Things that you dislike about your country

Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
The US health system tends to bemuse Aussies.

We have a universal health system, availably to all citizens (not sure about resident aliens) This is funded by an extra 2.5% tax levy on taxable income.

Our System is called 'Medicare' .Everyone is entitled to free care at a public hospital including say organ transplants or long and costly treatment for cancer. GP services may also be free if the doctor 'bulk bills' .IE doe snot add charges above his government rebate .My GP bulk bills.

Our pharmaceutical system is heavily subsidised , with a list of thousands of drugs . There is a cap of $30 per script on listed drugs. Pensioners pay a maximum of $6.50 per script.

The system is not perfect, with waits as long as a couple of years for 'elective surgery" (non life threatening) such as say cataract removal or knee/hip replacement.

We have an ageing population, which places a high demand on our public hospitals. . The government has addressed this issue by offering a 30% subsidy on private health premiums, if taken up before the age of 50.

A private health company MAY NOT refuse to insure a person for pre existing ailments, although a 2 year waiting period may be imposed. There is also usually a 2 month waiting period for new members.Of course, your Medicare coverage continues.

Once you are covered, the private health fund MUST continue to cover you for as long as needed.IE your private health insurance cannot 'run out'.

I had a cataracts removed two years ago. The total cost was $1500. I paid $0.00

How is this possible? Simple really, it is the government, not the health funds who make the rules.

My (single) health health insurance, plus some 'extras',such as for glasses, hearing aids,,physiotherapy, etc, is $179 a month after the subsidy. An unlimited number of children under 17 years are covered by their parents health insurance.

Yeah, I know, this 'socialised medicine" similar to that in the UK and Canada. I know many Americans would prefer to die rather than have socialised medicine, and indeed a great many do.
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,603
Australia
The US health system tends to bemuse Aussies.

We have a universal health system, availably to all citizens (not sure about resident aliens) This is funded by an extra 2.5% tax levy on taxable income.

Our System is called 'Medicare' .Everyone is entitled to free care at a public hospital including say organ transplants or long and costly treatment for cancer. GP services may also be free if the doctor 'bulk bills' .IE doe snot add charges above his government rebate .My GP bulk bills.

Our pharmaceutical system is heavily subsidised , with a list of thousands of drugs . There is a cap of $30 per script on listed drugs. Pensioners pay a maximum of $6.50 per script.

The system is not perfect, with waits as long as a couple of years for 'elective surgery" (non life threatening) such as say cataract removal or knee/hip replacement.

We have an ageing population, which places a high demand on our public hospitals. . The government has addressed this issue by offering a 30% subsidy on private health premiums, if taken up before the age of 50.

A private health company MAY NOT refuse to insure a person for pre existing ailments, although a 2 year waiting period may be imposed. There is also usually a 2 month waiting period for new members.Of course, your Medicare coverage continues.

Once you are covered, the private health fund MUST continue to cover you for as long as needed.IE your private health insurance cannot 'run out'.

I had a cataracts removed two years ago. The total cost was $1500. I paid $0.00

How is this possible? Simple really, it is the government, not the health funds who make the rules.

My (single) health health insurance, plus some 'extras',such as for glasses, hearing aids,,physiotherapy, etc, is $179 a month after the subsidy. An unlimited number of children under 17 years are covered by their parents health insurance.

Yeah, I know, this 'socialised medicine" similar to that in the UK and Canada. I know many Americans would prefer to die rather than have socialised medicine, and indeed a great many do.

While there are certainly problems and Medicare needs some reforms it is by far a better system than can be found almost anywhere else. My son has just returned home after several years residence in Britain. He has stories about the NHS that make Medicare look a model of efficiency.
 
Apr 2018
690
Upland, Sweden
While there are certainly problems and Medicare needs some reforms it is by far a better system than can be found almost anywhere else. My son has just returned home after several years residence in Britain. He has stories about the NHS that make Medicare look a model of efficiency.
I don't know about the NHS, but we have a similar system to the NHS here in Sweden (although since two decades there is no longer a state monopoly on health care, and private actors are allowed). Our problem is that we have a government sponsored policy of "equal right to treatment", which means that the ability of doctors and hospitals to prioritize between different kinds of diseases becomes circumscribed. We sometimes have absurd waiting lists, but in the big cities the system worked reasonably well until 2015 (also related to the problem I mentioned in my post of "things I dislike about my country"). All that being said, I am not really convinced that your system is "far better than can be found almost anywhere else" - see the graph down below. The Netherlands have a very good and efficient system from what I hear, without having 45% tax rates like we do...

