This year is 500th anniversary of the departure of the first known circumnavigation of the world!

Oct 2017
243
America ??
Just searching the words “magellan anniversary” on google will reveal lots of articles on this. This is also same year as Hernán Cortés’ arrival in Mexico, whose campaign coincidentally lasted the same years as Magellan’s expedition. Lots of anniversaries within proximity these years.
Among other things really shows how lots was going on in the middle of the millennium, the epochal shift to modern times, & how far we’re moving into the new millennium, 20 years now, but it feels so long since the turn of the millennium now & how so much has changed.

This was the first definitive proof that the earth was round, though of course it had always remained an abstraction until the development of space technology to show how it actually looks.

With five ships departing with 239 to 270 men (is it known if there were any female crew?), & only one ship returning with 18 men three years later, I think that suggests among other things that the voyage must have been nightmarish among other aspects, perhaps inspiring enough for thriller or horror stories wouldn’t it?
 
Mar 2019
1,801
Kansas
With five ships departing with 239 to 270 men (is it known if there were any female crew?), & only one ship returning with 18 men three years later, I think that suggests among other things that the voyage must have been nightmarish among other aspects, perhaps inspiring enough for thriller or horror stories wouldn’t it?
The worst part of the journey was crossing the Pacific. They lost 30 men to scurvy. One ship mutinied and simply returned home. Another ship was lost but all the crew survived.

They lost a further 50 crew during the battle that Magellan was killed in.

After that battle, about 20 or so were poisoned at a dinner given for them by one of the local leaders.
 
Aug 2018
274
America
Spain and Portugal still wanting to remember their days as brutal colonial empires.

People will obviously not remember the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Mactan (at least not outside of the Philippines), where Magellan was killed and which stopped Spanish colonialism in Asia for half a century.
 
Oct 2018
1,500
Sydney
Just searching the words “magellan anniversary” on google will reveal lots of articles on this. This is also same year as Hernán Cortés’ arrival in Mexico, whose campaign coincidentally lasted the same years as Magellan’s expedition. Lots of anniversaries within proximity these years.
Among other things really shows how lots was going on in the middle of the millennium, the epochal shift to modern times, & how far we’re moving into the new millennium, 20 years now, but it feels so long since the turn of the millennium now & how so much has changed.

This was the first definitive proof that the earth was round, though of course it had always remained an abstraction until the development of space technology to show how it actually looks.

With five ships departing with 239 to 270 men (is it known if there were any female crew?), & only one ship returning with 18 men three years later, I think that suggests among other things that the voyage must have been nightmarish among other aspects, perhaps inspiring enough for thriller or horror stories wouldn’t it?
It was an incredible achievement. Shame Magellan never got to see it through to completion.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,950
Sydney
nearing the end of the journey , the lone ship had to jettison some of its cargo to escape pursuing Portuguese ships who were looking for them
selling the remain of the cargo of spices is supposed to have covered all the cost of the expedition
 
Oct 2017
243
America ??
nearing the end of the journey , the lone ship had to jettison some of its cargo to escape pursuing Portuguese ships who were looking for them
selling the remain of the cargo of spices is supposed to have covered all the cost of the expedition
Why were Portuguese ships pursing them?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,877
Portugal
Spain and Portugal still wanting to remember their days as brutal colonial empires.

People will obviously not remember the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Mactan (at least not outside of the Philippines), where Magellan was killed and which stopped Spanish colonialism in Asia for half a century.
That is not correct, Escritor (by the way it is somehow related with your signature). What “stopped” Spanish colonialism in Asia for half a century (even if I think the word “stooped” is incorrect here, “delayed” would be more correct), was the Treaty of Tordesilhas, and the fact that the Castilians didn’t knew how to make the return to America. When that was finally full field their colonialism in Asia developed naturally.

Why were Portuguese ships pursing them?
Because due the Treaty of Tordesilhas they were in forbidden waters. They couldn’t sail in the Indian Ocean. They sailed because there were Portuguese in the crew with experience in those waters, otherwise they wouldn’t have achieved it. Some of the crew was arrested by the Portuguese. Let us recall that Magalhães leaved Portugal (with some men) to Castile and was in the service of the king of Castile. At the time he was seen as a traitor.

Until the arrival of the Dutch spies no one had the knowledge of traveling in the East as the Portuguese had.
 
Aug 2018
274
America
That is not correct, Escritor (by the way it is somehow related with your signature). What “stopped” Spanish colonialism in Asia for half a century (even if I think the word “stooped” is incorrect here, “delayed” would be more correct), was the Treaty of Tordesilhas, and the fact that the Castilians didn’t knew how to make the return to America. When that was finally full field their colonialism in Asia developed naturally.
Pray tell how Tordesillas stopped Spanish colonialism in Asia when it was signed almost 30 years before Mactan.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,877
Portugal
Pray tell how Tordesillas stopped Spanish colonialism in Asia when it was signed almost 30 years before Mactan.
Because the Treaty of Tordesilhas was still in effect and was respected between the two crowns until at least 1640, even during the period that the two crowns had the same king.

The treaty didn’t allow the Castilians to go to the Philippines trough the Atlantic/Indian Ocean route. They had to go through the longer Atlantic/Pacific route. That was why Magalhães even begun the voyage.

One of the consequences of the voyage by Magalhães/Elcano voyage was to mark the Antimeridian of the treaty. So it was signed the Treaty of Zaragoza. Basically the new treaty established the borders between the two crowns in the East. Again those limits were respected for more than a century (with somewhat limited exceptions). Again even during the period that the two crowns had the same king (1580-1640).

So, aside from the treaty, the major delay in the expansionism of the Castilians in the East of Asia was to find a link between Asia and America.

Allow me to go to the basic of the issue to Wikipedia: “The Manila-Acapulco galleon trade finally began when Spanish navigators Alonso de Arellano and Andrés de Urdaneta discovered the eastward return route in 1565. Sailing as part of the expedition commanded by Miguel López de Legazpi to conquer the Philippines in 1565, Arellano and Urdaneta were given the task of finding a return route. Reasoning that the trade winds of the Pacific might move in a gyre as the Atlantic winds did, they had to sail north to the 38th parallel north, off the east coast of Japan, before catching the eastward-blowing winds ("westerlies") that would take them back across the Pacific.”

From: Manila galleon - Wikipedia