the UK Parliament

Jan 2018
23
......
#1
Explain " It is argued that the UK Parliament has lost control over the UK
government; that political power has shifted to a presidential Prime
Minister and unelected bodies and advisers"
Who are those unelected bodies?
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,768
Las Vegas, NV USA
#2
I'd like to read that source. I understand that the Cabinet system does give a great deal of authority to the PM. The backbenchers can raise issues in caucus but the Cabinet formulates the final agenda. However there is no law that I know of that prevents a revolt by backbenchers on the Parliament floor leading to a vote of no confidence for the government. In general the UK PM has more power than the US President.

In Canada, the PM is even stronger. The Office of the Prime Minister has defacto authority independent of the Cabinet in some areas.
 
Jan 2018
23
......
#3
I'd like to read that source. I understand that the Cabinet system does give a great deal of authority to the PM. The backbenchers can raise issues in caucus but the Cabinet formulates the final agenda. However there is no law that I know of that prevents a revolt by backbenchers on the Parliament floor leading to a vote of no confidence for the government. In general the UK PM has more power than the US President.

In Canada, the PM is even stronger. The Office of the Prime Minister has defacto authority independent of the Cabinet in some areas.
Thank you sir for replying.
The source is "The British Civilization:an introduction" by John Oakland.
 

jackydee

Ad Honorem
Jan 2013
4,569
Brigadoon
#4
Explain " It is argued that the UK Parliament has lost control over the UK
government; that political power has shifted to a presidential Prime
Minister and unelected bodies and advisers"
Who are those unelected bodies?
Quango's may be one example you are after. Quango's have been around a long time but their number(or powers) seemed to increase under Tony Blair.

Q&A: What is a quango? - BBC News

I think your quote may be more concerned with political advisors. The exact term is "special advisor". In Government Departments these advisors are taking precedence over civil servants. Google the term "spads".

edit: here's a link: https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/apr/19/spads-special-advisers-took-over-british-politics
 
Jan 2018
23
......
#6
Quango's may be one example you are after. Quango's have been around a long time but their number(or powers) seemed to increase under Tony Blair.

Q&A: What is a quango? - BBC News

I think your quote may be more concerned with political advisors. The exact term is "special advisor". In Government Departments these advisors are taking precedence over civil servants. Google the term "spads".

edit: here's a link: https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/apr/19/spads-special-advisers-took-over-british-politics
Thank you so much :):):)
 

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
15,214
Welsh Marches
#7
There is always a tension with regard to power between the the PM and advisers, the cabinet and ministers, and Parliament; the balance of power is greatly affected by extent of the majority that the governing party has in Parliament. If the majority is small, the government is open to pressure from MPs, and that in turn can be exploited by ministers who disagree with the PM about an issue. If the majority is large, the PM is very powerful; but even then the PM has to face pressures within the governing party. Mrs Thatcher was brought down by such pressures, and Tony Blair had to face constant difficulties from Gordon Brown and his supporters. So it all very variable and immensely complicated. The Blair government affected things by relying so much on special advisers (unelected of course) rather than civil servants (also unelected, but without a personal political agenda on the whole). At times these advisers can be more influential than most cabinet ministers. Very undesirable in my view, as is the way in which governments have devoted increasing attention to manipulation of the media, which was a central feature of Blair's manner of 'governing'.
 

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