The three pillars of medieval society. Divinely inspired?

May 2019
5
Poland
#1
Hey guys,

I was just wondering if I have this correct. I don't even know where I got this from exactly but I always thought that the three pillars of society in the medieval period was thought of as the will of God. Is this true ? Was it an official doctrine of the church ? If it wasn't an official doctrine was it believed to be the will of God by the people in general? I know that if you were born as a peasant in the medieval period people used to think that is what God wanted you to be and you should be happy with your lot, otherwise you were sinning. If you were born a King it was because God picked you to rule, but does this also mean that the three pillars of society in the medieval period was seen by the Church or made by the Church to be the official three classes of society because God inspired it to be so. A bit confused here. Some input would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers,

PaxOttomana
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,254
Australia
#4
The concept of a tripartite society was adopted all over the world. In Europe it was called the "three orders" not the "three pillars" and referred to workers, fighters, and clerics. The idea was first outlined at the beginning of the 11th century by two independent writers; Bishop Adalbero of Laon and Gerard of Cambrai. It was called "three pillars" in India and referred to village, caste, and family.
 
Likes: Edratman
May 2019
5
Poland
#6
I got that part lol. Dan Howard's reply was much more helpful.

Before the 11th century this idea of the tripartite society had a more organic growth and implementation since it was known also in the other parts of the world. Some of my questions are still unanswered, maybe you guys can budge in. Was the tripartite society thought to be the will of God ? Divinely inspired ? What was the stance of the Catholic church on the tripartite society before writers such as Bishop Adalbero of Laon and Gerard of Cambrai ? Obviously it existed before these writers came about and they were just observing something that had already existed, but I am interested what the Curch's stance was on this system before and after the two writers Dan Howard mentioned.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,195
Portugal
#8
Anybody know a book I can read to find out the answers myself ?
Probably in a work of several authors, directed by Jacques Le Goff: “L'Homme medieval” (The Medieval Man).

It was translated to several languages, so probably it will be not hard to find a translation to English, or even to Polish, since I saw that you are from Poland:

https://www.amazon.fr/LHomme-médiéval-Jacques-Goff/dp/2020222116

Or George Duby's, "The Three Orders - Feudal Society Imagined":

The Three Orders
 
Last edited:
Oct 2013
13,855
Europix
#10
It was translated to several languages, so probably it will be not hard to find a translation to English, or even to Polish, since I saw that you are from Poland:
Polish wiki doesn't mention George Duby's, "The Three Orders - Feudal Society Imagined" as translated in Polish. If true, it's a pity...
 

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