Tramways de l'Aude

Aug 2018
101
Ashton-under-Lyne
#1
This is a further series of posts which address the early 20th Century in France through the history of transport. ......

My wife and I are spending a week or so in a village to the southwest of Carcassonne in France during September 2018. A little bit of research highlighted the existence of a network of metre-gauge tramways in the Aude. These tramways were only in operation for a few decades in the early part of 20th Century. Other matters will take priority during much of the time that we are in the department but I am interested in these lines and have pulled together a blog which gives an overview of the lines and which is based around a French Wikipedia article about the lines.

http://rogerfarnworth.com/2018/08/27/tramways-de-laude-overview-part-1

The plan is to look at the different lines in turn in future posts.
 
Nov 2017
628
Győr
#3
This is a further series of posts which address the early 20th Century in France through the history of transport. ......

My wife and I are spending a week or so in a village to the southwest of Carcassonne in France during September 2018. A little bit of research highlighted the existence of a network of metre-gauge tramways in the Aude. These tramways were only in operation for a few decades in the early part of 20th Century. Other matters will take priority during much of the time that we are in the department but I am interested in these lines and have pulled together a blog which gives an overview of the lines and which is based around a French Wikipedia article about the lines.

http://rogerfarnworth.com/2018/08/27/tramways-de-laude-overview-part-1

The plan is to look at the different lines in turn in future posts.
it was not until 1890 that the first électric tram was opened in Clermont-Ferrand, and in 1895 the Tramway de Versailles was converted from steam power to electric power.

So we can conclude, that France and Paris was not in the forefront of public urban transport in Europe.
 
Aug 2018
101
Ashton-under-Lyne
#4
it was not until 1890 that the first électric tram was opened in Clermont-Ferrand, and in 1895 the Tramway de Versailles was converted from steam power to electric power.

So we can conclude, that France and Paris was not in the forefront of public urban transport in Europe.
Interesting thought, although things are probably a little more complex than you suggest. France played a leading role in the development of steam power and more recently has become the leading authority on high speed rail between cities. There were also some very innovative techniques used to create the underground in Paris.

All of this might be worthy of further exploration at some stage on this forum. ...:)
 
Aug 2018
101
Ashton-under-Lyne
#5
This next post follows up the first overview of the Tramways de l'Aude with information which comes from the first of a series articles from 1961 .....

https://rogerfarnworth.com/2018/08/31/tramways-de-laude-overview-part-2

This second part of the overview of Les Tramways de l’Aude is based on the first of a series of three articles provided by Loco-Revue in its magazine in late 1961, written in French by C. Lacombe. It is not a direct translation, and it seeks not to repeat information already provided in the first post in this series. [1] Inaddition a short set of notes are provided about the Compagnie du Midi which also served the department de l’Aude. Another post will look at the remaining articles by C. Lacombe. ….
 
Nov 2017
628
Győr
#6
Interesting thought, although things are probably a little more complex than you suggest. France played a leading role in the development of steam power and more recently has become the leading authority on high speed rail between cities. There were also some very innovative techniques used to create the underground in Paris.

All of this might be worthy of further exploration at some stage on this forum. ...:)
France was only the third country which built an underground system among European countries. So it was not the first in underground technology. Their electric tramway system also appeared very very late.
 
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Aug 2018
101
Ashton-under-Lyne
#8
This is the third part part of the overview and covers much about the locomotives and rolling stock on the line.

http://rogerfarnworth.com/2018/08/31/tramways-de-laude-overview-part-3

On 28th December 1910, the train for Olonzac painfully climbed the coast of Felines, with a strong head-wind in the storm. But the Corpet-Louvert 0-6-0T reached the top of the gradient despite the strength of the wind. However, on the last curve before the pass which separates the departments of Aude and Herault, and 50 m from the summit, the train suddenly exposed its flank to the enemy and the three passenger cars and the van overturned against the embankment.

Three years later, on 28th November 1913, Train No. 144, towed by Corpet-Louvert No. 40, consisting of three freight cars, two passenger coaches and a van, left Narbonne at 9:55am for Thézan. The wind blew violently and the locomotive struggled against it. Even so, the trip seemed to be going relatively well. However, just 6 km from its destination after the train had passed Saint-Andre Station, the wind redoubled in violence. The locomotive swayed heavily but remained on the track, so did the three freight cars, but the two coaches and the van were lifted bodily and thrown into the vineyard alongside the track.