Trying to Find Information About Gottschee Resettlements / Gottscheers / Gottschee Germans

macon

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
3,928
Slovenia, EU
#31
I think you would enjoy your stay here.

Maglich sounds Slovene (Maglič), but this isn't surprising. A lot of Slovenes have German surnames and a lot of Germans living here had Slovene surnames. It was probably spelled Maglitsch though.

I don't want to scare you, but I was just listening to the radio while eating lunch and it seems a woman was attacked today at 5.30 am. Looks like we've jinxed something with our conversation here. It wasn't near Kočevski Rog though and she was only slightly injured. The last attack that I remember before that was probably a couple of years back, they're very rare and almost never fatal as brown bears aren't as agressive as grizzlies. They're thinning their population this year, some 200 are scheduled to get shot. I've actually never seen a bear in the wild in my life. There are none at all where I live.
I don't think that Maglič exists, I never heard for a one. There are either Naglič or Meglič. I can't find Maglič on a net, I would presume Meglič.
 
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Shtajerc

Ad Honorem
Jul 2014
6,597
Lower Styria, Slovenia
#32
I don't think that Maglič exist, I never heard for a one. There are either Naglič or Meglič. I can't find Maglič on a net, I would presume Meglič.
That would make sense actually. If we assume Meglič was pronounced like Məglič, it could have been spelled as Mäglitsch per Gottscheer orthography because they often marked ə as ä.
 
Feb 2019
584
Pennsylvania, US
#33
I think you would enjoy your stay here.

Maglich sounds Slovene (Maglič), but this isn't surprising. A lot of Slovenes have German surnames and a lot of Germans living here had Slovene surnames. It was probably spelled Maglitsch though.

I don't want to scare you, but I was just listening to the radio while eating lunch and it seems a woman was attacked today at 5.30 am. Looks like we've jinxed something with our conversation here. It wasn't near Kočevski Rog though and she was only slightly injured. The last attack that I remember before that was probably a couple of years back, they're very rare and almost never fatal as brown bears aren't as agressive as grizzlies. They're thinning their population this year, some 200 are scheduled to get shot. I've actually never seen a bear in the wild in my life. There are none at all where I live.
That's okay - it doesn't scare me too much (or not enough to make me more sensible - LOL!). It seems like all of my recent vacation plans start off rather well and always end up with some element of impending doom. :lol: They begin with the intention of getting away from everything and end in this sort of man-against-nature or man-against-himself sort of outcome. I think I read too many Jack London novels at a formative age.

Poor woman... We have bears in the States - black bears are more prevalent where I live, though I have friends who travel out of state to hunt brown bears and grizzlies. One friend was in a tree stand when he shot a bear on the ground - the bear quickly spotted him and started climbing the tree to get to him.... he shot blindly through the floor of the tree stand a bunch of times and finally killed the bear... it had him pretty frightened. Do they allow people to carry bear spray / pepper spray in Slovenia? Not that it works in every case, but hey... better than the unarmed human versus bear odds! :think:
 
Feb 2019
584
Pennsylvania, US
#34
I don't think that Maglič exists, I never heard for a one. There are either Naglič or Meglič. I can't find Maglič on a net, I would presume Meglič.
That would make sense actually. If we assume Meglič was pronounced like Məglič, it could have been spelled as Mäglitsch per Gottscheer orthography because they often marked ə as ä.
This is very interesting! Thank you both for your insights!!!

I wouldn't be surprised if their family name were changed - they changed their first names from Ignatius and Therese to James and Rosie (LOL - how sadly anglisized!). U.S. immigration inspector or ship manifest misspellings seemed to be somewhat common. They must have left Europe with their original names and by the time of the 1910 U.S. census, they had completely different names / spellings.
 

Shtajerc

Ad Honorem
Jul 2014
6,597
Lower Styria, Slovenia
#35
That's okay - it doesn't scare me too much (or not enough to make me more sensible - LOL!). It seems like all of my recent vacation plans start off rather well and always end up with some element of impending doom. :lol: They begin with the intention of getting away from everything and end in this sort of man-against-nature or man-against-himself sort of outcome. I think I read too many Jack London novels at a formative age.