A "positive" aspect of the American system is that you guys essentially invest in R&D for the rest of the Western world. Your cost overheads - you spend almost twice as much as a percentage of GDP on healthcare as we do, despite the fact that much of your underclass seems to be uninsured and many who have insurance seem not to be guaranteed treatment beyond a certain point - is that much of it seems to go to research and development. Perhaps your system is necessary, and we are really parasites pretending to be more morally enlightened? I am not convinced in this particlar regard, but I think Joel Mokyr published a paper making such a case, to quite good effect.

1549189873365.png
 

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,939
San Antonio, Tx
The US health system tends to bemuse Aussies.

We have a universal health system, availably to all citizens (not sure about resident aliens) This is funded by an extra 2.5% tax levy on taxable income.

Our System is called 'Medicare' .Everyone is entitled to free care at a public hospital including say organ transplants or long and costly treatment for cancer. GP services may also be free if the doctor 'bulk bills' .IE doe snot add charges above his government rebate .My GP bulk bills.

Our pharmaceutical system is heavily subsidised , with a list of thousands of drugs . There is a cap of $30 per script on listed drugs. Pensioners pay a maximum of $6.50 per script.

The system is not perfect, with waits as long as a couple of years for 'elective surgery" (non life threatening) such as say cataract removal or knee/hip replacement.

We have an ageing population, which places a high demand on our public hospitals. . The government has addressed this issue by offering a 30% subsidy on private health premiums, if taken up before the age of 50.

A private health company MAY NOT refuse to insure a person for pre existing ailments, although a 2 year waiting period may be imposed. There is also usually a 2 month waiting period for new members.Of course, your Medicare coverage continues.

Once you are covered, the private health fund MUST continue to cover you for as long as needed.IE your private health insurance cannot 'run out'.

I had a cataracts removed two years ago. The total cost was $1500. I paid $0.00

How is this possible? Simple really, it is the government, not the health funds who make the rules.

My (single) health health insurance, plus some 'extras',such as for glasses, hearing aids,,physiotherapy, etc, is $179 a month after the subsidy. An unlimited number of children under 17 years are covered by their parents health insurance.

Yeah, I know, this 'socialised medicine" similar to that in the UK and Canada. I know many Americans would prefer to die rather than have socialised medicine, and indeed a great many do.
Frankly, I think most Americans would love “socialized” medicine. The insurance company BS (horse pucky) has been wearing very thin for a long time. The revolt against these companies which treat Americans like so many aphids to be stroked for sugar water s coming.
 

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,939
San Antonio, Tx
Marijuana issues cause inconvenience for Canadian travellers.

That has not yet been established, but I think you're probably right, given American paranoia about drugs, and the not uncommon officiousness of US officials. Every member of my family has experienced some complete dickheads of US officials,These paragons of efficiency and reason all seemed to be convinced that we were all just dying to live in the US, so would remain after visas expired.

For the record: we all have dual citizenship with Canada, we all love the US, and have a lot of relatives there. However, none of us would live in the US on a bet, especially with that thug in the Whitehouse...
Who knows, but I believe the thug’s days in the WH are numbered.
 

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,939
San Antonio, Tx
I found it bad enough in the U.K. when it was in the low to mid 30s in the summer.
When we first moved back to Houston in 1956 (from Canada) our house had several “window units” for air conditioning. These units had a very difficult time keeping up with the heat and humidity there. At the time, the British consulate classified Houston as a “hardship” post because of the heat and humidity. I cannot even begin to imagine how awful it must have been before air conditioning.

