Top 10+ Gay Rulers/Emperors/Sultans/Kings/Khans etc. In History

Afrasiyab

Ad Honorem
Sep 2007
6,378
In Rome, a citizen of Rome could have same-sex relationships, especially with his (female homosexuality is more blurry) slaves. A free Roman man could be the penetrator in sex and it would be regarded okay but the reverse, a free Roman being bottom in the intercourse, would not be welcomed by the society. Apart from that, homosexuality among slaves was tolerated/ignored as they were accounted as animals. No one would blame a dog humping another in the street so the same conception applied to slaves as well.

In some areas of ancient Greece, homosexuality was not something different than heterosexuality- there was not distinct separation between them. Intercourse with women was crucial as it meant the continuation of the family.

In Central Asia, although no hard-core proof found, it was not welcomed; at least homosexuality was banned in Yasaq.

In South Asia, Afghanistan, Pakistan and surroundings, soldiers having underage 'assistant' boy was prevalent. They were called 'bacheh' and they served the soldier, took care of his horse and also served as a sexual complement. But this can also be called 'pederasty'.

In India and Pakistan, not homosexuality but being from the 'third sex' (i.e. transsexuality) is still prevalent; they are called 'Hijra' and they are believed to have some evil powers, especially on newborn babies.
 
Mar 2011
81
Macedonia
The myth of homosexuality in Ancient Greece

Part of the problem is that homosexuality, contemporary as well as ancient, is no easier for us so-called moderns to understand than it was for the Greeks. Oneof our difficulties when reading about ancient Greece is that the most common manifestation of homosexuality in the evidence concerns pederasty, the quasi-ritualized, transient, physical and emotional relationship between an older male and a youth., an activity we view as criminal. Another major impediment to understanding homosexuality for both ancients and moderns is the confusion of nature and culture in explaining it.

One argument against the unqualified acceptance by the Greeks of homosexuality is the prevalence of the male-female sexual pattern in the references to same-sex relations, which suggests that the heterosexual paradigm is the "natural" one that homosexual relations mimic and pattern themselves after. As Aristotle says, "The affection between, man and woman appears to happen according to nature, for humans by nature are disposed to live in pairs more than in political communities." W.C. Lacey (1968), a brilliant Cambridge classical scholar wrote, in his comprehensive examination of family life of ancient Greece:
"We are sometimes told that the Greeks were fully bisexual, enjoying both homosexual and heterosexual intercourse, and that romantic love in Greece was associated with attachments to boys and not to girls. Whatever the truth of the latter statement, there can be no doubt that, while the Greeks had a deep admiration for the physical beauty of the young male, in Athens the practice of sodomy was strictly circumscribed by law.
Boys still at school were protected against sexual assaults by a law (said to go as far back as Dracon and Solon), and we hear of strict regulations about schools with this in mind; schoolboys always had a paidagogos escorting them; in art the paidagogos is always depicted as carrying a long and heavy stick; what was this for if not to protect their charges?"
Ancient Greek has several insulting epithets that derive their force from the disgust felt toward those who allow themselves to be sodomized. Indeed, for a society considered tolerant of a wide spectrum of sexual behavior, the ancient Greeks possessed a much wider public vocabulary of homosexual disparagement, outside the public rest room, than a sexually uptight America can call on. Two of those epithets from ancient Greece—euproktos, "wide-anused," and katapugon, "passive homosexual, lecher"—are compounds built around the words pug, "rump," and proktos, "anus." This obsession with the anus reflects the Greek contempt for the man who endures anal penetration.So the term “homosexual” is an unknown word and most important must not confused with the terms that had different meaning for the Ancient Greeks.
 
Mar 2011
1,209
The Carolinas
Its said that Henry III of France was homosexual.

Possibly bisexual. He was reportedly fond of his wife Louise de Lorraine-Vaudemont, though a severe miscarriage would prevent them from having any children. And he fell for his wife Louise because the woman he had originally fancied, the princesse de conde: Marie de Cleves, had died before Henri could secure a divorce for Marie from her husband.
A little bit on Louise and Henri: http://derniersvalois.canalblog.com/archives/les_reines_de_france/p10-0.html



But as to this thread, I'm surprised no one has mentioned Christina of Sweden, [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_of_Sweden"]Christina, Queen of Sweden - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

It is and was widely believed that she was a lesbian. She had several intimate female companions and possibly converted to Catholicism for a lover. Christina aslo prefered to dress in men's clothing or a very masculine form of women's clothing at the time.
 

gladiatrice

Ad Honorem
Oct 2013
3,463
Montreal, QC
Thread revival, yay!



James VI of Scotland/I of England was an admirable ruler. I still don't understand how his homosexuality applies to his capability to rule, though. All the documentaries I've seen about him make a big deal out of his sexual preference, instead of the KJVB or his political policies... :persevere:
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,783
SoCal
Thread revival, yay!



James VI of Scotland/I of England was an admirable ruler. I still don't understand how his homosexuality applies to his capability to rule, though. All the documentaries I've seen about him make a big deal out of his sexual preference, instead of the KJVB or his political policies... :persevere:
King James was not gay; at most, he might have been bisexual, but as far as I know, even this is not confirmed.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,949
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Oda Nobunaga is believed by some to have had a sexual relationship with his page, Mori Ranmaru, but that wasn't unusual amongst the samurai - it was a kind of institutionalised pederasty. Many daimyo had similar relationships.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,783
SoCal
Oda Nobunaga is believed by some to have had a sexual relationship with his page, Mori Ranmaru, but that wasn't unusual amongst the samurai - it was a kind of institutionalised pederasty. Many daimyo had similar relationships.
Ah Yes, gay relationships in masculine cultures; heck, this reminds me a bit of Ernst Rohm and other gay members of the SA.
 

gladiatrice

Ad Honorem
Oct 2013
3,463
Montreal, QC
King James was not gay; at most, he might have been bisexual, but as far as I know, even this is not confirmed.
He went around kissing his male courtiers and had something going on with his favorite George Villiers... He was probably bisexual, but that still fits into the spectrum. Again, that in no way hampered his kingship. I don't know why people hound it so much whenever talking about him. It's probably the least important thing in his 57 year reign.