Thoughts on Hinduism Treatment of all Living Things?

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
5,006
India
Wrt to how Jewish and Muslim folks have Halal and kosher food... Is there an equivalent name that Hindus have for food that they feel is appropriate for them?

I fully understand that some Hindus have no dietary restrictions. I suppose what I’m asking here is for the Hindus who do have religious dietary restrictions is there a name they give to food that they feel is appropriate for them?
In Hinduism and Sikhism, the slaughter method is called Jhatka (instant or Shock), the animal to be slaughtered is to be beheaded in single strike of knife. Proponent of Jhatka says, animal is killed instantly with least pain just like stunning method used in Europe. Although, Hindus are not quite particular about slaughtering method, they would eat both Halal and Jhatka and mainly Halal meat dominates the meat industry in India. Although majority of Hindus are quite rigid about not eating Beef(cow meat). Only some modern generation liberal Hindus would eat beef.
 
Jun 2017
568
usa
Would you say that Jains , Sikhs and Hindus all share a common religious legacy?

How many Jains do you think will not destroy even an insect in this world do you think it’s 90% plus of all Jains?

Would you say that there are probably no Hindus in this world who have never destroyed an insect? of these talks of shrines across the world where insects are not even harmed are those Hindu or Jain shrines?


Is there is a summary book on the Bhagavad Gita one can get their hands on ?

Wrt vegetarians and dietary restrictions among Hindus of this world. One thing I want to ask is do Hindus have an equivalent of the no meat Friday that Catholics have or the Ramadan of the Muslims where Muslims Won’t eat or drink until sunset? Or is this sort of an individual thing where for example an individual Hindu might at some random point of the year fast for some amount of time?

Jains, Hindus, Buddhists and Sikhs share same basic fundamentals. Each varies a little in the path it recommends for the ultimate union with the divine.
All of the above believe in Ahimsa, one divine energy that permeates everything, reincarnation and Moksha or Nirvana. Now they might used different terminologies but are pretty much the same thing. I am not too familiar with Sikhism. It is the newest religion and developed during a time of conflict. From what little I know, it seems like a lot of it is based on Upanishadic teachings.

How will anyone know if there is absolutely no Hindu or Jain or anyone else in the whole world who has not killed anything? I don't know what shrines you are talking about. Usually in a shrine or any place of worship you want to be as non violent as possible anyway. I am sure the religion does not matter. However, animal sacrifice is not uncommon in temples dedicated to the Goddess or in its vicinity. This is declining though.

The Commentary by Swami Chinmayanand on the Geeta is a good one.

In Hinduism there is the concept of a personal Deity or God that one considers a friend, mentor, Guru. People who believe very strongly in Shiva might fast(refrain from non vegetarian food and eat only once) on Mondays, those who are Ganesh followers the day is Tuesday while Shakti worshippers, like my mother, fast on Fridays.
There is the month of Shravan in the Hindu Calendar, during which most Hindus abstain from meat, fish, eggs and alcohol. This month roughly coincides with August, September.
Apart from the above there is always some day or another that Hindus fast during every month. Fasting is not a must but is a major aspect of Hinduism.
 
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Nov 2016
1,267
Germany
In Hinduism there is the concept of a personal Deity or God that one considers a friend, mentor, Guru.
I'm not sure what you mean. Is that meant to be generalizing or do you want to say that in Hinduism there is amongst other things also this concept?

In any case, Vedanta is the most important Hindu school and it is atheistic. The Brahman is thought to be all-encompassing and indivisible, which is incompatible with the idea of a god.

Jains, Hindus, Buddhists and Sikhs share same basic fundamentals. Each varies a little in the path it recommends for the ultimate union with the divine.
The term "divine" is quite un-Buddhist, which I'm sure you're aware of. You maybe think it's just terminological hairsplitting, but a true Buddhist would say that terminology is very important to avoid misunderstandings. "Divine" produces the misunderstanding that Buddhism has the idea of a divine being.


late Middle English: via Old French from Latin divinus, from divus ‘godlike’ (related to deus ‘god’).
 