A few years later, we installed a central air conditioning syste and the heat was no longer a problem inside, but of course, outside it was broiling. Central air conditioning turned Houston from a city of about 400,000 people to a city of more than 6 million in the metro area. Take away air conditioning, massive population flight would occur.
 

rvsakhadeo

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
8,899
India
There are any number of things that I dislike in my country. i) A highly corrupt, careless and rogue set of politicians from all parties. This set destroys the confidence of the citizens in the governance of our country, gladdens the hearts of our external enemies and internal crooks and traitors. ii ) The overriding sense of 'why bother 'among the educated middle classes whose main aim seems to be to join the corruption bandwagon and make as much money as possible without equivalent honest effort. iii ) A low respect for developing a scientific mindset. Very surprisingly even the educated people do not bother to read about scientific developements and are interested more in engaging in futile political squabbles among friends.iv ) while personal cleanliness is somewhat good, not so the cleanliness in the public.
 
Likes: royal744

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,814
Australia
The US health system tends to bemuse Aussies.

We have a universal health system, availably to all citizens (not sure about resident aliens) This is funded by an extra 2.5% tax levy on taxable income.

Our System is called 'Medicare' .Everyone is entitled to free care at a public hospital including say organ transplants or long and costly treatment for cancer. GP services may also be free if the doctor 'bulk bills' .IE doe snot add charges above his government rebate .My GP bulk bills.

Our pharmaceutical system is heavily subsidised , with a list of thousands of drugs . There is a cap of $30 per script on listed drugs. Pensioners pay a maximum of $6.50 per script.

The system is not perfect, with waits as long as a couple of years for 'elective surgery" (non life threatening) such as say cataract removal or knee/hip replacement.

We have an ageing population, which places a high demand on our public hospitals. . The government has addressed this issue by offering a 30% subsidy on private health premiums, if taken up before the age of 50.

A private health company MAY NOT refuse to insure a person for pre existing ailments, although a 2 year waiting period may be imposed. There is also usually a 2 month waiting period for new members.Of course, your Medicare coverage continues.

Once you are covered, the private health fund MUST continue to cover you for as long as needed.IE your private health insurance cannot 'run out'.

I had a cataracts removed two years ago. The total cost was $1500. I paid $0.00

How is this possible? Simple really, it is the government, not the health funds who make the rules.

My (single) health health insurance, plus some 'extras',such as for glasses, hearing aids,,physiotherapy, etc, is $179 a month after the subsidy. An unlimited number of children under 17 years are covered by their parents health insurance.

Yeah, I know, this 'socialised medicine" similar to that in the UK and Canada. I know many Americans would prefer to die rather than have socialised medicine, and indeed a great many do.
Yep, two years back I was seeing my doctor ( for free) he booked me into a specialist (paid those fees but got refunded ), who said I needed a hip replacement ; the prosthesis, the surgery, the hospital stay, the meals, the drugs, the physiotherapy, the after care ......

cost $00.00 .

I think its amazing .

But the problem here seems to be with private medical insurance . I think it goes something like like this :

Since the government was paying for my op .... lets say the government agrees to pay surgeons fee - $5000 - so the surgeon agrees he will do it for $5000.

But if it is private insurance , apparently the fee can be whatever the surgeon decides - $6000, if he wants - then your insurance pays the $5000 and you have to pay the $1000 excess . There doesnt seem to be any regulatory body that limits fees . . . . for NON public medicare patients
 
Feb 2015
111
south Slavic guy
Yep, two years back I was seeing my doctor ( for free) he booked me into a specialist (paid those fees but got refunded ), who said I needed a hip replacement ; the prosthesis, the surgery, the hospital stay, the meals, the drugs, the physiotherapy, the after care ......

cost $00.00 .

I think its amazing .

But the problem here seems to be with private medical insurance . I think it goes something like like this :

Since the government was paying for my op .... lets say the government agrees to pay surgeons fee - $5000 - so the surgeon agrees he will do it for $5000.

But if it is private insurance , apparently the fee can be whatever the surgeon decides - $6000, if he wants - then your insurance pays the $5000 and you have to pay the $1000 excess . There doesnt seem to be any regulatory body that limits fees . . . . for NON public medicare patients

If some doctor offers to cure you for 6000$, there are other doctors who can offer you a price of 4500$, so you decide to whom you go.