Top Early Modern(1496-1796) generals in Europe?

Aug 2012
189
United States
The early modern period in europe saw a large contribution to the art of war from many brilliant and inspiring generals. This is my list of the top generals of this period.

1. Aleksandr Suvorov
-Brilliant in the art of mobility, speed, and concentration. He defined a method of warfare that would prove very successful for him.

2. John Churchill (Duke of Marlborough)
-A rare general that was brilliant in nearly every aspect of warfare.(tactics, strategy, logistics and an adept statesmen.)

3. Gustav II Adolf
-He took innovations from different nations(Poles, dutch), with his own changes and created a form of warfare that would be copied by nearly every European army. Not to mention his abilities in the field.

4. Henri de La Tour d'Auvergne de Turenne
-The master of strategy and one of the most underrated generals(imo), his strategic abilities on multiple occasions completely baffled his enemies

5. Frederick II of Prussia
-Somewhat of a mixed bag at times, his brilliance in grand tactics and his use of interior lines outweigh some of his failings as a commander.

6. Eugene of Savoy
-Brilliant military mind and along with marlborough challenged and surpassed the military thought of the early 18th century. Not to mention the brilliant Turin campaign

7. Maurice, comte de Saxe
-Great example of a brilliant commander that was able to overcome some of the failings of the french army. His alignment at Fontenoy showed a great tactical ability.

8. Maurice of Nassau
-The original mind behind the beginnings of linear warfare. He helped pioneer the reduction of ranks and the disciplined firing techniques.

9. Gonzalo de Córdoba (El Gran Capitán)
-Known as the father of trench warfare, he understood the use of defensive works and his combination of pikes with muskets was the early beginnings of the tercio.

10. Raimondo Montecuccoli
-A very good strategist that also turned out to be a brilliant military thinker who left his thoughts on the art of war.

11. Charles XII
-A great proponent of the offensive, he was a great tactician that struggled as a grand strategist.

12. Claude-Louis-Hector de Villars
-The best french general of the War of Spanish Succession, his maneuver at denain was pure brilliance.

13. Duke of Parma (Alessandro Farnese)
-Another great strategist that was known more for his sieges that battles

14. James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose
-Another underrated commander that proved to be an adept tactician and a very daring commander consistently defeating disciplined armies.

15. Stanislaw Koniecpolski
-being able to run a successful campaign against Gustavus Adolphus, while using inferior forces earns you a spot on this list.

16. Louis II de Bourbon, Prince de Condé
-The inspiring leader and victor of the action at Rocroi, Conde was at times a great tactician but could also be an uninspiring strategist.

17. Jan III Sobieski
-The hero of the battle of Vienna, he reformed the polish army and was very successful against the ottomans throughout his career.

18. François-Henri de Montmorency, duc de Luxembourg
-The victor of the battle of Steenkerque and Neerwinden Luxembourg was another in a line of brilliant french marshals, starting with Conde/Turenne and ending with Maurice de Saxe.

19. Robert Clive
-The victor of Plassey he helped to establish the military superiority of the british in india.

20. James Fitzjames, 1st Duke of Berwick
- His campaigns in spain durring the spanish succession war showed a acute understanding of positional warfare.

What is yours?
 
Mar 2014
8,881
Canterbury
As far as guerrilla commanders go, you'd be hard-pressed to find one better than Niall Odhar Macleod. The odds he was up against were simply extreme, but he prevailed, and stopped a genocide. He is ridiculously obscure, though: the anti-colonial war on the island of Lewis (1598-1626) does not feature in a lot of reading lists ;)

I find Montrose to be overrated, because people underestimate his armies. He had good, capable, experienced, and steadfast troops, not a rabble. But he was undeniably very good.
 
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Dir

Nov 2015
1,960
Kyiv
Why did you forget the Battle of Khotin (1621) - one of the greatest battles of that period?

There 150-300,000 (according to various sources) Tatars and Turks fought against 35,000 Poles, 40,000 Ukrainian Cossacks, 25,000 Lithuanians, with the participation of German Reiters. It was near the fortress Khotin (Chotyn) in the Western Ukraine

The battle was since September, 2 to October, 9



Grand Hetman Chodkiewicz died during the battle on September 24. Later the Commonwealth lost another of its most notable military figures - the Hetman of Registered Cossacks Petro Konashevych-Sahaidachny, who replaced Chodkiewicz during the battle and won it - and couldn't recover from battle injuries and died several months later.

