The top 10 most popularly worshipped Gods of Hindu faith

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,990
New Delhi, India
#92
Below a non Hindu's perception, no offence is meant to any Hindu.

Hard to choose; there are approximately 15 million gods in Hinduism , depending on your perspective. Hinduism also claims there is only one God, Shiva .There are seven gods which represent seven aspects of Shiva. They are:

1. Dreaming force - Indra, 2. Illusory force - Shakti, 3. Voluntary force - Brahma, 4. Semi voluntary force - Vishnu, 5. Involuntary force - Shiva, 6. Status altering force - Shani, 7 Compulsive force-Yama.

Hinduism is everything to all men; it can be simple, complex, or sublime, as in The Bhagavad Gita. Hinduism is theoretically the most inclusive religion ever invented. In practice, not so much, the caste system is alive and well in rural areas, and much evil is still done in the name of caste. Ingrained social norms cannot be ended by passing legislation.

I'm an atheist, but have a special affection for Ganesh, and have several small statues or him spread around my house. I like him because in Hindu mythology, it was Ganesh who wrote down the Mahabharata. I also see him as the patron of scholars.
I am an atheist Hindu. We have so many schemes and I have no problem in accepting your scheme as another. Yes, Hinduism is inclusive. As you yourself say, caste has remained a problem in villages, not so much in the cities. In time the caste differences in villages also will go, times roll on. Ganesha worship is increasing in India, and surely he is a fun God. I appreciate your interest.
ganesha cartoon - Google Search
Arya and non-Aryan is a British colonial theory. The marriage of Satyavati and King Shantanu only signifies that caste system was not even shaped up in ancient India.
Yeah, the 'varna' system of Aryans did not restrict marriage or learning for any 'varna'. The caste system was indigenous, became worse in middle ages.
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,349
USA
#93
As per the legend, Satyavati was a fisherman's daughter with a bad body smell.Sage Parashar promised that he would remove the bad smell if Sayavati cohabited with him and replace it with a heavenly smell. Satyavati complied and Sage VedaVyasa was born out of this union. Later the beauty and body smell of Satyavati attracted Shantanu, the Kuru emperor and he agreed to marry her on her terms (that Shantanu's elser son, later named Bhishma, would not succeed him and her son would be the emperor). After Shantanu's death, the elder son of Satyavati, Chitrangada, become the emperor. Chitrangada, however was killed in a battle and was succeeded by Satyavati's other son, Vichitravirya. The rest is history (or probably myth).

You know all this. Why do you ask?
I know the story. What I'm asking you is "what is in the name Satyavati that is not Arya"? Do you get the question?
 
Jul 2017
510
Sydney
#94
I know the story. What I'm asking you is "what is in the name Satyavati that is not Arya"? Do you get the question?
My guess is this conclusion is based on the profession. The reasoning of this school of thought would be on the lines "An Arya can't be a fisherman".

In my opinion, this logic is flawed
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,990
New Delhi, India
#95
Arya and non-Aryan is a British colonial theory. The marriage of Satyavati and King Shantanu only signifies that caste system was not even shaped up in ancient India.
Yeah, the 'varna' system of Aryans did not restrict marriage or learning for any 'varna'. The caste system was indigenous, became worse in middle ages.
I know the story. What I'm asking you is "what is in the name Satyavati that is not Arya"? Do you get the question?
If a mixed people are re3-telling the story, then they would use the names current in their age, and Sage VedaVyasa certainly was of a mixed parentage.
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,349
USA
#96
Yeah, the 'varna' system of Aryans did not restrict marriage or learning for any 'varna'. The caste system was indigenous, became worse in middle ages.
If a mixed people are re3-telling the story, then they would use the names current in their age, and Sage VedaVyasa certainly was of a mixed parentage.
Do you really not understand what I asked or are you feigning ignorance? We know Veda Vyasa was born to Parashara and Satyavati. What I am asking you is how and why did you determine Satyavati was non-Aryan?
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,349
USA
#97
My guess is this conclusion is based on the profession. The reasoning of this school of thought would be on the lines "An Arya can't be a fisherman".

In my opinion, this logic is flawed
Agreed. We should have had at least some reference that Vyasa's mother had a different name, for us to even think along the lines that Vyasa was Aryan-non-Aryan mix.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,990
New Delhi, India
#98
Do you really not understand what I asked or are you feigning ignorance? We know Veda Vyasa was born to Parashara and Satyavati. What I am asking you is how and why did you determine Satyavati was non-Aryan?
Satyavati is supposed to have been a fisherman's daughter. Migrants, especially those who came in from arid region in Central Asia and Afghanistan who might have been herders and graziers would not take up fishing as means of livelihood. That is why I consider Satyavati to have been indigenous.
 
Jul 2017
510
Sydney
#99
Satyavati is supposed to have been a fisherman's daughter. Migrants, especially those who came in from arid region in Central Asia and Afghanistan who might have been herders and graziers would not take up fishing as means of livelihood. That is why I consider Satyavati to have been indigenous.
How could herders originate in arid regions as you put it?

Cattle need water and grass to flourish. I simply don't agree to this notion that herding was brought into India. It actually went out of here
 
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Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,990
New Delhi, India
Men and animals find water in all sorts of conditions, even in Namibia. Second image from Rajasthan. I know deserts, I was born and brought up there.


 

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