The weird and whacky world of the Victorians

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,640
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#1
The Victorian age was time of great scientific discovery, as well as perhaps a time of spiritual awakening. Men such as MacGregor Mathers and Michael Faraday were (more or less) contemporaries. The discovery of electricity led to the classical sci-fi work Frankenstein. Howard Carter discovered the tomb of Tutankhaman.

To the Victorians, the world was an amazing place full of mysteries to be discovered while British power was carried to all parts by the sails of the Royal Navy.

This thread is to discuss the whacky world of the Victorians.
 
Likes: Futurist

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,451
Portugal
#2
It was really the century in which the Europeans "discovered" the interior of Africa. Until there Africa was for them mainly a territory of fantasy with the mountains of the moon.
 
Likes: Futurist

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,640
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#3
Photography
Louis Daguerre invented the daguerreotype in the mid 19th century, and it suddenly became possible to make lifelike pictures of people without needing to sit for hours and hours for a portrait. And what did the Victorians do with this wonderful new invention?

Well, one hing they did was "hidden mother photography". These are bizarre images where mothers, in an attempt to keep their children still for the long exposure times, disguised themselves as bits of furniture. They're reallt creepy:

 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,640
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#4
But not as creepy as post-mortem photography.

I shall refrain from 0posting any such pictures, but they can easily be found. If you've watched Nicole Kidman in The Others, you'll know about these. With the mortality rate being so high, children in particular were often the subjects of these pictures. Recently deceased children were dressed up in their Sunday best and often posed eother lying in bed (the little cherub just being asleep) or even worse, posed with other family members. There's one photograph I saw with a deceased boy propped up next to his understandably creeped out little sister for a final family photo (with no parents in sight).

Look them up if you dare!
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#5
Photography
Louis Daguerre invented the daguerreotype in the mid 19th century, and it suddenly became possible to make lifelike pictures of people without needing to sit for hours and hours for a portrait. And what did the Victorians do with this wonderful new invention?

Well, one hing they did was "hidden mother photography". These are bizarre images where mothers, in an attempt to keep their children still for the long exposure times, disguised themselves as bits of furniture. They're reallt creepy:

Why was it necessary to hold children still for long periods of time when photography could be done quickly, though?
 
Oct 2013
6,249
Planet Nine, Oregon
#6
But not as creepy as post-mortem photography.

I shall refrain from 0posting any such pictures, but they can easily be found. If you've watched Nicole Kidman in The Others, you'll know about these. With the mortality rate being so high, children in particular were often the subjects of these pictures. Recently deceased children were dressed up in their Sunday best and often posed eother lying in bed (the little cherub just being asleep) or even worse, posed with other family members. There's one photograph I saw with a deceased boy propped up next to his understandably creeped out little sister for a final family photo (with no parents in sight).

Look them up if you dare!
Those photos of dead children are very creepy; it was the cult of the child --even Crowley predicted the age of the "crowned and conquering child". Some of the photography and art would be seen as near child pornography today. Hair sculptures and other stuff like that they indulged in was pretty spooky too. But it was a weird "gothic age" Victoria dressing in black long after Albert's death.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
26,175
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#7
Well, the Victorian Age has been also the most paranormal period ever in the recent history on this planet.

There was a real passion for spiritualism and overall ghosts. Ghost stories gained an enormous kudos. An aspect of this phenomenon was that they produced photos of ghosts! And without Photoshop!
My personal opinion is that the diffusion of opium among the high classes played a role in this invasion of ghosts ...

Just an article about this: Ghost stories: why the Victorians were so spookily good at them
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,175
Australia
#8
The Victorian age was time of great scientific discovery, as well as perhaps a time of spiritual awakening. Men such as MacGregor Mathers and Michael Faraday were (more or less) contemporaries. The discovery of electricity led to the classical sci-fi work Frankenstein. Howard Carter discovered the tomb of Tutankhaman.

To the Victorians, the world was an amazing place full of mysteries to be discovered while British power was carried to all parts by the sails of the Royal Navy.