After the battlen young Sultan Osman II got the uprising of the Janissaries in 1622, in which he was deposed and killed
 
Feb 2015
640
washington
The early modern period in europe saw a large contribution to the art of war from many brilliant and inspiring generals. This is my list of the top generals of this period.

1. Aleksandr Suvorov
-Brilliant in the art of mobility, speed, and concentration. He defined a method of warfare that would prove very successful for him.

2. John Churchill (Duke of Marlborough)
-A rare general that was brilliant in nearly every aspect of warfare.(tactics, strategy, logistics and an adept statesmen.)

3. Gustav II Adolf
-He took innovations from different nations(Poles, dutch), with his own changes and created a form of warfare that would be copied by nearly every European army. Not to mention his abilities in the field.

4. Henri de La Tour d'Auvergne de Turenne
-The master of strategy and one of the most underrated generals(imo), his strategic abilities on multiple occasions completely baffled his enemies

5. Frederick II of Prussia
-Somewhat of a mixed bag at times, his brilliance in grand tactics and his use of interior lines outweigh some of his failings as a commander.

6. Eugene of Savoy
-Brilliant military mind and along with marlborough challenged and surpassed the military thought of the early 18th century. Not to mention the brilliant Turin campaign

7. Maurice, comte de Saxe
-Great example of a brilliant commander that was able to overcome some of the failings of the french army. His alignment at Fontenoy showed a great tactical ability.

8. Maurice of Nassau
-The original mind behind the beginnings of linear warfare. He helped pioneer the reduction of ranks and the disciplined firing techniques.

9. Gonzalo de Córdoba (El Gran Capitán)
-Known as the father of trench warfare, he understood the use of defensive works and his combination of pikes with muskets was the early beginnings of the tercio.

10. Raimondo Montecuccoli
-A very good strategist that also turned out to be a brilliant military thinker who left his thoughts on the art of war.

11. Charles XII
-A great proponent of the offensive, he was a great tactician that struggled as a grand strategist.

12. Claude-Louis-Hector de Villars
-The best french general of the War of Spanish Succession, his maneuver at denain was pure brilliance.

13. Duke of Parma (Alessandro Farnese)
-Another great strategist that was known more for his sieges that battles

14. James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose
-Another underrated commander that proved to be an adept tactician and a very daring commander consistently defeating disciplined armies.

15. Stanislaw Koniecpolski
-being able to run a successful campaign against Gustavus Adolphus, while using inferior forces earns you a spot on this list.

16. Louis II de Bourbon, Prince de Condé
-The inspiring leader and victor of the action at Rocroi, Conde was at times a great tactician but could also be an uninspiring strategist.

17. Jan III Sobieski
-The hero of the battle of Vienna, he reformed the polish army and was very successful against the ottomans throughout his career.

18. François-Henri de Montmorency, duc de Luxembourg
-The victor of the battle of Steenkerque and Neerwinden Luxembourg was another in a line of brilliant french marshals, starting with Conde/Turenne and ending with Maurice de Saxe.

19. Robert Clive
-The victor of Plassey he helped to establish the military superiority of the british in india.

20. James Fitzjames, 1st Duke of Berwick
- His campaigns in spain durring the spanish succession war showed a acute understanding of positional warfare.

What is yours?
Decent list, even if its only europeans.
Mine would be
1. Duke of Marlborough
2. Nader Shah
3. Eugene of Savoy
4. Gustav Adolf
5. Maurice De Saxe
6. Alexander Suvorov
7. Karl XII
8. Frederick the Great
9. Turenne
10. Selim Yawmuz
 
Nov 2015
1,016
Ayton
May I ask why you feel that way?
I like Turenne becayse he sounds as if he carries soup around. He was also Marshall of France. That's one hell of a big place to be a Marshall of. Bearing in mind that France didn't have Sherriffs!

Churchill, like Thatcher sent the army against his own citizens and Used Poisoned Gas on the Kurds. Even so, he was proved right about the Germans tooling up for War but he wasn't really a General as such. Was he?