Poor woman... We have bears in the States - black bears are more prevalent where I live, though I have friends who travel out of state to hunt brown bears and grizzlies. One friend was in a tree stand when he shot a bear on the ground - the bear quickly spotted him and started climbing the tree to get to him.... he shot blindly through the floor of the tree stand a bunch of times and finally killed the bear... it had him pretty frightened. Do they allow people to carry bear spray / pepper spray in Slovenia? Not that it works in every case, but hey... better than the unarmed human versus bear odds! :think:
Oh my, your vacations sound like a bit too much excitement for my taste. o_O You probably won't face a survival situation in Slovenia, unless you go wandering in the Alps prepared as badly as a Czech tourist ... There's not many true outbacks left here like the wast swaths of wilderness you see in some countries. You won't encounter any bears in about half of the country at all while in the other half they're quite plentyful. Bear spray is sold freely here, so it must be legal.

That's quite a change from Ignatius and Therese to James and Rosie. I guess back then people tried hard to integrate as much as possible and make their names sound as American as it could get.
 

Grimald

Ad Honorem
Nov 2011
5,904
Hercynian Forest
#36
This is very interesting! Thank you both for your insights!!!

I wouldn't be surprised if their family name were changed - they changed their first names from Ignatius and Therese to James and Rosie (LOL - how sadly anglisized!). U.S. immigration inspector or ship manifest misspellings seemed to be somewhat common. They must have left Europe with their original names and by the time of the 1910 U.S. census, they had completely different names / spellings.
There is actually an online list of all the people that were resettled in 1941 from Gottschee (Gottschee Gottscheer). In that list, an innkeeper named Julie Maglitsch, born 1 September 1900, can be found.

Maglitsch sounds like a germanized version of an original Slavic name; such transcribed Slavic names are very common in Austria and Germany. If you transcribe it into English, you would end up with Maglich. You can find many other examples of such transcriptions, e.g. Slovene Mihič, German Mihitsch, English Mihich. Whether a family name like Maglič exists, I'll leave up to our members who are more familiar with Slovene and other Slavic languages.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#37
There is actually an online list of all the people that were resettled in 1941 from Gottschee (Gottschee Gottscheer). In that list, an innkeeper named Julie Maglitsch, born 1 September 1900, can be found.

Maglitsch sounds like a germanized version of an original Slavic name; such transcribed Slavic names are very common in Austria and Germany. If you transcribe it into English, you would end up with Maglich. You can find many other examples of such transcriptions, e.g. Slovene Mihič, German Mihitsch, English Mihich. Whether a family name like Maglič exists, I'll leave up to our members who are more familiar with Slovene and other Slavic languages.
It would be interesting if the family of this Julie (she herself is undoubtedly dead by now, given that she'd be 118 right now) is related to Niobe in any way. :)
 
Feb 2019
584
Pennsylvania, US
#38
Oh my, your vacations sound like a bit too much excitement for my taste.
Well, these are all "plans" (just a lot of talk... right now). I should just go on a sort of survivalist trip and get it all out of my system... prove whatever it is that I feel I need to prove to myself - face death, come home, make tea... live quietly again. :lol:

That's quite a change from Ignatius and Therese to James and Rosie. I guess back then people tried hard to integrate as much as possible and make their names sound as American as it could get.
It's understandable to want to adapt to their new home, but I find it a little sad. Ignatius is such a great name ('Fiery', 'Fiery One'?)!
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#39
Oh my, your vacations sound like a bit too much excitement for my taste. o_O You probably won't face a survival situation in Slovenia, unless you go wandering in the Alps prepared as badly as a Czech tourist ... There's not many true outbacks left here like the wast swaths of wilderness you see in some countries. You won't encounter any bears in about half of the country at all while in the other half they're quite plentyful. Bear spray is sold freely here, so it must be legal.

That's quite a change from Ignatius and Therese to James and Rosie. I guess back then people tried hard to integrate as much as possible and make their names sound as American as it could get.
Where'd you get these names from?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#40
Well, these are all "plans" (just a lot of talk... right now). I should just go on a sort of survivalist trip and get it all out of my system... prove whatever it is that I feel I need to prove to myself - face death, come home, make tea... live quietly again. :lol:
If you're afraid of death, get cryogenically preserved after you will die. Seriously. :)

It's understandable to want to adapt to their new home, but I find it a little sad. Ignatius is such a great name ('Fiery', 'Fiery One'?)!
Frankly, I like the name Sylvanus ("Of the woods," I think) better (like Sylvanus Thayer, the "Father of West Point"). It's not German, but oh well!
 

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