Career Guidance Top 5 most regretted majors(history is one of them)

Jun 2015
1,252
Scotland
Most kids seem to avoid the difficult ones. Universities struggle to fill all the places in engineering and physical sciences. It's a bit sad but I can understand it. I did Electrical and Electronic Engineering and it was a tough one, we had to do 2nd year degree maths just to understand the science.
 
Mar 2007
266
Philadelphia
My father refused to help me pay for college unless I majored in Business. I did that for two years, then decided I wanted to pursue my own dream of becoming a journalist. Rather than majoring in Journalism (another one of the Top 5 Regrettable Majors), I majored in English (Creative Writing).

As a teenager, I'd worked for our local newspaper, so didn't need any journalism courses. I already knew how to write a news article. They're fairly formulaic and rather easy to compose. I figured a Creative Writing degree would give me more skills as a writer.

Naturally, my father stopped paying my tuition. So I started my own house painting business and got a job as a resident assistant at the university (which paid 1/2 my tuition and all my room & board). So I came out of college with an Associate degree in Business and a Bachelor's in English - and most importantly, no loans.

Worked as a newspaper reporter for a few years (making pittance), then my father grew ill. As the eldest, to help my family, I took over my father's business and ran it for 10 years (and made piles of money). My younger brother finished college and came into the business with me. I trained him, turned the reins over to him, then quit to go back to writing.

Used the money I made in business to pay for my Master's in Education. Taught high school English for a while, then a company offered me a job as a creative writer (copywriter) for an advertising agency. Still doing that today, while writing magazine articles and historical fiction on the side.

My dad used to tell me that majoring in English was a waste of money. He said, I'd never get a job with a Writing degree. Over the years, I've had 5 jobs working as a writer. I do not make anything close to the money I did in business, but my goal in life has never been to become rich. It's to be able to pay my bills, achieve some sense of satisfaction, and enjoy going to work every day - which I never did in business.

It's a wonderful life.
 
Jan 2013
638
My father refused to help me pay for college unless I majored in Business. I did that for two years, then decided I wanted to pursue my own dream of becoming a journalist. Rather than majoring in Journalism (another one of the Top 5 Regrettable Majors), I majored in English (Creative Writing).

As a teenager, I'd worked for our local newspaper, so didn't need any journalism courses. I already knew how to write a news article. They're fairly formulaic and rather easy to compose. I figured a Creative Writing degree would give me more skills as a writer.

Naturally, my father stopped paying my tuition. So I started my own house painting business and got a job as a resident assistant at the university (which paid 1/2 my tuition and all my room & board). So I came out of college with an Associate degree in Business and a Bachelor's in English - and most importantly, no loans.

Worked as a newspaper reporter for a few years (making pittance), then my father grew ill. As the eldest, to help my family, I took over my father's business and ran it for 10 years (and made piles of money). My younger brother finished college and came into the business with me. I trained him, turned the reins over to him, then quit to go back to writing.

Used the money I made in business to pay for my Master's in Education. Taught high school English for a while, then a company offered me a job as a creative writer (copywriter) for an advertising agency. Still doing that today, while writing magazine articles and historical fiction on the side.

My dad used to tell me that majoring in English was a waste of money. He said, I'd never get a job with a Writing degree. Over the years, I've had 5 jobs working as a writer. I do not make anything close to the money I did in business, but my goal in life has never been to become rich. It's to be able to pay my bills, achieve some sense of satisfaction, and enjoy going to work every day - which I never did in business.

It's a wonderful life.
Very interesting. And did the business associate's degree help you in running your father's business? It seems that when it comes down to it, you have managed to make a living out of your writing, helped by the English degree, but this was only made possible because of the business which allowed you to do the education degree also?

My grandfather had a similar story to yours, in a way. He was the eldest son of a family where everyone pitched in to run a manufacturing business, but he had other ideas and went to study zoology. He went back to run the business for a while after his degree, but eventually settled on a career in science, in the employ of the European Union. Unfortunately many humanities students don't come from a business background and don't have the option of going into their parent's business: I know I don't. It was clear to me from a young age that I'd never become successful in anything if I did a technical or vocational degree, because I don't have the work ethic, so I took the only subject I was good at and chose to see where it would take me. In the event it didn't take me anywhere useful but it was better than being bored to tears for three years. I could do a law conversion but there isn't enough money in the world to make me sit at a table for 10 hours every day learning case law.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,601
Florania
Very interesting. And did the business associate's degree help you in running your father's business? It seems that when it comes down to it, you have managed to make a living out of your writing, helped by the English degree, but this was only made possible because of the business which allowed you to do the education degree also?

My grandfather had a similar story to yours, in a way. He was the eldest son of a family where everyone pitched in to run a manufacturing business, but he had other ideas and went to study zoology. He went back to run the business for a while after his degree, but eventually settled on a career in science, in the employ of the European Union. Unfortunately many humanities students don't come from a business background and don't have the option of going into their parent's business: I know I don't. It was clear to me from a young age that I'd never become successful in anything if I did a technical or vocational degree, because I don't have the work ethic, so I took the only subject I was good at and chose to see where it would take me. In the event it didn't take me anywhere useful but it was better than being bored to tears for three years. I could do a law conversion but there isn't enough money in the world to make me sit at a table for 10 hours every day learning case law.
Education does not always apply directly, but we should think of the transferable trainings and skills.
 
Jun 2016
489
Roman Empire
I did political science, and regret not doing acting.

Considering I am treated like absolute dirt in politics, and I do have significant talent when it comes to acting.... I couldn't possibly be doing any worse with that. :/ Maybe I would've made it by now. *Sigh*
 

Asherman

Forum Staff
May 2013
3,405
Albuquerque, NM
Choices: Cause the restoration of the Roman Empire, with myself a Emperor v. Acting.

Show some sense, and go with acting. The odds are far better, but just to be safe you might want to get a day job somewhere. Taco Bell?
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,518
Las Vegas, NV USA
Insurance adjusters may have less than glamorous jobs but they have great power over hapless people filing claims. It pays well too provided you have a heart of stone. BTW I am not an insurance adjuster.
 
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May 2018
33
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I don't understand why someone who is genuinely passionate about history or any humanistic subject ftm and wouldn't mind being in a university most of their lives would be too concerned about employment. Surely you won't mind going down the funded research path if you're really interested in and good at the subject, attempt to earn a PhD and ultimately land some position in some school, college or university.