock n roll)
 
Jun 2013
6,340
USA
#43
Who would've thought in 1989 that four years latter Whitesnake would not exist, Def Leppard wouldn't sell 10's of millions copies of their newest album, Jon Bon Jovi would cut his hair and that Poison and Motley Crue would try to become "serious" bands - ditching their sex & party lyrics?

Also, it led to more rhythmic and less melodic music being accepted in the mainstream (tho the rising of hip hop and rap helped). Dynamics became more important than grandiosity and layering, producion became more dry, and less dense, positive outlook in lyrics was changed into more introspective and dark, and angst bacame more prevalent.
Girls, love, partying and sex stopped being dominant themes, and power ballads suffered a huge decline in popularity. I would also note that guitar playing lost a lot of prestige and talent during the 90's.
I was born in the 90s and I wish 80s style rock would come back. The lack of guitar solos in most modern rock disappoints me.
 

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
#46
Do you mean nobody in this thread, or nobody anywhere?
Yes....in a world of 7 billion, I am saying that nobody anywhere knows anything about this topic. ;) :p

But no, I'm just teasing the individuals who think it all started in 1991. What do the Brits call it, "Taking a p*ss"? :D
 
Nov 2012
766
#47
While "alternative" rock always existed as the alternative to more popular rock of the day, the OP stated that this topic was about the rise of alt rock in the early 90's - so we are talking about that specific genre (wheter you call it indie, grunge or whatever)
 
Mar 2010
1,316
Ohio
#48
Yes....in a world of 7 billion, I am saying that nobody anywhere knows anything about this topic. ;) :p

But no, I'm just teasing the individuals who think it all started in 1991. What do the Brits call it, "Taking a p*ss"? :D
I know what you mean, the majority of people still see Elvis as the man who invented Rock N Roll, ignoring the great generation of black musicians of the post war era who were doing the same thing Elvis did, a decade before Elvis did. Bands like REM, Chilli Peppers, The Cure had some success prior to the 90's, but the majority of alt-rockers at this time were relegated to the lower frequencies on your FM dial. After Nirvana hit, there were dozens of bands, who spent years on the college circuit (The Pixies, Sonic Youth) getting mainstream exposure.
 
Last edited:
Jun 2013
6,340
USA
#50
I know what you mean, the majority of people still see Elvis as the man who invented Rock N Roll, ignoring the great generation of black musicians of the post war era who were doing the same thing Elvis did, a decade before Elvis did. Bands like REM, Chilli Peppers, The Cure had some success prior to the 90's, but the majority of alt-rockers at this time were relegated to the lower frequencies on your FM dial. After Nirvana hit, there were dozens of bands, who spent years on the college circuit (The Pixies, Sonic Youth) getting mainstream exposure.
I realize that alt-rock started before 1991, it just wasn't quite mainstream until then.
 

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