US Influence in Latin America

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,727
San Antonio, Tx
#51
It is a little embarrassing actually, to me anyhow. I think this is one reason Americans are generally so lazy about learning other languages.

People in Latin America generally like Americans but it seems some are wary about their government because of their historical record.
It always helps to know the local language, but I’m 100% sure that no American is going to learn Dutch, Frisian, Danish or Hungarian or Greek, etc. - and why should they, because it isn’t useful or practical to learn those languages. Lots of Europeans learn English because it is the world’s default language. Americans “grew up” not needing to learn other languages because we don’t have anything other than Spanish that would be useful. I studied Spanish in high school and it has been mildly useful here in San Antonio. And Spanish is not that difficult or as “irregular” as English.

There is no “official” language in the US, but English is the “default language”.
 
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royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,727
San Antonio, Tx
#52
English was the language tought to most Americans who had ancestors who went threw Ellis Island. My mom was never tought Polish because my great grandmother,great uncle and my grandparents wanted to talk about them and what better way to make sure they don't know what they are saying by speaking polish. English is the major language in the U.S.,U.K.,Bealize,Canada,Ireland and there trying to enforce it in South Africa. Why should we replace English with Spanish? So we contral Portarico still English is spoken there. My church goes to Honduris to help and atleast a few people there speak English.
Virtually 100% of the Puerto Rico uses Spanish as their everyday language. Probably most Puerto Ricans understand and speak some English but it is not their primary language.
 
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royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,727
San Antonio, Tx
#53
British? In case you're not aware the lingua franca in the 19th century was French, not English.
Partially true. French was the prime diplomatic language in international affairs for a long time. This changed to English as a result of the industrial revolution and British hegemony for a very long time. After WW1, the worm slowly turned to English even in the diplomatic sphere.
 
Likes: Futurist
Oct 2015
4,609
Matosinhos Portugal
#54
Kind of hard to ignore the impact Carmen Miranda had on Hollywood in the 40's and 50's. Besides, take away the fruit hat and she was really a cutie


Carmen Miranda was Portuguese and not Brazilian. Brazil is the largest power in South America, please have more respect with the Portuguese speaking countries.

Carmem Miranda era portuguêsa e não brasileira .O Brasil é a maior potência da América do sul, por favor tenha mais respeito com os países de lingua portuguêsa


Maria do Carmo Miranda da Cunha

Carmen Miranda - Wikipedia
 

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,727
San Antonio, Tx
#55
Do not tell the people of Quebec about English being the main language of Canada. :lol:

People from Belize speak more Spanish then so called proper English. However, Belizean Creole is spoken by the majority. Belizean creole is a type of english dialect heavily mixed with African and Native American words.

I got to tell you most US mainlanders know nothing about Puerto Rico. Its been 114 years since the invasion and they still pronounce and spell Puerto Rico , PortRico. And alot of people in PR. cannot speak english.

Like I have said on other sites its 2012 not 1900. Spanish is the second language of the US. Afterall, there are 50 million Hispanics in the US. US is the second largest Spanish speaking nation. US beats Spain. Mexico is first. Hispanic immigrants to the US have cellular phones in which they can stay in contact with there culture for a few cents a minute. Then there is satellite and cable tv with tons of Spanish speaking programs. Then the US has a Spanish language radio station/stations in practically all if not all States. Then there is free over the air Spanish language tv. Then there is Spanish publications which have been growing. And lets not forget the internet. With the exception of publications and some radio stations, people who immigrated to the US in the first half of the 20 century really did not have many of these things to reinforce the language or culture.
Quebec is probably the most distinctive and unique province in Canada. I hope that the Quebecois culture continues to thrive in Canada, even if there are lots of English Canadians who don’t like that. But Quebec is not Canada - Canada is such a big, empty (and cold) place and the other provinces are sometimes/often hostile towards the province of Quebec. That’s too bad, because Quebec is one of the things that make Canada distinctive. Take away Quebec and what do I you have? Ah yes, Nebraska.

I lived in Western Canada for 5 years when I was young: beautiful but also brutally cold. After we returned to the states, I realized that there is basically no difference worth mentioning between Western Canadians and most midwestern American states.

My daughter was married in Puerto Rico at one of the hundreds of big resorts there. The daily language of Puerto Rico is Spanish, not English.
 
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royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,727
San Antonio, Tx
#56
Just to remind you, there is no “official” American language. The language of “common use” in the US is English because the great majority of Americans use English in their daily communications.

Please cite some evidence, if you can, that the majority of Hispanics in this country are here illegally, because I am pretty sure you’re wrong.
 

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