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Jun 2017
568
usa
I'm not sure what you mean. Is that meant to be generalizing or do you want to say that in Hinduism there is amongst other things also this concept?

In any case, Vedanta is the most important Hindu school and it is atheistic. The Brahman is thought to be all-encompassing and indivisible, which is incompatible with the idea of a god.



The term "divine" is quite un-Buddhist, which I'm sure you're aware of. You maybe think it's just terminological hairsplitting, but a true Buddhist would say that terminology is very important to avoid misunderstandings. "Divine" produces the misunderstanding that Buddhism has the idea of a divine being.


late Middle English: via Old French from Latin divinus, from divus ‘godlike’ (related to deus ‘god’).

Advaita Vedanta is NOT atheistic. It is based on Upanishads and there is nothing atheistic about the Upanishads.
The beauty of Advaita is that even an atheist like Sam Harris can and is following it. He might call it "Mindfulness" or whatever but whatever he has been talking is nothing but Advaita Vedanta. I just wish he would give credit where credit is due.

Buddhism believes in Nirvana which is similar to Moksha.
 
Nov 2016
1,267
Germany
Advaita Vedanta is NOT atheistic. It is based on Upanishads and there is nothing atheistic about the Upanishads.
It's easy to prove that Vedanta is atheistic. Theism means believing in a divine being that either produces the material world or has a significant influence on it. In any case, it is not identical with the world, it is opposite it.

But Advaita Vedanta, as I wrote before, emphasizes the indivisible nature of the Brahman, that is, its non-duality. Therefore Brahman is not a god and Vedanta is not theism.

(advaita = non-dual)
 
Jun 2017
568
usa
It's easy to prove that Vedanta is atheistic. Theism means believing in a divine being that either produces the material world or has a significant influence on it. In any case, it is not identical with the world, it is opposite it.

But the Advaita Vedanta, as I wrote before, emphasizes the indivisible nature of the Brahman, that is, its non-duality. Therefore Brahman is not a god and Vedanta is not theism.

(advaita = non-dual)

You really need to read up about Advaita, Tammuz. Brahman is the divine energy that permeates everything and manifests as Maya. Please try to read the Upanishads if you can. Advaita is not atheistic and nothing wrong with it. Like I said atheists can also benefit from this philosophy and in fact do benefit from it.

It is non dual because you are part of the divine.
 
Nov 2016
1,267
Germany
You really need to read up about Advaita, Tammuz. Brahman is the divine energy that permeates everything and manifests as Maya. Please try to read the Upanishads if you can. Advaita is not atheistic and nothing wrong with it. Like I said atheists can also benefit from this philosophy and in fact do benefit from i
I know the Upanishads for 20 years :)

That Brahman manifests as Maya does not mean that Maya is anything else than Brahman. Brahman is indivisible (advaita), so Maya is only a part of Brahman. That is, Brahman is everything that exists, and that is, Brahman is not a god. Moreover Maya is only illusion, the only reality is Brahman, so it is NO god.
 
Jun 2017
568
usa
I know the Upanishads for 20 years :)

That Brahman manifests as Maya does not mean that Maya is anything else than Brahman. Brahman is indivisible (advaita), so Maya is only a part of Brahman. That is, Brahman is everything that exists, and that is, Brahman is not a god.
Sure Brahman is not "God" but it is the divine energy. No two ways about that.
I understand that Maya is no different than Brahman.
Advaita = non dual= everyone and everything has Brahman inside them as Atman. Atman is part of Brahman.
 
Nov 2016
1,267
Germany
Sure Brahman is not "God" but it is the divine energy. No two ways about that.
I understand that Maya is no different than Brahman.
Advaita = non dual= everyone and everything has Brahman inside them as Atman. Atman is part of Brahman.
So we agree that Vedanta is atheistic?