The war of American independence was won mainly by the help of Spain,

Jan 2014
44
poio
#11
Spain did not send an army and a fleet.

A relative of mine did research on this, and I agree that Spanish aid had a big effect which has been underplayed. Spain was also gaining territory for itself from the British.
If they didn’t send a large fleet, how could they capture a large British fleet of 63 boats or how they landed in Pensacola. The fleet was well safe Cuba and American ships.
 
Last edited:
Jan 2014
44
poio
#12
Havana was the center of operations for Spain’s aid to the American rebels.
In Havana, American warships were repaired, armed and equipped. From there began the expeditions of aid to the war and there went thousands of British prisoners of war. In Cuba, white and black militias were recruited and trained.

The first recorded moneys were two million livres in hard currency and war materiel. Thus, the United States currency, the Continental, was secured by Spanish silver dollars. Two additional sums were noted: the first, $74,087.00, was loaned to Patriots Oliver Pollock and Thomas Willing and, second, $174,011.00 to John Jay, United States Emissary to Spain. Another source was King Carlos III's August 17, 1780 Royal Order asking Spanish and Indian males in the Americas to donate two dollars and one dollar respectively in equivalent goods, the records of which were sent to Mexico City for distribution -- a mystery of history not quite solved, although rumors abound. Fr. Serra, Father President of Alta California, called this a "war tax." Alta California sent $4,216.00.

the Bourbon Kings of Spain and France each provided one million livres to start the company in May of 1776, six weeks before the Declaration of Independence
The declaration of war by the Family Pact immobilized His Majesty’s fleet and avoided the blockade of the rebel colonies, that coupled with supplies of weapons. According to Juan Bosh, the French Spanish naval squadrons attacked British establishments throughout the Caribbean, forcing the British fleet to clear the Atlantic coast of the colonies.

the Spanish advantage is that the aid was more direct, because most of North America was Spanish, in addition were two rich Spanish territories like New Spain and the province of Cuba, That was a huge advantage in helping the Americans. it`s logical besides the use of the Real a Ocho.
 
Jan 2014
44
poio
#13
215 bronze cannons, 30.000 carabiners and bayonets were supplied, along with bullets, gunpowder, grenades, tents and even uniforms.Spain took charge of supplying everything necessary, including gold, to an incipient and disorganized US army, which lacked the most basic where we included clothing or uniforms.

After equipping the American army, he began as victory in the battle of Saratoga, which encouraged France to support the independence of the colonies, almost more as a personal matter against Britain, the uniforms of the American soldiers in the battle of Saratoga were made with fabrics made in Alcoi and Ontinyent (Valencia).
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,051
#14
You remind me of another Spanish poster here. Maybe what Spain did was more important. However, France's army and fleet were decisive at Yorktown, so that gets more press. Most of what Spain did was covert, sending money and supplies. The fighting in Florida, the west, and at sea mostly didn't have much to do with helping the rebelling colonies.
 
Likes: Rodger

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,398
Portugal
#15
215 bronze cannons, 30.000 carabiners and bayonets were supplied, along with bullets, gunpowder, grenades, tents and even uniforms.Spain took charge of supplying everything necessary, including gold, to an incipient and disorganized US army, which lacked the most basic where we included clothing or uniforms.

After equipping the American army, he began as victory in the battle of Saratoga, which encouraged France to support the independence of the colonies, almost more as a personal matter against Britain, the uniforms of the American soldiers in the battle of Saratoga were made with fabrics made in Alcoi and Ontinyent (Valencia).
I think this is a good moment to show some sources on this. I must say that I was totally unaware of this, not that I know much about this conflict, but I would dare to say that most of the users here are totally ignorant on this, so sources would be essential here.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,847
US
#16
You remind me of another Spanish poster here. Maybe what Spain did was more important. However, France's army and fleet were decisive at Yorktown, so that gets more press. Most of what Spain did was covert, sending money and supplies. The fighting in Florida, the west, and at sea mostly didn't have much to do with helping the rebelling colonies.
While not wanting to undermine Spain's contribution toward the cause, I agree, Florida nor the territory west of the Mississippi were part of the Colonies, so there would have never been any fighting in these areas bewteen the British and the Colonists. Whatever happened there probably did not affect the British efforts or account for the eventual American independence.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,398
Portugal
#17
While not wanting to undermine Spain's contribution toward the cause, I agree, Florida nor the territory west of the Mississippi were part of the Colonies, so there would have never been any fighting in these areas bewteen the British and the Colonists. Whatever happened there probably did not affect the British efforts or account for the eventual American independence.
Any war that affected the United Kingdom at the time would divert British resources, so would affect the evolution of the war. That obviously doesn’t mean that it was a direct contribution.

During the 18th century the UK had been at war with France and Spain in a handful of occasions, so it would be natural that when those two monarchies saw the UK in a swamp like the war in the 13th colonies would try to take advantage of that.
 
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betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,051
#18
During the 18th century the UK had been at war with France and Spain in a handful of occasions, so it would be natural that when those two monarchies saw the UK in a swamp like the war in the 13th colonies would try to take advantage of that.
Yeh, France and Spain saw it as an opportunity to get back at Britain. The Declaration of Independence played down the real issues involved. Westward expansion and political rights would not have been looked favorably on by those monarchies. However, the US was not taken seriously at the time, and France and Spain didn't care that much what the rebellion was about.
 
Likes: Edratman

Edratman

Ad Honorem
Feb 2009
6,586
Eastern PA
#19
The OP by poio inspired me to perform a little research into Bernardo de Gálvez. I was very surprised at what I learned about the magnitude of the Spanish contribution to the revolution and my total ignorance of that contribution. The military accomplishments of Bernardo de Gálvez were quite admirable.

Thank you poio for the enlightenment.
 
Likes: poio
Oct 2016
108
Ashland
#20
The Declaration of Independence played down the real issues involved.
To the English colonists, about to become citizens of an independent state, it rather expressed, fairly eloquently, the 'real issues' for which they were fighting.

Interesting to consider the Spanish role, though the West and Florida were of little actual import strategically. A thought (and research) provoking topic. Odd sidelights of this nature are one of the charms of this Board.
The French aid after Saratoga is more generally acknowledged, seeing as how it led directly to the final victory at Yorktown.
The various Euro states that were engaged in their favorite pastime(making senseless, expensive war each upon the other; in the process wasting irreplaceable natural and human resources) certainly seized every opportunity to weaken the Brits. In the course of this pursuit they also, particularly in the case of France, ended up shooting themselves in the foot and paving the way for their own demise.
Many individuals, such as Kosciusko (sp?) and Lafayette aided the Americans from an apparently genuine belief in the ideals of the American Revolution. For different reasons, others, such as von Steuben, were simply professional soldiers; he was recommended by the French as a military advisor and served admirably in that role during the desperate winter at Valley Forge.
 

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