The three greatest monarchs ever lived!

Sep 2010
3,538
Somewhere in the former First French Empire
#1
If you take the whole course of history and all the countries of the world. Which monarchs are in your opinion then the greatest of them all? So don't only look at his conquests but also to what he left behind.

My own top 3 would be:

1. Napoleon I Bonaparte
- He left a perminent footstep on Europe. His reforms would change Europe for ever. The old order was swept away and a new life started for the Europeans. His political believes still form the basis of many countries in Europe. Besides he was the best military mastermind ever lived.

2. William I of Orange
- He is the founding father of my country. He was the first who said no to the oppresive rule of Spain. He supported freedom of religion all over the Republic. Without his will the Netherlands may not have been formed.

3. Frederick II Hohenzollern
- He reformed and bettered the lives of his subjects without being asked, but purely out of good will. He was one of the best military commanders and was a very educated man.


The power of the Monarchy:

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFj0e5dwkwE&list=FLMod4PEVgWEcWW1ki2VEbXA&index=2&feature=plpp_video"]ROZE, Abbé - Vivat, vivat in aeternum for Napoleon´s coronation - YouTube[/ame]
 
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Rongo

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,683
Ohio
#2
Good choices. I would add Elizabeth I of England, for bringing religious tolerance to that country and reigning over an era of stability and strength (all relatively speaking, of course).

 
Jan 2011
821
Boston
#3
Little biased on my end, but I would posit Trajan, M. Aurelius, and Qing Shenzu (Kangxidi, the Kangxi Emperor).

Trajan:

His building projects were astounding, and he brought the Roman Empire to its largest extent, finally dealing a crushing blow to those pesky Persians. He continued the process of adopting the next heir, as opposed to leaving the empire to a blood relative, thus continuing the period of succession known as the Five Good Emperors. He put down two of the biggest threats to Rome, being Dacia and Persia. Dacia was one of the only semi-barbarian kingdoms that actually posed a threat to Roman interests.

Marcus Aurelius

Granted, a lot of people argue that he is overrated, and make some good points. However, as long as this is a question of personal opinion, I stand by Marcus. His tenure over the empire was troubled in ways no previous emperor had faced since the succession crises. His personal ethic is legendary- he did not send his soldiers to fight in far off corners of the empire alone. He accompanied them. He was more than willing to share imperial power as necessary. He waged successful campaigns in the East against the resurgent Persians. He died as he lived- alongside his men, likely due to a plague he refused to flee from.

The Kangxi Emperor

Another monarch I just happen to like a lot. Regarded as one of the best emperors in Chinese history, the Kangxi emperor was, at heart, a bit of a poet. This did not stop him from crushing revolts and winning a series of border conflicts with Russia. Unlike later Qing rulers, he did not isolate his nation from foreign influence, and this benefited the Qing both militarily and scientifically. He helped make the Qing economy more efficient and contributed mightily to the arts and to education.
 
Aug 2011
4,213
Gaillimh (Ireland)
#5
My three picks:

Louis XI of France:he transformed France into one of the most centralized states in Europe by decreasing the influence of the great feudal nobles; by doing so he also laid the foundations for the Ancièn Regime.
His diplomatic skills proved to be superior to the Burgundian military machine and the constant Eglish threat.



Emperor Meiji:during his reign,Japan started as a feudal shogunate and ended up being one of the most powerful and advanced nation on Earth.
He also decisively defeated the two great rivals of his nation:China and Russia.



Roger II of Sicily: he completed the unification of Southern Italy under the Norman rule,he successfully crushed both internal and foreign opposition and was crowned "Rex Siciliae ducatus Apuliae et principatus Capuae"(king of Sicily,duke of Apulia and prince of Capua) by the Pope himself.
By the end of his life,the Norman rule was extended even to Corfu,Malta and all the African lands from Tunis to Tripoli.
 
May 2011
389
New England
#6
Was Napoleon a monarch? If so, then I'd say that Tokugawa Ieyasu should be included too. But, Tokugawa wasn't a monarch. As far as military leaders go, there's a lot to compare between Napoleon and Tokugawa, but Tokugawa brought a centuries-long period of peace and prosperity to his people while Napoleon got sent to Saint Helena. I wouldn't call either of them monarchs, though.
 
Sep 2010
3,538
Somewhere in the former First French Empire
#7
Was Napoleon a monarch? If so, then I'd say that Tokugawa Ieyasu should be included too. But, Tokugawa wasn't a monarch. As far as military leaders go, there's a lot to compare between Napoleon and Tokugawa, but Tokugawa brought a centuries-long period of peace and prosperity to his people while Napoleon got sent to Saint Helena. I wouldn't call either of them monarchs, though.
Napoleon was crowned Emperor in 1804. So yes he was a Monarch.
 

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
#10
If I crown myself "Emperor" does that make me a monarch? ;)
How dare you impugn those that declare themselves Emperor!

I choose one, because one is all that is needed. The one true Emperor of the United States:

Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico


(I just love this guy)
 

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