The Templar treasure of Oak Island

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,920
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#1
I've been following a TV series about the researches of the treasure of Oak Island. They have focused their attention on a well which reaches an underwater chamber ...

Now, frankly speaking ... are they really thinking that Templars, able to cross the ocean, hided a "treasure" in a place which was to be underwater? Are they serious? I don't need to be a member of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta [so an Order which inherited something from the Temple] to suspect they are following a false path.

My educated guess is that if there is a treasure on Oak Island ... it's not underwater, but underground. I would suggest to those guys to excavate a bit.
 
Nov 2010
7,547
Cornwall
#2
It's well documented that the Templars had many secrets of architecture, construction and that sort of thing. There's also a raft of theories about Templar treasure heading off via La Rochelle and/or Portugal to Scotland and hence, via the Sinclairs, to points further west

If the 'Money Pit' ever held any treasure Colonial, Templar or pirate - presumably it did otherwise and incredible effort for a hoax - in my opinion the many decades of excavation have ruined any chances - I don't think it's possible to excavate any more!

I'm not sure the Knights of Malta - the Knights of the Order of St John of Jerusalem, which still exists in one form - would thank you for the Templar comparison
 
Mar 2017
869
Colorado
#3
It's easy to write of Oak Island's Money Pit as an elaborate hoax. I have no idea what it is and have never seen a satisfactory explanation. There's no solid evidence of anything, which allows wild speculation.

What's there:
A deep pit, divided into sections by several platforms of logs
It was booby trapped with an Indiana Jones type mechanism: breaking through a layer of logs caused an underground canal to flood the place ... they've verified the sea connection with dye
Early on, they just drilled to the bottom and found a coin ... maybe a doubloon? ... a single coin
They've found other artifacts, but the details are muddled: did they find the sword & the carved rock in the pit, or nearby? There's other random stuff: no cogent story.

It's called the "Money Pit" not for what might be in it, but for all the money that's been poured into it.

The constant excavations continue for the same practical question that EVERYONE has: "if they went to so much trouble to protect it, shouldn't there be something there?"

What if there WAS a treasure that was cleverly protected ... then the guy that hid it & knew the booby trap retrieved it before others started digging? No good reason to waste time "undoing" all the work. Just sayin' .....
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,398
Portugal
#5
I don't need to be a member of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta [so an Order which inherited something from the Temple] to suspect they are following a false path.
The Order of Malta, or better the Hospitaliers, just “inherited” some (most) of the assets of the Templars, but basically they were a competitor that helped in their downfall.

There's also a raft of theories about Templar treasure heading off via La Rochelle and/or Portugal to Scotland and hence, via the Sinclairs, to points further west
The end of the order in Portugal has no many secrets and it is relatively well studied. With a wise move from the Portuguese king D. Dinis and with the necessary papal approval the assets and the human resources of the order in Portugal were converted into the Order of Christ. A similar process happened in Aragon with the formation of the order of Montesa. All in other places in Europe the Templar assets went to the Hospitaliers or maybe disappeared.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,847
US
#6
Stop watching trash TV

The Templars never crossed the Atlantic.
I don't know. I have watched some of these documentaries. Perhaps not them but their successors. Was the Templar treasure merely material wealth or wealth and knowledge?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,398
Portugal
#7
I don't know. I have watched some of these documentaries. Perhaps not them but their successors. Was the Templar treasure merely material wealth or wealth and knowledge?
That the Templars had wealth, that is undisputable, they were bankers of many including the Pope and the king of France, but knowledge? What type of knowledge are you thinking about?
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,847
US
#8
That the Templars had wealth, that is undisputable, they were bankers of many including the Pope and the king of France, but knowledge? What type of knowledge are you thinking about?
Some of the documentaries I have seen imply that they had picked up much ancient wisdom through the Islamic world, information Islam had garnered and saved from the ancient Greeks and Romans. One spoke about navigation and navigational tools. One documentary even speculated that such knowledge aided Columbus in his first journey. All speculative but interesting.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,398
Portugal
#9
Some of the documentaries I have seen imply that they had picked up much ancient wisdom through the Islamic world, information Islam had garnered and saved from the ancient Greeks and Romans. One spoke about navigation and navigational tools. One documentary even speculated that such knowledge aided Columbus in his first journey. All speculative but interesting.
TV documentaries seek audiences, sometimes I think that they seem to imply all that can raise audiences.

The issue is that the Templars downfall happened with many accusations and with the loss of many archives that opened a window to huge speculations and alternative realities. Furthermore in general they are a less researched order than many others (such as the Hospitaliers). Even so the facts are much smaller that those wild goose chasings. When we don’t know we tend to create. And thus the Templars remain a good theme to many published books about their “secrets”, “rituals” and hidden treasures, and those books (and documentaries) seem to continue to sell well. They continue to be a trend in the Pop culture history.

Among others, one of the biggest serious researchers about the Templars order, the military orders in general, the French historian and medievalist Alain Demurger, has been fighting all that invasion of the pop fiction into history for some years, but sometimes I think he is a kind of Don Quijote fighting real windmills.

If you like the theme, you have an outstanding online e-book, at LIBRO, free and in English, “Templars in the Corona de Aragón”, by the English historian Alan J. Forey, also a Medievalist, expert in military orders, that albeit being about the Templars presence in the East of the Iberian Peninsula, also gives an overall historical vision about the order without fantasies: The Templars in the Corona de Aragn -- Master Page
 
Likes: Rodger

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,920
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#10
A part the possibility [or not] that the Templars crossed the Atlantic, that research of a treasure [if there is any] on that isle is totally wrong [and a waste of money and time].

If who put there a treasure decided for real to put it in a hall under the level of the sea, protecting it flooding all ... well, that guy was insane. Let's think for a moment to the nature of this "treasure". If there were documents to put them in the sea water would have been an idiot idea. If there were only precious objects to put them in the sea water would have been a less idiot idea, but anyway idiot ...

No. That underground system of tunnels is there to divert the attention [or it's there because of other reasons, but sure not to hide a treasure].

The treasure is above the level of the sea. If there is a treasure. No doubt. Probably in the forest.
 

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