Types of warriors from countries

At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
4,004
Bulgaria
England: billmen - bill was used as melee weapon for English soldiers during the late medieval period ; longbowmen - everyone knows the history of english longbow, Agincourt etc.

Ireland - kerns (light skirmishing infantry) and gallowglasses (norse gaelic with their famous claymore)

Poland / Polish Lithuanian commonwealth - late medieval winged Hussars and Lithuanian light cavalry

Hungary - Székely warriors, the finest warriors of medieval Transylvania

Germany /Holy Roman empire (HRE) - Landsknechts (notorious early modern German mercenaries)
 
Sep 2012
1,140
Tarkington, Texas
You really need to limit the time period. Americans are famous for their Light Infantry (Rangers) in early times. The Great Plains were famous for Light Cavalry (Indians). As time passes you run into other types. Riflemen were famous during the early 19th Century (up to ACW). During the ACW, you ran into Cavalry (Pistol and Carbine armed). Twentieth Century opened more types of warriors.

Pruitt
 
Oct 2019
2
ca
You really need to limit the time period. Americans are famous for their Light Infantry (Rangers) in early times. The Great Plains were famous for Light Cavalry (Indians). As time passes you run into other types. Riflemen were famous during the early 19th Century (up to ACW). During the ACW, you ran into Cavalry (Pistol and Carbine armed). Twentieth Century opened more types of warriors.

Pruitt
My bad, more so Medieval time periods is what I'm looking for
 
Oct 2019
68
United States
IRA of the 70s warriors? What great battles did they fight? What epic fears of courage did they pull off?
I remember them as cowards who preferred murdering civillians to any form of actual combat.
Guerrilla means warrior, yes, and of course non combatants are legitimate targets in war.
 

Edric Streona

Ad Honorem
Feb 2016
4,513
Japan
Well Guerilla doesn’t mean warrior. It means “little war”.
And the IRA of the 70s and 80s did not wage a guerilla campaign, the didnt dare. They ran a terror campaign like a certain modern religious group.
And civilians are NOT legitimate targets in war...
not babies.
Not teenagers drinking in pubs.
Not a people in a chip shop.
Not tourists out shopping.
Not some textile factory workers trying to go home.
All of which the IRA liked to kill far more often than actual soldiers.

Can you name one actual battle the IRA fought?
 
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Edric Streona

Ad Honorem
Feb 2016
4,513
Japan
^ Well, there goes this thread. Gonna have tommies and nira at each others throats in a minute...
Doubt we’d have any one from the IRA on a history forum.
A couple of ex squaddies maybe.... tommies... not sure thought that’s just for WW2 and before soldiers.
 
May 2019
215
Earth
tommies... not sure thought that’s just for WW2 and before soldiers.
I was trying to avoid "limey". Too cliche ;)

To the OP, I might throw in the Rondartschier for the German states, though I don't think they're well-known enough to be 'iconic'...
 

Zip

Jan 2018
566
Comancheria
Well Guerilla doesn’t mean warrior. It means “little war”.
And the IRA of the 70s and 80s did not wage a guerilla campaign, the didnt dare. They ran a terror campaign like a certain modern religious group.
And civilians are NOT legitimate targets in war...
not babies.
Not teenagers drinking in pubs.
Not a people in a chip shop.
Not tourists out shopping.
Not some textile factory workers trying to go home.
They were considered legitimate targets by both the British and Americans during WW II. And of course while the British were conquering Ireland all Irish were considered legitimate targets.

And in tribal war all the people of the enemy tribe are considered legitimate targets. I think the fighting in Northern Ireland had a tribal aspect.

The sad fact is that people define who is and isn't a legitimate target of war by what best suits their interests at a given time.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,972
Portugal
Guerrilla means warrior, yes, and of course non combatants are legitimate targets in war.
The term “guerrilha” comes from the Portuguese little/small war (guerra + pequenina), as Eric stated, it’s documented use for the first time was in a letter from Beresford, in Portuguese, to the Portuguese officer Manoel António during the Napoleonic Wars ( 8/9/1810). The term was probably coined in 1809, but had a French antecedent in the previous century with a different meaning: in the work by Marquis de Grandmaison, “La Petite Guèrre”, published in 1756.

The term in Spanish “guerrilla” means exactly the same and was popularized in Spain immediately after. Before that the Spanish used several other term: “quadrilla”, see: “Reglamento de Partidas e Quadrillas”, 28/12/1808.

"Guerilla" appears in Spanish documents in 1811.