The Troubles in Northern Ireland

Jan 2009
2
Hello, I come from Germany and in school, we are currently working on a project about Ireland. The topic of my group is "The Troubles" (the conflict between Englishmen and Irishmen). We are interested to find out about the relationship of the Englishmen ans Irishmen and we want to know, if there are still any troubles today and why. We prepared a questionnaire and we would be very grateful if you answer the questions! Answering the questionnaire make it easy for us to summarize the different opinions! In addition I will also ask the question in this thread for discussing. Because than we can find out about other views.
First this is the link for the questionnaire:

http://home.pages.at/questionnaire1/index.html

And this is the questions about you can discuss:

Are there any troubles between the Republic Ireland and England today?


If you think so you can discuss about the reason for the troubles
Some possible reason could be:
- because of England took the land of your forefathers.
- because of England tried to force your religion upon your forefathers.
- because of England took your mother tongue.
- or because of the ignorance of the English people during the famine (1845 – 1849).


I would be glad about an active discussion. :)
 

Toltec

Ad Honorem
Apr 2008
7,923
Hyperborea
I think you first problem is that the Irish troubles are not troubles between Englishmen and Irishmen as you put it.

I think you need to go back to the drawing board and (1) study the the Act of Union, (2) next the history of the migrations to Ireland and (3) then consider who the protestants are today not where they came from.
 

Gile na Gile

Ad Honorem
May 2008
4,466
Fireland
http://home.pages.at/questionnaire1/index.html

Some possible reason could be:
- because of England took the land of your forefathers.
- because of England tried to force your religion upon your forefathers.
- because of England took your mother tongue.
- or because of the ignorance of the English people during the famine (1845 – 1849).


Yes, they have been small bones of contention over the years.
 

Nick

Historum Emeritas
Jul 2006
6,111
UK
The Troubles was a conflict between stupid Protestant and stupid Catholic Irish extremist groups (UDA v IRA with Britain caught in the crossfire). The Catholics wanted to join the Irish republic, the Protestants didn't. So the idiots spent 30 years murdering each other instead of trying to negotiate a peaceful solution.
 
Feb 2009
59
Gleasga (Glasgow)
The Troubles are a diverse and difficult issue.

On the one hand you have the mainly Catholic population of Ireland (Eire) who wish to see the whole island independent of Britain. On the other you have the Protestant descendants of the many Scots that moved to Northern Ireland (Ulster) and wish to remain British. However, you also have a great deal of Catholic Irish and the decedents of them in Scotland and there are those with deep set sectarianism in them. The British Army attempted to police the situation and stop terrorist organistaions like the IRA.

Views on the hows and whys vary greatly and it's still a raw wound to many. In my opinion, a great deal of it is based on people fighting over (surprise, surprise) that God fella and how to worship it, Him, Her or whatever. These days, the IRA has disbanded and there is (a shaky at best) power sharing deal with the Northern Irish Assembly. There are many, many sad and horrific moments in the history of Ireland, but to blame the English (I think you mean British by the way) is rather narrow minded.
 
Feb 2009
34
Ireland
Actually I blame the lack of action from our own government for the continuation of a divided Ireland. The Irish government should be constantly lobbying Westminster regarding the issue, but they're not. Nationalists in the North feel abandoned.
 
Feb 2009
254
Glasgow, UK
The roots of the troubles go much deeper than you imply, you really need to study the history of Ireland from the first plantation onwards. I suggest reading some of Robert Kee's work for a good overview, also beware that it is very difficult to find unbiased Irish or British authors on the topic.