There are some things I don't understand about the development of Chinese polearms: halberds/dagger-axes

Jun 2012
522
Speaking of the Donghai arsenal inventory why were there 500 dagger -axes made of bronze there? were they for ceremonial purposes or just some left over antiques from the warring states? I mean by then the dagger-axe should have been replaced by the Ji at that time
The ceremonial/command purposes would be my guess but Hackneyed should know more definitely.
 
Jun 2012
522
That horizontal protrusion is easy to break. Other designs are far more durable and serve a similar function.
It does not appear that the horizontal protrusion would be far less durable, though.
Here is a demonstration below (skip to 2:11 for some hook-on-metal action).
Sure, there might be differences in material, but a lot of the horizontal protrusions on popular European polearms were far thinner yet more aggressively angled than those of the 'Ji' polearms.
1573714166220.png
 
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Jan 2016
611
United States, MO
Speaking of the Donghai arsenal inventory why were there 500 dagger -axes made of bronze there? were they for ceremonial purposes or just some left over antiques from the warring states? I mean by then the dagger-axe should have been replaced by the Ji at that time
I would guess that they were leftovers. It would be a fallacy to assume that all the weapons in the stockpile were meant to be used. Militaries in general don’t throw things away unless they have a specific reason to do so.
 
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