Things that you dislike about your country

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,664
SoCal
#1
What are some things that you dislike about your country?

As for me:

Adopted country (USA):

1. Its historical treatment of Native Americans. I understand the need for living space but this could've been handled in a more humane manner--as in, no Trail of Tears, et cetera.
2. The historical presence of slavery in various parts of the US and especially in the Southern US.
3. The bad treatment that free Black people received in various parts of the US but especially in the Southern US (Jim Crow laws) until the 1960s.
4. The US's war against the Filipinos at the end of the 19th century and in the early 20th century. The Filipinos wanted independence and the US should have given it to them immediately.
5. The US's support of brutal dictators and also support of regime change during the Cold War and, in some cases, after the end of the Cold War (though post-Cold War US-sponsored regime change has been better than Cold War US-sponsored regime change).

Birth country (Israel):

1. Its lack of civil marriage.
2. Its Jewish chauvinism (including the extreme difficulty of having non-Jews move to Israel).
3. Its treatment of the Palestinians. Note: IMHO, it would have been better for Israel to conquer all of the West Bank in 1948-1949. In such a scenario, there might not have been a Palestinian issue in Israel since a lot of the Palestinians in the West Bank might have fled to Jordan.
4. Its overpopulation/overcrowdedness.
5. Its forced military service (the draft--which emigrants such as myself thankfully don't have to worry about).

Anyway, what are some things that you dislike about your own country or countries?
 
Sep 2017
637
United States
#2
1. Over-reliance on factory farming
2. Overruse of fossil fuels
3. Recent political polarization and governmental stagnation
4. Dominance of corporations

Can't really complain though. The only place I'd rather live more than the U.S. would be a nation of my own rule, and that wouldn't be great for anyone except for me.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,664
SoCal
#3
1. Over-reliance on factory farming
2. Overruse of fossil fuels
3. Recent political polarization and governmental stagnation
4. Dominance of corporations

Can't really complain though. The only place I'd rather live more than the U.S. would be a nation of my own rule, and that wouldn't be great for anyone except for me.
I agree with all four of your items here.
 

Menshevik

Ad Honorem
Dec 2012
8,970
here
#7
Birth country (Israel):

1. Its lack of civil marriage.
2. Its Jewish chauvinism (including the extreme difficulty of having non-Jews move to Israel).
3. Its treatment of the Palestinians. Note: IMHO, it would have been better for Israel to conquer all of the West Bank in 1948-1949. In such a scenario, there might not have been a Palestinian issue in Israel since a lot of the Palestinians in the West Bank might have fled to Jordan.
4. Its overpopulation/overcrowdedness.
5. Its forced military service (the draft--which emigrants such as myself thankfully don't have to worry about).
I read a book a while ago that said that Israel's universal military service was actually a boon, rather than a disadvantage. It was said that in countries like the U.S., PTSD is more of a problem due to the fact that only a small minority of the population can relate to returning veterans who are trying to become reacquainted with civilian life. Contrasted with Israeli society where almost everyone has served and and knows -- to a certain degree -- what the soldier is going through.

I liked the way this article summed it up:

"The IDF is a citizens’ army, consisting of our fathers, brothers, husbands, friends, sisters and daughters. Almost every household has a soldier, if not a number of soldiers, many of whom have fought in multiple wars. Those who don’t have a soldier in their own family live next to a household with a soldier. Virtually every person does reserve duty and/or has colleagues who take leave from work to go to reserve duty.
Israelis pass soldiers on the bus, in the train and in the store. Even those portions of society that do not enlist (such as Orthodox Jews) have seen soldiers and had interactions with soldiers. This means that many Israelis who have not themselves been on a battlefield have secondary experience with those that have; they have dealt with injuries and death of friends and family, brothers and sisters."



"To Israelis, soldiers aren’t heroic figures you throw parades for and give medals. Soldiers are our boys, our girls, our family. You feed them, make sure they are warm and comfortable. You let them sleep on your shoulder if they fall asleep next to you on the bus. It doesn’t matter if you never saw them before and don’t know their name. It doesn’t matter if they come from a different background than you or have a personality you don’t like. The minute they put on the uniform, they belong to you and you belong to them.

Each soldier could be anyone’s soldier, so you do for someone else’s son or daughter exactly what you would hope someone would do for yours. Our heroes are soldiers that go home, and their mother tells them to take out the trash. No one calls them “Sir.” Rarely, will anyone thank them for their service, but everyone will love them."

Why do Israeli soldiers suffer from PTSD less than American counterparts?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,664
SoCal
#8
I read a book a while ago that said that Israel's universal military service was actually a boon, rather than a disadvantage. It was said that in countries like the U.S., PTSD is more of a problem due to the fact that only a small minority of the population can relate to returning veterans who are trying to become reacquainted with civilian life. Contrasted with Israeli society where almost everyone has served and and knows -- to a certain degree -- what the soldier is going through.

I liked the way this article summed it up:

"The IDF is a citizens’ army, consisting of our fathers, brothers, husbands, friends, sisters and daughters. Almost every household has a soldier, if not a number of soldiers, many of whom have fought in multiple wars. Those who don’t have a soldier in their own family live next to a household with a soldier. Virtually every person does reserve duty and/or has colleagues who take leave from work to go to reserve duty.
Israelis pass soldiers on the bus, in the train and in the store. Even those portions of society that do not enlist (such as Orthodox Jews) have seen soldiers and had interactions with soldiers. This means that many Israelis who have not themselves been on a battlefield have secondary experience with those that have; they have dealt with injuries and death of friends and family, brothers and sisters."



"To Israelis, soldiers aren’t heroic figures you throw parades for and give medals. Soldiers are our boys, our girls, our family. You feed them, make sure they are warm and comfortable. You let them sleep on your shoulder if they fall asleep next to you on the bus. It doesn’t matter if you never saw them before and don’t know their name. It doesn’t matter if they come from a different background than you or have a personality you don’t like. The minute they put on the uniform, they belong to you and you belong to them.

Each soldier could be anyone’s soldier, so you do for someone else’s son or daughter exactly what you would hope someone would do for yours. Our heroes are soldiers that go home, and their mother tells them to take out the trash. No one calls them “Sir.” Rarely, will anyone thank them for their service, but everyone will love them."

Why do Israeli soldiers suffer from PTSD less than American counterparts?
Well, I don't have the appetite to risk my life for Israel. I'd agree to do this for the US if I was forced to (as in, if I was drafted)--but not for Israel unless it was a US military intervention to help Israel out and Americans were being drafted into the US military.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,664
SoCal
#10
Why is it that bad thing ? Israel is surrounded by enemies. Well, at least they believe in that.
Not everyone wants to risk their life for every country. I and my family are the types of ex-Soviet Jews who would have preferred to come to the US at the very beginning like some other ex-Soviet Jews did. Unfortunately, my parents didn't have an opportunity to come to the US in 1991 and had to wait almost a decade (until early 2001) before we could actually move to the U.S.