This thread is to discuss the whacky world of the Victorians.
Well ! Huff ! I never ... YOU Sir just dont have any taste . I am afraid your idea of wackyness is just a trait of your modern world

No finesse at all . . . . you brutal man , you !


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Now I need to relax .. by slipping into one of my self made costumes

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Freddy mercury ? Elton John ? Never heard of them .


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Henry Cyril Paget, 5th Marquess of Anglesey (1875-1905).
Described as "not as other men" by contemporary reports.

He blew half-a-billion pounds billion on jewelled costumes, pink poodles and a car with perfumed exhaust.

With his flowing peacock robes and jewelled highlights in his long, silky hair, Henry Cyril Paget, the 5th Marquess of Anglesey, adored attention.

Dressed in outlandish clothes, his willowy figure could be spotted walking along fashionable Piccadilly in central London with a snow white, pink-ribboned poodle under his arm.

And he was so rich and self-indulgent that he had his motor cars modified to spout exhaust gases perfumed with patchouli and 'l'eau d'Espagne.'

Most outrageous of all, he loved to perform sinuous, sexy, snake-like dances in front of astonished audiences around Europe, earning him the sobriquet, the Dancing Marquess.

In just a few years, the Dancing Marquess blew the equivalent of almost half a billion pounds on his eccentric lifestyle, acquiring gems by the fistful and a wardrobe of such opulence that it included 260 pairs of kidskin gloves, 200 gold scarf pins and 100 tailored dressing gowns.

Yet he died aged just 30 "pathetically alone", as one obituary put it, leaving debts so high that his family destroyed all record of his life to try to erase the stain on their name.

" There were no known lovers, and Viv Gardner, professor of theatre studies at Manchester University and a researcher behind the new stage production of his life, sees him as "a classic narcissist: the only person he could love and make love to was himself". :D

He owed £544,000 (equivalent to more than a quarter of a billion pounds today). Jewellers headed the list of creditors - £26,651 (£13 million) to Morris Wartski, £21,300 (£10 million) to Dobson's, and so on.

There was booty to repay some of them.

At the castle, trustees appointed by his creditors found treasure chests of pearls, gold cigarette cases studded with rubies and the world's biggest collection of walking sticks, the handles thickly encrusted with amethysts and emeralds.

It all went on sale in what was the auction of the century, lasting 40 days and with 17,000 lots going under the hammer.

Even the Marquess's dogs were sold - his chows, pugs, collies and terriers. "Gentlemen, I am selling at a shilling dogs for which pounds were paid," the auctioneer announced.

One little toy-breed stood shivering as if in dread of a future without a scented lap to lie on while being stroked by soft, jewelled fingers.

And once the dogs had gone, their special silk coats, embroidered in silver with the Paget family crest, went, too.

So did the horses, the cars, the carriages and the yachts.

The Marquess's boots were laid out - leather ones, crocodile-skin, skating boots, suede shoes and silk tapestry slippers - "a complete collection of everything that could be strapped, buckled or laced upon the foot of man", as a local newspaper put it.


Extracts - Eat your heart out Elton, here's the most eccentric English aristocrat ever | Daily Mail Online
The list rolled on.

Thirty of the finest silk pyjamas, 100 dressing gowns, suits of every colour and kind (most unworn), smoking jackets, florid waistcoats, 260 pairs of white kid gloves, 280 sets of socks and 100 overcoats.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,175
Australia
#9
But not as creepy as post-mortem photography.

I shall refrain from 0posting any such pictures, but they can easily be found. If you've watched Nicole Kidman in The Others, you'll know about these. With the mortality rate being so high, children in particular were often the subjects of these pictures. Recently deceased children were dressed up in their Sunday best and often posed eother lying in bed (the little cherub just being asleep) or even worse, posed with other family members. There's one photograph I saw with a deceased boy propped up next to his understandably creeped out little sister for a final family photo (with no parents in sight).

Look them up if you dare!
Thing is, for a period just after pop photography, many people never had a photo of relatives . Then photos became popular / easier, old uncle Fred dies and ... " Oh, we dont have a photo of him , so ..... "


Did they drape the boys arm around the sister for the photo ?

:zany:
 

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