Types of warriors from countries

Sep 2012
1,140
Tarkington, Texas
I got a Medieval Warfare Magazine a while back that described how the Moors and Christians used Light Infantry in the wars between them. Moors had Archers and Javilenmen. The main difference between the two types was the Christians would be more likely to have armor. This reminded me at the time of how the Iberian Tribes tended to have the bulk of their troops in similar troops. I was wondering if any of the readers here had run into a similar observation.

Pruitt
 
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May 2009
1,335
Hungary had various orders of knights. One of the cooler orders was the Black Legion of Hungary from the 15th century. They were unique for the period in their heavy reliance on firearms (in this case the arquebus)
 
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M9Powell

Ad Honorem
Oct 2014
4,455
appalacian Mtns
I would nominate the Gallowglass as the best example of Irish warrior. They started out as Scot mercinaries, but later there were many native Irish Gallowglass. There were also some kinship ties between some of the Scottish clans & the Irish , such as the McNeils & the O'Neils. The O'Neils had many Scot kin come to their aid & serve as Gallowglass.
 
Dec 2013
45
Finland
Some ideas in addition to those mentioned before:

England - My vote would be either Longbowmen or the Redcoats. I think British Expeditionary Force (BFI) also deserves a mention.
Ireland - Fianna - Fianna - Wikipedia
Poland - Polish cavalry, especially lancers, was renowned in the Napoleonic times. Winged hussars are probably the most well-known example at the moment.
Hungary - Hungarian hussars were rather famous in the past, contributing to the widespread usage of the term "Hussar".
Germany - Germans!!! (even if Germany did not exist as a nation at that time :p).
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,972
Portugal
I got a Medieval Warfare Magazine a while back that described how the Moors and Christians used Light Infantry in the wars between them. Moors had Archers and Javilenmen. The main difference between the two types was the Christians would be more likely to have armor. This reminded me at the time of how the Iberian Tribes tended to have the bulk of their troops in similar troops. I was wondering if any of the readers here had run into a similar observation.
Moors in the Medieval Iberian context is a synonymous of Muslims. The Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula would be equipped almost exactly to the Christians, along the seven centuries of the “Reconquista”, both Christians and Muslims got heavier in armour. And both had javelinmen, archers and even slingers (this last at least until the 12th century).

In the Ancient period the tribes in the Iberian Peninsula, among them the Iberians and Vascones, and other pre-Indo-European, but also the Indo-European as the Celts and the Lusitanians used Javelinmen. So in that perspective there was a continuity.

That continuity also existed in the North of Africa, from the Mauri and Numidians, to the African “Moors”.

But these kind of weapons were also used north of the Pyrenees. Although javelins and slings were eventually dropped sooner.

It was the part that could be implied here: “In Medieval Times, the Moors were famous for their Missile Light Infantry. I guess both were popular for economic reasons.” that raised me doubts.

***

I also saw here mentioned Picts, Germans, and Magyars, but those were peoples, not warriors.
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,760
Cornwall
Indeed - one of the (many) reasons the African Empires (Almoravid, Almohad, Merinid) tended to have a disdain for Andalusian muslims/kingdoms, was their tendency to be close to the Christians in dress/weaponry/cavalry

The (very complex) make up of muslim Spain should not be confused to the Mauri of Africa. I think there's also some time-confusion there. It's possible, only possible, that the berber army of Tariq in 711 was armed with slings and didn't wear very much. I wouldn't be comparing that with the troops of the Kingdom of Granada in 1482, for example.

Incidentally it's also equally possible that they (Tariq's troops) had largely historically been in the employ of the Imperial forces in North Africa based at Ceuta or Carthage, and were dressed/armed in that style, or the remains thereof
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,118
Canary Islands-Spain
I got a Medieval Warfare Magazine a while back that described how the Moors and Christians used Light Infantry in the wars between them. Moors had Archers and Javilenmen. The main difference between the two types was the Christians would be more likely to have armor. This reminded me at the time of how the Iberian Tribes tended to have the bulk of their troops in similar troops. I was wondering if any of the readers here had run into a similar observation.

Pruitt
Yes, this tradition continued with the Almogavars and started to fade away with the introduction of advanced crossbows in the Late Middle Ages, that substituted javelinemen ligth infantry.

Mounted javelinemen were not so by mounted crossbowmen, widely used among Iberian cavalry as well, but persisted into the 16th century (jinetes), when they were replaced by mounted harquebusiers
 

At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
4,004
Bulgaria
I saw these units Lusitanian javelinmen, Almogavars (and Jinetes/Ginetes from Frank post) in Medieval Total War series. Despite that this is a game series it is known that developers tried hard to achieve historical accuracy in order to attract more gamers.

So description of Lusitanian javelinmen: Excellent skirmishes, lightly armoured and fighting with a javelin in Iberian fashion (probably the best Early Medieval javelinmen unit on the continent). Since the days of the Lusitani tribes in ancient times, the Portuguese have had a long tradition of fighting with the javelin. These lightly armoured skirmishers, drawn from the peasantry, are armed with javelins which they hurl at their foes to weaken their enemies and break up formations. Despite their humble origins these troops are excellent skirmishes.

Almogavars (High and Late Medieval): Elite light infantry skirmishers armed with javelins and spears, and sometimes armour. The name Almughavar comes from Arabic, 'al mughavir' meaning raiders. Originating from Aragon, from both Christian and Muslim backgrounds, these professional warriors are elite light infantry skirmishers armed with javelins and spears, and sometimes armour. Despite their light equipment, they have a fearsome reputation /// Roger de Flor from the Catalan company, a general with pretty good stats is also present.

EDIT: Jinetes are able to do Cantabrian circle formation named after ancient Iberian tribe of Cantabri / these mounted javelin throwers circle around, allowing continuous fire while only exposing a small portion of the group to direct fire from enemy archers / good tactic against infantry and foot archers due to lack of mobility of the enemy.
 
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