This is kind of a career question for me..

Nov 2010
4,253
3rd rock from Sol
#1
Putting it briefly....

Currently I am at college studying Science.... but am really interested in history (not the statistical history, like dates, names etc, I like studying the culture, literature, armies, life of people in history)....

But, if I study history, will I be able to make a career out of it? I mean, now, only nerds who studied pure sciences and applied science get the jobs or the heady lawyers and businessmen make a good life. But what are the kinda opportunities I may get if I study history?

Am good at science but recently lost all interest in Science and started going full time after history (Historum's an example), I realized this will be a big problem in the future if I dont take the right decisions now...

So please help me... :sad::sad::crying:
 
Aug 2010
16,202
Welsh Marches
#4
I would say: take great care here. Many people develop a great interest in history, literature or whatever and keep it up throughout their lives, and gain much enrichment from it, while happily following a career as a doctor, banker or something equally practical. The worst thing is to be drawn in two directions, and be following one track, as you are doing, and then be distracted by other interests. You really do need to make a definite decision, either to pay proper attention towhat you are doing, or to change over to another track. To know whether it would be a god idea to change over, perhaps to take a history degree eventually, you need to examone what the prospects are for people who have such degrees in your own country. As it happens, two of my brothers took history degrees in the UK and went on to have successful careers in commerce. The prospects for directly using historical qualifications are of course limited, unless you become a university lecturer, teacher or writer. So if you were to study history and then very possibly go on to a career in another area, it is worth considering whether it might not be better just to continue on your present course and maintain your historical studies as a private interest, especially if scientific studies are most helpful in gaining good jobs in your country (as you seem to suggest).
 
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Nov 2010
4,253
3rd rock from Sol
#5
I would say: take great care here. Many people develop a great interest in history, literature or whatever and keep it up throughout their lives, and gain much enrichment from it, while happily following a career as a doctor, banker or something equally practical. The worst thing is to be drawn in two directions, and be following one track, as you are doing, and then be distracted by other interests. You really do need to make a definite decision, either to pay proper attention towhat you are doing, or to change over to another track. To know whether it would be a god idea to change over, perhaps to take a history degree eventually, you need to examone what the prospects are for people who have such degrees in your own country. As it happens, two of my brothers took history degrees in the UK and went on to have successful careers in commerce. The prospects for directly using historical qualifications are of course limited, unless you become a university lecturer, teacher or writer. So if you were to study history and then very possibly go on to a career in another area, it is worth considering whether it might not be better just to continue on your present course and maintain your historical studies as a private interest, especially if scientific studies are most helpful in gaining good jobs in your country (as you seem to suggest).
Thanks Linschoten:) Yes I think it would be better to continue at science and keep history as a private interest,

Also, I would like to know about the opportunities for a history graduate, not only India, but in other countries also, how about the UK?:)
 
Aug 2010
16,202
Welsh Marches
#6
In the UK a history degree from a good university is by no means unhelpful when seeking jobs afterwards; it is not one of those degrees that are regarded as being an easy option; but is helpful to be able to point at the same time to having broader knowledge and interests (for instance to have studied an area of history that requires knowledge of other languages). More members of my family have studied history at university than any other subject, and I would not discourage anyone here from taking it up. But there are also more directly vocational routes to finding a good job that are worth quite as much consideration, and I haven't observed that people who follow such a route generally end up as being less cultivated people than those who study subjects with more cultural content; the decisive issue is whether people have a personal interest in history (or literature or whatever), irrespective of whether they study it as an academic subject. If you are practical when young, and qualify yourself for a good career, even if the subject matter may be dull, you will be able to afford to be able to indulge yourself later! So it may not be such a great sacrifice to continue on studies that you now find rather tedious.
 
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Edratman

Forum Staff
Feb 2009
6,649
Eastern PA
#9
There is also a Universal saying- "Money cant buy happiness"
That doesn't make any sense. :amuse:

Anyway, what you mean is, I should go after the trend of the market and choose a practical career? Like in science?
That is not quite what I intended.

There are countless forces in any persons life, all applying pressures from a host of directions. Few of these forces are black/white or yes/no.

Five years from now you will find out that many of the questions that you thought were yes/no, black/white are blurred into gray.

This is your life and I have no right to offer you advice, but I can still dispense wisdom.

You are at a nexus of your life. Whatever path you choose do not look back and say "If I only had....". The hindsight view NEVER incorporates the pitfalls and problems that were not envisioned yet are inevitable.

Almost every decision that looks good or bad at this moment may improve or detiorate in a decade or two. Live with it because that is beyond your control.

If you choose a path now that has few tangible rewards now and stays that way 40 years from now it will look like a very stupid decision.

If you choose a path now that has immediate rewards that evaporates in a decade, you can chalk that up to bad luck.

Then there is the materialistic thing. Maybe you can be very, very happy doing something you enjoy with few material rewards. Maybe your future family can be equally happy also?

Here is the bottom line; either be very lucky in your choice or be very adaptable. I'd advise Plan B!

Personally, I have an engineering degree that was/is (?) very steel mill oriented. The steel industry in the US evaporated a decade into my life after college. POOF! POOF! POOF!

I adapted and managed to survive past that.
 
Sep 2010
9,988
Bahrain
#10
I'm also in the same dilemma , I plan to study Medicine ( and hopefully become a Doc ) but I do also like history. I'd say its best to keep it as a hobby rather than a profession. I've heard of possibilities of attending part-time courses for history (maybe that would be of interest).
Or you could just buy loads of history books and brag :p

Take option 2 !! :D
 

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