U.S. 3rd Army, 4th Armored Division, 25th Recon Cav Mechanized, Troop C Info Sought

Jan 2017
4
USA
#11
My uncle, Milton F Landau, was (based on his gravestone) a member of Troop C, and was killed in action on 20 MAR 1945. So far I have not been able to determine where they were on that date.

Did find this information: Nov 9, 1944 or shortly thereafter: "A sudden shift to the south and CC B pushed to the Sarre River where the 8th Tank seized Fenetrange Thanksgiving Day. The first crossing of the Sarre was made by Troop C, 25th. Cavalrymen commanded by 1st Lt. John Keenan, Mars Hill, Me., rushed Gosselming with all guns blazing, took the bridge. Although intact, the span was mined and wired for demolition." From Lone Sentry: The 4th Armored: From the Beach to Bastogne -- WWII G.I. Stories Booklet

Would very much like any other information on Troop C and the 25th, and will share anything I find.
Hello sir and thank you for the information. My trouble has been that (A) there isn't a lot of information out there about the 25th Recon, Troop C and (B) what information is available isn't very helpful for the researcher. Troops were attached do different Combat Commands (CCA, CCB, etc) at different times so it's difficult to find what action a particular troop was involved in - most literature simply states "elements of the 25th Recon." I'll keep digging and will certainly let you know if I find anything. My best bet might be to ride down to D.C. and see what I can locate in the National Archives! For your viewing pleasure and if I do this right, the Kreigsmarine dagger below was captured by my father-in-law early on during his deployment in Europe. There was quite a story he told (one of only a few) about how this took place - a captured Kreigsmarine officer and his family being led out of their "stolen house".............! Kreigsmarine Dagger 1.jpg

Kreigsmarine Dagger 2.jpg
 
#12
My dad was with Troop A of the 25th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized) for the duration.. He began with the 84th Armored Reconnaissance Battalion at Pine Camp, NY. They trained in Tennessee, NY, later in the Mohave Desert before going to Camp Bowie, Texas and then on to NY where they shipped out to England. Before heading overseas, they were re-designated as the 25th Cav Recon Sq (Mecz) Dad was with Company A of the 84th which basically became Troop A of the 25th. Some of the Troops, such as Troop D were put together as far as I have been able to figure out from Recon Co's from like the 37th Tank Battalions.... I have dad's Pine Camp book, if anyone wants I could look to see if your family members are shown in 1942 in the book.
I just thought I'd add this. This was a letter my grandfather wrote while in France. I don't know when it was written or from where it was sent.

I located this photo of Private S.G. Meek - Co. C. 84th Reconnaissance Battalion, at Pine Camp, NY 1942
 

Attachments

#13
Hello everyone - I have been searching for W.W. II after action information on the 25th Recon Cav Mech, Troop C which was a part of the 4th Armored Division. My father-in-law was a member of this group from the time they left the U.S. for England until his discharge at the end of the war. I am trying, as best I can, to trace his route across Europe to build a history for my children (his grandchildren). It's difficult to follow his troop exactly because I see very little in print down to this level of the 25th - CCA did this, CCB did that but where was the 25th in all this. Can anyone guide me towards exact information please? Thank you in advance!

P.S. My father-in-law is on your left in the attached photo along with a buddy of his and their trophy. He told me this flag was captured before but on the road to Bastogne.
What was your father in law's name, Sammy 25th? I will look for him in the 84th Armored Recon Btln book..
 
Nov 2014
1,594
Birmingham, UK
#14
My dad was with Troop A of the 25th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized) for the duration.. He began with the 84th Armored Reconnaissance Battalion at Pine Camp, NY. They trained in Tennessee, NY, later in the Mohave Desert before going to Camp Bowie, Texas and then on to NY where they shipped out to England. Before heading overseas, they were re-designated as the 25th Cav Recon Sq (Mecz) Dad was with Company A of the 84th which basically became Troop A of the 25th. Some of the Troops, such as Troop D were put together as far as I have been able to figure out from Recon Co's from like the 37th Tank Battalions.... I have dad's Pine Camp book, if anyone wants I could look to see if your family members are shown in 1942 in the book.



I located this photo of Private S.G. Meek - Co. C. 84th Reconnaissance Battalion, at Pine Camp, NY 1942
That's amazing, thanks for your contribution
 
#15
I found this piece describing how the Cavalry units were used during the war.... often times it seems to me that the Tank battalions and infantry units get the limelight so to speak and the heroic actions of the smaller units go un-noticed largely.... Clancy Troop A
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"The 4th Armored Division organized its cavalry as an advance guard in its attack to break through to Bastogne beginning 22 December 1944. Combat Command A, attacking on the eastern axis, was led by a team organized around Troop A, 25th CRS. Combat Command B, attacking on the western axis was led by Troop B, 25th CRS. The remainder of the 25th CRS, Troops C, D, E and F, initially provided western flank security for the division. Ultimately the main effort of the division was shifted to CCR. When this occurred Troop C was attached to that command to provide flank security (see figure 30).(61) CCR broke through to Bastogne on 26 December, four days after the division attack began.(62) This disposition of cavalry in support of an armored division attack, with a troop supporting each of the combat commands, was typical. It was anticipated by the additional troop authorization to the armored division squadron under the 1943 table of organization. "

"Actions in the European theater demonstrated that cavalry flank security was expected to provide protection through delay and defensive action. When acting as part of the advance guard, cavalry was expected to attack and destroy enemy outposts and define the main centers of enemy resistance. The combat requirements of mechanized cavalry security went well beyond the early warning which was the only requirement in published doctrine. Security in combat required fighting, a requirement not envisioned by the official doctrine or tables of organization."

Figure 30. 25th CRS Leading Attack to Bastogne.

Doctrine Chapter 4




FULL TEXT HERE:

In June 1944 the United States Army and its allies, executed the long awaited cross channel invasion beginning the final stage of World War II. Cavalry units, organized in corps cavalry groups, separate squadrons and divisional squadrons and troops, played a key role in the European Campaign and tested their evolving doctrine and associated organization and equipment. The course of operations in Europe demonstrated that published cavalry doctrine still did not meet the requirements of the battlefield. Doctrine did not address the breadth of the tactical missions that cavalry was required to perform, nor did it hint at the operational role cavalry played in the theater.

Until the campaigns in Northwest Europe, the United States Army had only limited opportunities to execute multiple corps operations. These had been in the restricted maneuver space of Sicily and Italy where the conditions of terrain and enemy had severely limited the ability to employ mechanized forces and fight a war of maneuver. The European campaign was different. Generally open or mixed terrain with few significant mountain ranges, it was ideal for mounted maneuver. Events would also provide operational and tactical opportunities to employ mechanized cavalry in a wide variety of roles and missions. What these roles and missions were, and how well cavalry fulfilled them would be the final test of World War II cavalry doctrine, organization, and equipment. The result would become the corner stone of the US Army's view of cavalry for the next fifty years.
 

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