U.S. 3rd Army, 4th Armored Division, 25th Recon Cav Mechanized, Troop C Info Sought

Jan 2017
4
USA
#1
Hello everyone - I have been searching for W.W. II after action information on the 25th Recon Cav Mech, Troop C which was a part of the 4th Armored Division. My father-in-law was a member of this group from the time they left the U.S. for England until his discharge at the end of the war. I am trying, as best I can, to trace his route across Europe to build a history for my children (his grandchildren). It's difficult to follow his troop exactly because I see very little in print down to this level of the 25th - CCA did this, CCB did that but where was the 25th in all this. Can anyone guide me towards exact information please? Thank you in advance!

P.S. My father-in-law is on your left in the attached photo along with a buddy of his and their trophy. He told me this flag was captured before but on the road to Bastogne.
 

Attachments

Oct 2015
412
Northwest Territories, USA
#2
I don't know the difference between a Company and a Troop, but I found this entry:

While the 104th put troops along the river, its sister regiment made a march of three and a half miles over rough country but against little opposition and by nightfall of the 24th was near the bridge site at Bonnal. On the extreme left flank at Bilsdorf, Company C of the 249th Engineer Combat Battalion was on reconnaissance when it was struck by a much larger enemy force deployed in the village. The company commander, Capt. A. J. Cissna, elected to stay behind and cover his men as they withdrew from Bilsdorf; he fought alone until he was killed. Cissna was awarded the DSC posthumously.



The 1st Battalion of the 328th (Lt. Col. W. A. Callanan), aided by the 2d Battalion, 101st Infantry, found a rear guard group of the Fuehrer Grenadier Brigade holed up in Arsdorf, near the division west boundary, and spent the night of the 24th digging the grenadiers out of attics and cellars. By midmorning Arsdorf was in hand and the left flank of the 26th Division was fairly secure except for Bigonville, three miles northwest, which now passed into the division zone as CCR, 4th Armored Division, left that village to play a new role on the western flank of the corps.




I believe this took place on the road to Bastogne. Is it helpful?
 
Jul 2016
9,479
USA
#4
Oct 2015
412
Northwest Territories, USA
#5
The 25th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (mec.) fought at Bigonville, Luxembourg, on the way to Bastogne and is listed on the Bogonville WWII web site:
4th Armored Division

They also list two of your father-in-law's comrades that were killed there during the liberation of the little town:
Site Dedication

My Great-uncle was a Captain in the 37th Tank Battalion, Col. Creighton Abrams' S-3 and may have fought beside your father-in-law. At least I'd like to think they knew each other. But you're right - none of the reports get down to the level of Troops, Platoons, and the men that were in them. I suppose somewhere there are lists of those young men and I know that's what you want - to see his name with all the other names in print. Make no mistake, Sammy25th, your father-in-law was a Hero in every sense of the word. Whatever he did, he played a vital role in the liberation of Luxembourg, Bastogne, and beyond.

Good Luck!
 
Jan 2017
4
USA
#7
The 25th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (mec.) fought at Bigonville, Luxembourg, on the way to Bastogne and is listed on the Bogonville WWII web site:
4th Armored Division

They also list two of your father-in-law's comrades that were killed there during the liberation of the little town:
Site Dedication

My Great-uncle was a Captain in the 37th Tank Battalion, Col. Creighton Abrams' S-3 and may have fought beside your father-in-law. At least I'd like to think they knew each other. But you're right - none of the reports get down to the level of Troops, Platoons, and the men that were in them. I suppose somewhere there are lists of those young men and I know that's what you want - to see his name with all the other names in print. Make no mistake, Sammy25th, your father-in-law was a Hero in every sense of the word. Whatever he did, he played a vital role in the liberation of Luxembourg, Bastogne, and beyond.

Good Luck!
Thank you sir. Yes, I am proud to have him as my F-I-L. He;s passed on now and my only regret is that I couldn't get him to talk much about the war. It's also great to hear from people like you who has family that may have known my family. Anyway, thank you for your insight and info!
 
Feb 2017
2
Kentucky
#8
I'm looking too

My grandfather, Celsus G. Meek, was also in the 25th Recon Cav (Mechanized), Troop C. I don't know much about his movements. He passed before I was born.

As far as I can tell, he never talked much about his experiences except when he was wounded in March of 1945.
 
Feb 2017
2
Kentucky
#9
I just thought I'd add this. This was a letter my grandfather wrote while in France. I don't know when it was written or from where it was sent.


Celsus Meek Letter

The following is a letter sent by Celsus Meek to Mrs. Orville Burgess of Vandalio, Ohio. It was published a local newspaper.


Mrs. Orville Burgess R. R. - 1,

Vandalio, Ohio

Hello Edna:

I will try to answer your letter today. I am OK and not doing an awful lot of work but to be truthful I never did much work.

I sure would like to see and Indian Summer. All we have seen here is rain, snow and mud up to our necks. I guess that is just some of the things that go with a war though.

We have moved into a small town that the Jerries and civilians have evacuated. They left plenty of fresh meats, vegetables, wine, cider and cognac. We are now living in luxury. I am living in a hotel doing the cooking, and not bragging on myself I am getting to be quite a cook.

Yesterday for dinner we had roast chicken smothered with potatoes, carrots, onions and a little garlic, brown gravy, bread, butter, hot coffee and fresh milk which is very scarce unless we find a cow strolling around. This is quite a treat after sleeping on the ground for five months and eating "C" and "K" rations.

Did you ever get a letter from Joe? I average getting two letters a month from him. From the way he talks, he has seen some pretty rough times, but I guess anybody who has been in the South Pacific has had a pretty rugged time.

I have in the past seen quite a bit of action but at present we are taking it easy. We were the spearhead for the Third Army's advance across Brittany, and also across France.

Well, I must close as it almost time for me to go on guard. Good night and hello to all the family.

Love, Your Cousin,

Celsus (T-5 Celsus G. Meek)
 
Mar 2017
1
Potomac, MD
#10
Link regarding Troop C, 25th Recon

My uncle, Milton F Landau, was (based on his gravestone) a member of Troop C, and was killed in action on 20 MAR 1945. So far I have not been able to determine where they were on that date.

Did find this information: Nov 9, 1944 or shortly thereafter: "A sudden shift to the south and CC B pushed to the Sarre River where the 8th Tank seized Fenetrange Thanksgiving Day. The first crossing of the Sarre was made by Troop C, 25th. Cavalrymen commanded by 1st Lt. John Keenan, Mars Hill, Me., rushed Gosselming with all guns blazing, took the bridge. Although intact, the span was mined and wired for demolition." From Lone Sentry: The 4th Armored: From the Beach to Bastogne -- WWII G.I. Stories Booklet

Would very much like any other information on Troop C and the 25th, and will share anything I find.
 

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