The World Marks 100th Anniversary of the End of WWI

Oct 2018
705
Adelaide south Australia
#61
It’s not really the place for a debate on capital punishment but just regarding this particular point - you would then need three possible verdicts - not guilty, guilty and “guilty and we’re really sure”. I’m not sure how that would work.
Sorry for wandering off topic.
 
Jan 2010
4,031
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#64
It did quite the opposite.
Do you have some stats or argument to try to prove this assertion?

Declining global poverty: share of people living in extreme poverty, 1820-2015

"According to these household surveys, 44% of the world population lived in absolute poverty in 1981. Since then, the share of poor people in the world has declined very fast—in fact, faster than ever before in world history. In 32 years, the share of people living in extreme poverty was divided by 4, reaching levels below 11% in 2013. Although the World Bank estimates for 2015 are not yet available, the projections suggest that the incidence of extreme poverty has fallen below 10% for that year." From Global Extreme Poverty . (emphasis added)
 

Valens

Ad Honorem
Feb 2014
8,249
Colonia Valensiana
#65
Do you have some stats or argument to try to prove this assertion?

Declining global poverty: share of people living in extreme poverty, 1820-2015

"According to these household surveys, 44% of the world population lived in absolute poverty in 1981. Since then, the share of poor people in the world has declined very fast—in fact, faster than ever before in world history. In 32 years, the share of people living in extreme poverty was divided by 4, reaching levels below 11% in 2013. Although the World Bank estimates for 2015 are not yet available, the projections suggest that the incidence of extreme poverty has fallen below 10% for that year." From Global Extreme Poverty . (emphasis added)
I don't need to prove it. You've made the assertion that neoliberalism lifted billions out of poverty. The link you provided merely shows a decline in poverty, not that neoliberalism was the reason for it. Nevertheless, the negative impact of neoliberal policies has been extensively documented and proven. We may as well treat it as a fact.

In the larger context of globalisation, poverty and underdevelopment are not the only outcomes of the failure of certain national policies. They are also linked to disparities of exchange in international trade, unilateralism of economic policy in a neoliberal global order, and the increasing vulnerability of farmers and workers of the developing countries to incessant cycles of slump.

Trade imbalances, increasing economic deficits and the exclusion of the Global South from the policymaking in the international economic system has created economic uncertainty and political unrest in the developing world. Over the last two decades, there is a marked increase in comparative poverty within nation-states despite the remarkable rise in the volumes of GDP of many developing countries.

In countries like India and Brazil, there are increased economic disparities between the rich and poor, with plummeting economic returns for the poor in the world of the free market. The political implications of neoliberal economic policies are visible in India, with the rise of centrifugal political movements. During the last decade, India has seen the rise of Maoist movements, farmers’ agitations, communal riots, Muslim separatist movements and the rise of Hindutva as a counter-narrative to these movements of separatism. The neoliberal pledges of economic integration to create a secular democratic and politically stable India have faded away in favour of a fascist and coercive regime.


Neoliberalism and poverty
 
Jan 2010
4,031
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#66
I don't need to prove it. You've made the assertion that neoliberalism lifted billions out of poverty. The link you provided merely shows a decline in poverty, not that neoliberalism was the reason for it. Nevertheless, the negative impact of neoliberal policies has been extensively documented and proven. We may as well treat it as a fact.

In the larger context of globalisation, poverty and underdevelopment are not the only outcomes of the failure of certain national policies. They are also linked to disparities of exchange in international trade, unilateralism of economic policy in a neoliberal global order, and the increasing vulnerability of farmers and workers of the developing countries to incessant cycles of slump.

Trade imbalances, increasing economic deficits and the exclusion of the Global South from the policymaking in the international economic system has created economic uncertainty and political unrest in the developing world. Over the last two decades, there is a marked increase in comparative poverty within nation-states despite the remarkable rise in the volumes of GDP of many developing countries.

In countries like India and Brazil, there are increased economic disparities between the rich and poor, with plummeting economic returns for the poor in the world of the free market. The political implications of neoliberal economic policies are visible in India, with the rise of centrifugal political movements. During the last decade, India has seen the rise of Maoist movements, farmers’ agitations, communal riots, Muslim separatist movements and the rise of Hindutva as a counter-narrative to these movements of separatism. The neoliberal pledges of economic integration to create a secular democratic and politically stable India have faded away in favour of a fascist and coercive regime.

Neoliberalism and poverty
Please show me a source other than the opinion of a newpaper column.

Although correlation is not causation, the pursuit of neoliberal policies is correlated to the amazing decline in poverty. If those policies--I would call them pursuit of market economies--did not cause the decline, then what did?
 

Valens

Ad Honorem
Feb 2014
8,249
Colonia Valensiana
#67
However, you fail to support the claim neoliberal policies resulted in the reduction of poverty. Global reduction of poverty cannot be attributed to one economic policy (such as neoliberalism) as it was a rather a result of many countries pursuing different models of development, often in regard to their institutional, social, political and cultural environment. China has achieved the most dramatic poverty reduction in our time, while its economic policy can hardly be considered neoliberal.
On the other hand, countries, where neoliberal policies were applied zealously, have seen a significant rise in income inequality, poverty, unemployment. Examples of this are Greece, Russia in the 90's. In any case, we might have different views of what neoliberal policies actually are. My criticism of neoliberalism proceeds from my understanding of its effects on our world today. Whether we call it 'neoliberalism' or use a different term does not deny the fact that these policies have had a negative impact on the economic and social development of many countries.
 
Oct 2013
12,758
Europix
#68
I have. Tho not based on hard figures.

Actually, living with more than 1.9 $/day is mostly irrelevant. It is more relevant what You can do with 1.9 $/day, and it's fundamental what one expects from life: that I don't see any longer my kids literally dying of malnutrition but I can somehow feed them it's not exactly an achievement.

1. These days, the manager of the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi was arrested for false declaration of his revenues=fiscal fraud. He earned something like 20 mil $ (salary + the rest) in 2017.

2. 1% of the world population own 50% of the world's total wealth. [*]


What counts is the poverty perception and the sentiment of "social injustice". And ex1 + ex 2 is enforcing that perception and that sentiment.

_____
[*] source: Global Wealth Report 2017: Where Are We Ten Years after the Crisis?
 
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Likes: Valens
Jan 2010
4,031
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#70
I don't need to prove it. You've made the assertion that neoliberalism lifted billions out of poverty. The link you provided merely shows a decline in poverty, not that neoliberalism was the reason for it. Nevertheless, the negative impact of neoliberal policies has been extensively documented and proven. We may as well treat it as a fact.
You concede my point that poverty has generally declined lately--a lot. But you continue to insist that neoliberalism, which is at least one of the economic policies pursued, causes poverty. Since you say that extensive documentation and proof for that proposition exists, produce it.